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Category Archives: Cloud Computing

Microsoft will ride artificial intelligence, cloud computing to higher … – CNBC

Posted: June 24, 2017 at 3:00 pm

It’s not just Amazon that will make money from cloud computing and artificial intelligence, according to Wall Street.

Morgan Stanley believes Microsoft’s Azure business will thrive riding the same hot technology trends.

The firm reiterated its overweight rating on Microsoft shares, predicting the company will report profits ahead of expectations next year due to cloud computing demand.

Microsoft’s “top line drivers include the Azure (Microsoft emerging as a public cloud winner), data center (share gains and positive pricing trends), and O365 [Office 365] (base growth and per user pricing lift),” analyst Keith Weiss wrote in a note to clients Monday.

“With a strengthening secular positioning and rationalization of underperforming portions of the solution portfolio, Microsoft is back to showing durable double-digit EPS growth and investors should be willing to pay a higher multiple for that growth,” he added.

Weiss raised his price target for Microsoft to $80 from $72, representing 14 percent upside from Friday’s close.

The analyst cited how the growing “machine learning” [artificial intelligence] trend will spur demand for the company’s Azure cloud computing services and it could add up to $110 billion in market value for Microsoft.

As a result, Weiss estimates Microsoft will generate fiscal 2018 earnings per share of $3.45 compared with the Wall Street consensus for $3.32.

“Windows 10 gives Microsoft an improved story on tablets, a new leg of rev. growth and downstream opps. for synergy with the Surface, Xbox, and the device ecosystem,” he wrote.

CNBC’s Michael Bloom contributed to this story.

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Microsoft will ride artificial intelligence, cloud computing to higher … – CNBC

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Cisco adapts to the rise of cloud computing – The Economist

Posted: June 23, 2017 at 6:48 am

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Cisco adapts to the rise of cloud computing – The Economist

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Amazon accuses Walmart of bullying in cloud computing clash – BBC News

Posted: at 6:48 am


BBC News
Amazon accuses Walmart of bullying in cloud computing clash
BBC News
Walmart, the US's biggest retail chain, has been accused of trying to coerce its technology suppliers into shunning Amazon's cloud computing service. Amazon has accused its rival of attempting to “bully” the IT companies into picking a rival platform
Wal-Mart Prods Partners, Vendors to Leave AWS for AzureMSPmentor
Wal-Mart to vendors: get off Amazon's cloudFox Business
Amazon, Microsoft Still Rule Cloud; Oracle, Alibaba May Catch Up (ORCL, BABA)Investopedia
Newsmax –TheStreet.com –Wall Street Journal
all 51 news articles »

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Amazon accuses Walmart of bullying in cloud computing clash – BBC News

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Cloud-Computing Business Lifts Oracle’s Profit — Update – Fox Business

Posted: at 6:48 am

Oracle Corp. co-founder and executive chairman Larry Ellison predicted three months ago the company’s cloud-infrastructure business would “soon” grow faster than its other web-based, on-demand applications and services.

He didn’t say then when soon would be. But it wasn’t three months.

On Wednesday, Oracle reported fourth-quarter results that topped analysts’ expectations, sending its stock soaring in after-market trading. The company also changed the way it reports its cloud-computing business.

Oracle is mixing its nascent infrastructure-as-a-service business, where it provides computing resources and storage on demand, with its more tenured business of selling access to app-management and data analytics tools, called platform-as-a-service.

In its fiscal fourth quarter, Oracle posted solid results in its cloud-infrastructure business, where it competes against leaders Amazon.com Inc., Microsoft Corp. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google. Revenue from the business rose 23% to $208 million.

The Redwood City, Calif., company’s platform-as-a-service business, combined with its other cloud business that sells access to applications — known as software-as-a-service — saw revenue climb 67% to $1.15 billion for the quarter ended May 31.

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Going forward, it isn’t clear whether Oracle will continue to break out its progress in the cloud-infrastructure market. On a call with analysts, co-Chief Executive Safra Catz said Oracle combined its platform and infrastructure cloud businesses because “synergies and cross-selling between these two businesses is very high.”

Over all, Oracle earned a profit of $3.23 billion, or 76 a share, in its fiscal fourth quarter, up from $2.81 billion, or 66 cents a share, a year earlier. The company said adjusted per-share earnings, which commonly exclude stock-based compensation and other items, were 89 cents.

Revenue rose 2.8% to $10.89 billion. Excluding the impact of a strong U.S. dollar, revenue would have grown 4%, the company said.

According to estimates gathered by S&P Global Market Intelligence, analysts expected Oracle to earn 78 cents a share on an adjusted basis, on revenue of $10.45 billion. Shares jumped 9.5% to $50.18 in recent after-hours trading.

Mr. Ellison has made building the cloud-infrastructure business one of Oracle’s key missions, saying last summer “Amazon’s lead is over” after introducing Oracle’s latest technology for the market.

Amazon, though, continues to pull away. Its Amazon Web Services unit, whose net sales are largely comprised of its cloud-infrastructure business, grew 43% in the most recent quarter to $3.66 billion.

To keep pace with rivals in the cloud-infrastructure market, Oracle will need to meaningfully expand its capital spending and operating expenses, Stifel Nicolaus & Co. analyst Brad Reback recently wrote in a report.

Last year alone, Amazon, Microsoft and Google spent a combined $31.54 billion in 2016 on capital expenditures and leases, much of that on data centers to deliver cloud-infrastructure services.

Oracle spent $2.02 billion on capital expenditures, up from $1.19 billion a year earlier. That, in part, led to operating margins of 34%, compared with 43% in the previous fiscal year. The company has said it doesn’t believe it needs to spend as much as rivals to catch up, arguing its technology is superior.

Mr. Reback, though, believes that the company will invest more in data centers to compete in the cloud-infrastructure market.

“They will need to continue to spend $2 billion or higher a year,” Mr. Reback said in an interview.

Growth in Oracle’s entire cloud business is outpacing the decline in its legacy business of selling licenses to software customers run on their own servers. The cloud business grew $502 million year-over-year while Oracle’s new software-license revenue fell $140 million. It is the fourth-consecutive quarter in which Oracle’s cloud-revenue gains outpaced declines in its legacy software business.

Over all, revenue from new software licenses fell 5% to $2.63 billion.

The biggest piece of Oracle’s software business remains its massive software-license updates and product-support operations. That segment generated $4.9 billion in revenue, a 2% gain from a year earlier.

Write to Jay Greene at Jay.Greene@wsj.com

(END) Dow Jones Newswires

June 21, 2017 17:45 ET (21:45 GMT)

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Cloud-Computing Business Lifts Oracle’s Profit — Update – Fox Business

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Oracle Revenue Blows Away Estimates on Surging Cloud Demand – MSPmentor

Posted: at 6:48 am

(Bloomberg) — Oracle Corp.s push into cloud computing is picking up momentum, sparking a fourth straight quarter of revenue gains for the software maker.

The company, which set a record closing high Wednesday for its shares, reported total sales that easily topped analysts estimates.

Oracles cloud businesses grew 58 percent in the fiscal fourth quarter.

Meanwhile, new software licenses, a measure thats tied to the companys traditional on-premise software offerings, declined 5 percent compared with a drop of 16 percent in the previous period.

Oracles long shift to the cloud, which lets customers access services without installing them on their own computers, is now producing more sturdy growth, indicating that the company can compete against rivals such as Salesforce.com Inc. and Microsoft Corp.

It benefited in particular with applications that help companies in areas such as human resources, customer relationship management and financials.

Sales for that piece of Oracles business, which was detailed for the first time in the earnings report, jumped almost 70 percent.

Everything looks very, very strong, said Joel Fishbein, an analyst at BTIG. Oracle is a legitimate and formidable cloud player.

Shares of Oracle rose as much as 12 percent in extended trading after the earnings were released. Investors have been optimistic this year with the companys stock increasing 20 percent to a record $46.33 at the close in New York.

We continue to experience rapid adoption of the Oracle Cloud, co-Chief Executive Officer Safra Catz said in a statement. This cloud hyper-growth is expanding our operating margins, and we expect earnings per share growth to accelerate in fiscal 2018.

Adjusted revenue increased 3 percent to $10.9 billion in the period ended May 31, the company said Wednesday in a statement.

On average, analysts had projected $10.5 billion, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

Profit, excluding some costs, was 89 cents a share, topping the estimate of 78 cents.

Net income rose 15 percent to $3.2 billion.

During a call with analysts, Catz said she expects adjusted revenue in constant currency to rise 4 percent to 6 percent in the current quarter.

She also projected adjusted earnings of 59 cents to 61 cents per share, adding that Oracle should see double-digit growth in earnings per share for the fiscal year.

Oracles finally turned the corner in terms of its cloud momentum, said Josh Olson, an analyst at Edward Jones. For years, its been kind of struggle. But theyve, I think, found their footing.

Oracle executives used the call to tout the interest of customers in its cloud business.

Last month, the company said that AT&T Inc., the telecommunications giant, had signed a deal to move thousands of databases to Oracles new platforms.

While it provided no revenue at all in Q4, its a very strategic win as a reference to all of our customers about the modernization of databases and the movement of them to the cloud, co-CEO Mark Hurd said during the call.

Still, the better-than-anticipated performance in the traditional business helped deliver much of the positive news in the quarter, said Pat Walravens, an analyst at JMP Securities.

The real outperformance came in the part of the business that theyre moving away from, Walravens said.

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Oracle Revenue Blows Away Estimates on Surging Cloud Demand – MSPmentor

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Catching up with an interconnected federal cloud – GCN.com

Posted: at 6:48 am

INDUSTRY INSIGHT

Traditional IT infrastructures were built for a different time, and conflict with many of the core requirements of modern day computing that is exponentially increasing the worlds connectivity expectations and requirements. Todays government must find a path that leverages disruptive technologies, such as cloud computing, without disturbing agency personnel’s ability to deliver on their core missions.

As agencies try to escape the legacy systems built decades ago, benefits such as cost and energy savings are compelling them to move to cloud environments. In 2011, the White House rolled out the Federal Cloud Computing Strategy was rolled out to address the fact that it can take years to build new data centers for new digital services, or months to increase capacity of existing data center services. The start-small approach enabled by cloud computing lets agencies provision capacity incrementally so they can develop and test applications with smaller initial investments than traditional IT models allow. At the same time, the nature of some expenses change from being capital investments in hardware and infrastructure to a pay-as-you go model, making the cloud was very appealing.

However, a 2014 assessment by the Government Accountability Office revealed that government cloud adoption is lagging often because existing legacy systems are not due to be modernized or replaced. This, coupled with other challenges — such as the decentralized structure of technology investments, lengthy procurement processes, complexities in identifying and then managing an appropriate migration path to the cloud, data governance/control issues, lack of insight into vendor technologies and capabilities and concern about vendor lock-in — has severely impacted the success of cloud adoption.

However, understanding how an agency fits into the use cases for government is the first step in justifying the switch to the cloud. Other reasons include capabilities for the following:

Data analytics on demand. By integrating on-premises computers with pay-per-use cloud computing resources in a seamless user experience, government big data analysts working with massive datasets can shave wait times down to a fraction of an hour.

Distributing applications to users. With smaller footprints in more geographically dispersed collection points connected to the cloud for computing power, agencies can decrease latency, improve reliability and reduce network costs.

Internet of things. By integrating existing systems with various cloud platforms that can seamlessly share data, agencies can provide new digital products and services to demonstrate rapid innovation.

Disaster recovery and continuity of operations. Unplanned outages occur for reasons as routine as human error or hardware failure, and as extreme as natural disasters or acts of terrorism. Simple and cost-effective geographic distribution of disaster recovery sites or mix-and-match cloud services give agencies the redundancy and resiliency they need to still deliver, even in the event of a disaster.

Multicloud flexibility. A multicloud environment introduces the ability to seamlessly use compute power from multiple cloud providers or to easily migrate data from one cloud to another.

The interconnected cloud ecosystem

As government is pushed to think digitally, hybrid and multicloud environments are being seen as the logical next step in the value chain since integrating users, services, capacity and connectivity creates a much better user experience. Connectivity across clouds could be the most important feature of all, as standalone cloud environments can be as isolating as traditional IT infrastructure.

Some agencies have turned to the public internet to connect to clouds only to find that security and performance issues in using the public internet introduce more hurdles. Others have explored establishing dedicated links (via multiprotocol label switching extensions) from their network to each chosen cloud provider. However, this approach is expensive, requires more connections, takes months to provision and leads to vendor lock-in.

To achieve the promise of digital transformation, an interconnected government must use a new strategy to directly and securely connect people, locations, clouds and data. Integrating an interconnection-first approach with a cloud-first strategy enables digital users to gain access to multiple clouds from any location or any device. This paradigm accelerates a new level of interconnection to the multicloud environment and gives users the following benefits:

Government cloud pioneers are demonstrating real and significant cost savings. They are getting unprecedented abilities to scale up and down quickly, are not being locked in and even get enhanced levels of security. Although each agency has a unique mission, security requirements and IT landscapes, the benefits of an interconnected government address every possible scenario.

An interconnected cloud ecosystem creates a high-speed fabric of globally distributed cloud-based points of presence, expanded out to the digital edge. Just as the General Services Administration’s Data Center Shared Services Marketplace is envisioned to be the central location where agencies can choose from an inventory of data center services, automated management tools and products to achieve efficiency and cost savings, an interconnected cloud ecosystem offers a neutral marketplace for providers and consumers to come together.

The government cloud marketplace is maturing, and agencies are becoming both providers and consumers of cloud services. This opens up new avenues for shared services. In order to fulfill the potential for an interconnected government, this platform layer of digital services requires participation by the broadest ecosystem of network and service providers so agencies can take advantage of all that digital transformation can offer.

About the Author

Jody McCann is senior director for government strategy and partnerships at Equinix.

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Cloud-Computing Business Lifts Oracle’s Profit — 2nd Update – Fox Business

Posted: June 22, 2017 at 5:46 am

Oracle Corp.’s stock hasn’t kept pace with some cloud rivals for years as the software company lagged behind in transitioning its business to the cloud.

That may have begun to change Wednesday after Oracle reported earnings that topped Wall Street’s modest forecasts, sending the stock up more than 10% in after hours trading.

The Redwood City, Calif., company said its fiscal fourth-quarter net rose 15% to $3.23 billion, or 76 a share, from $2.81 billion, or 66 cents a share, a year earlier. The company said adjusted per-share earnings, which commonly exclude stock-based compensation and other items, were 89 cents.

Revenue rose 2.8% to $10.89 billion.

According to estimates gathered by S&P Global Market Intelligence, analysts expected Oracle to earn 78 cents a share on an adjusted basis, on revenue of $10.45 billion.

Analysts were particularly impressed with Oracle’s success in bringing in new customers to its web-based, on-demand computing services. Annually recurring revenue, or ARR, from these new customers hit $855 million in the quarter, and topped $2 billion for year, the company said.

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“It’s the best quarter we have ever had,” Oracle co-Chief Executive Mark Hurd said during a conference call with analysts. “We had a goal of $2 billion in ARR; we finished with nearly $2.1 billion. Next year, we will sell more.”

At the same time, Oracle is altering the way it reports on its cloud business. The company is mixing its nascent infrastructure-as-a-service business, where it provides computing resources and storage on demand, with its more tenured business of selling access to app-management and data analytics tools, called platform-as-a-service.

In its fiscal fourth quarter, Oracle posted solid results in its cloud-infrastructure business, where it competes against leaders Amazon.com Inc., Microsoft Corp. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google. Revenue from the business rose 23% to $208 million.

The company’s platform-as-a-service business, combined with its other cloud business that sells access to applications — known as software-as-a-service — saw revenue climb 67% to $1.15 billion ended May 31.

On a call with analysts, co-CEO Safra Catz said Oracle combined results from its platform and infrastructure cloud businesses because “synergies and cross-selling between these two businesses is very high.”

Combining results from the two business will make it harder to measure Oracle’s success in the cloud-infrastructure market. Larry Ellison, Oracle’s co-founder and executive chairman, made building the company’s cloud-infrastructure business a key mission, saying last summer “Amazon’s lead is over” after introducing Oracle’s latest technology for the market.

Amazon, though, continues to pull away. Its Amazon Web Services unit, whose net sales are largely comprised of its cloud-infrastructure business, grew 43% in the most recent quarter to $3.66 billion.

To keep pace with rivals in the cloud-infrastructure market, Oracle will need to meaningfully expand its capital spending and operating expenses, Stifel Nicolaus & Co. analyst Brad Reback recently wrote in a report.

Last year alone, Amazon, Microsoft and Google spent a combined $31.54 billion in 2016 on capital expenditures and leases, much of that on data centers to deliver cloud-infrastructure services.

Oracle spent $2.02 billion on capital expenditures in its fiscal year, up from $1.19 billion a year earlier. That, in part, led to operating margins of 34%, compared with 43% in the previous fiscal year. The company has said it doesn’t believe it needs to spend as much as rivals to catch up, arguing its technology is superior.

Growth in Oracle’s entire cloud business is outpacing the decline in its legacy business of selling licenses to software customers run on their own servers.

The cloud business grew $502 million year-over-year while Oracle’s new software-license revenue fell $140 million. It is the fourth-consecutive quarter in which Oracle’s cloud-revenue gains outpaced declines in its legacy software business.

Over all, revenue from new software licenses fell 5% to $2.63 billion.

The biggest piece of Oracle’s software business remains its massive software-license updates and product-support operations. That segment generated $4.9 billion in revenue, a 2% gain from a year earlier.

Write to Jay Greene at Jay.Greene@wsj.com

(END) Dow Jones Newswires

June 21, 2017 19:11 ET (23:11 GMT)

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Cloud Computing and Digital Divide 2.0 – CircleID

Posted: at 5:46 am

Internet connectivity is the great enabler of the 21st century global economy. Studies worldwide unequivocally link increases in Internet penetration rates and expansion of Internet infrastructure to improved education, employment rates, and overall GDP development. Over the next decade, the Internet will reinvent itself yet again in ways we can only imagine today, and cloud computing will be the primary operating platform of this revolution.

But not for everyone. Worldwide, the estimated Internet penetration rate ranges between 44% and 50%, much of which is through less productive mobile devices than desktop workstations. Overall, Internet penetration rates in developed countries stand at over twice that of underdeveloped economies. For many, high-quality Internet services are simply cost-prohibitive. Low-quality infrastructure and devices, unreliable connectivity, and low data rates relegate millions to a global online underclass that lack the resources and skills necessary to more fully participate in the global economy. First recognized as early as the 1990s, these persistent quantitative inequities in overall availability, usability, etc., demarcate a world of Internet “haves” and “have not’s” known commonly as the “Digital Divide”.

In the decade to come, cloud computing and computational capacity and storage as a service will transform the global economy in ways more substantial than the initial Internet revolution. Public data will become its own public resource that will drive smart cities, improve business processes, and enable innovation across multiple sectors. As the instrumented, data-driven world gathers momentum, well-postured economies will begin to make qualitative leaps ahead of others, creating an even greater chasm between the haves and have not’s that we will call Digital Divide 2.0.

At one end of the chasm are modern information-driven economies that will exploit the foundational technologies of the initial Internet revolution to propel their economies forward as never before. In particular, cloud technologies will unleash new capabilities to innovate, collaborate and manage complex data sets that will facilitate start-ups, create new jobs, and improve public governance.

Meanwhile, many in the developing world will continue to struggle with the quantitative inequities of the first Digital Divide. Developing economies will very likely continue to make some progress; however, their inability to rapidly bridge the Internet capacity gap will inhibit them from fully participating in the emerging, instrumented economies of the developed world. Failing to keep pace, these economies will continue to face the perennial problems of lack of investment, lack of transparency within public institutions, and a persistent departure of talent to more developed economies.

In the early 1990s, there was much sloganeering and some real public policyin the United States regarding the development of “information superhighways” that would connect schools and libraries nationwide. Information sharing across educational institutions provided the critical mass for launching today’s emerging information economy. However, implementation was uneven, and since that time there remain winners and losers, both nationally and globally.

As cloud computing emerges as the principal operating platform for the next-generation information economy, we are again challenged by many of the same questions from two decades ago: who will benefit most from the upcoming revolution? Will progress be limited solely to wealthy urban and suburban centers, already hard-wired with the necessary high-capacity infrastructure, and flush with raw, university-educated talent? Will poorer and rural economies be left to fall that much further behind?

Not necessarily. Industry experts and economists worldwide broadly recognize the tremendous latent economic value of cloud. Clever public-private partnerships in cloud adoption are reinvigorating and transforming municipalities. Shaping public policy begins with recognizing the transformative power of this technology and the role it can play in enabling a wide range of economic sectors.

Now is the time for public sector authorities, private enterprise, and global thought leaders to develop creative approaches to ensure some level of equity in global information technology access. Engagement now may help avoid repeating and exacerbating the original Digital Divide and posture cloud computing as a global enabler, rather than a global divider.

By Michael McMahon, Director, Cyber Strategy and Analysis at Innovative Analytics & Training

Related topics: Access Providers, Broadband, Cloud Computing, Data Center, Policy & Regulation

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Cloud first – Philippine Star

Posted: June 21, 2017 at 4:49 am

Last January, the Department of Information and Communications Technology (DICT) issued a circularaddressed to both the national and local government prescribing the Philippine governments Cloud First Policy.

The policy is aimed at reducing the cost of government information and communications technology (ICT), increasing employee productivity, and developing better citizen online services through the use of cloud computing technology.

Various governments such as the United States, Australia and the United Kingdom have done similar Cloud First Policies.

So what is cloud computing?

The DICT defines cloud computing as a model for enabling ubiquitous, convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources (e.g. networks, servers, storage, applications and services) that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction.

Its characteristics include on-demand self service, broad network access, resource pooling, rapid elasticity and measured service, the department explained.

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What are the benefits that can be derived from using cloud computing technology? DICT says these are inter-agency collaboration, operational continuity and business recovery, faster deployment of services, greater budget control and decreased spending on legacy infrastructure.

The initial DICT GovCloud infrastructure was set up in 2013 by DOST-ICT Office as part of the Integrated Government Philippines (iGovPhil) Project which aims to provide cloud infrastructure access to government agencies.

And then, to pursue its cloud-first policy, government relaunched the Government Cloud or GovCloud initiative last March.

The DICT awarded the P373-million build, operate and transfer a complete cloud solution project to the Vibal Group, a cloud and education technology company which used to be known as a book publisher.

Vibal said GovCloud would use a hybrid cloud strategy that would use both private and public cloud, adding that creation of private in-country data center would ensure data security, while the off-premise public cloud would make online information and services readily available to government agencies.

The company then partnered with a number of technology firms, including Microsoft for the cloud undertaking. Vibal and Microsoft have been official partners since 2012, when Vibal made available its interactive e-books compatible to Windows OS.

Microsoft managing director Karrie Ilagan said their strength and commitment to security, privacy and transparency would empower the government to achieve the best for its citizens.

While cloud computing produces efficiency, productivity and would provide better citizen services, security is paramount to efficiency, especially with the advent of state-sponsored cyberattacks and cyber-espionage.

DICT launched the National CyberSecurity Plan of 2022 just last month in a bid to protect every single user of the internet in the country. This, of course, is timely especially since the Philippines is among the top 10 countries with malware threats.

With the increasing incidence of cyber espionage and cyberattacks initiated by nation-states, there is now a call for a Digital Geneva Convention, whereby governments should commit to avoiding attacking citizens, critical infrastructure and the private sector; reporting vulnerabilities rather than stockpiling, selling or exploiting them; pledging to aid in the containment and recovery from cyberattacks; and creating a trusted national and global IT infrastructure.

Microsoft offers what it calls a secure, trusted cloud which it emphasized is the most important value that it provides compared to other vendors.

Describing its trusted cloud, Microsoft assured that it helps protect data and has the most comprehensive compliance cover all over the world, including solutions for compliance with the Data Privacy Act of the Philippines, protects major IT systems reliably with Microsoft Disaster Recovery, and offers the most IT flexibility with a truly consistent hybrid cloud.

To show its commitment to a secure, trusted cloud, Microsoft has signed the ICT for Shared Prosperity Technology Manifesto with the DICT. It identifies national challenges and issues that need to be addressed, and key technology pillars that can help in championing and driving economic progress in the country.

Microsoft earlier announced that it would continue to invest $1 billion yearly on cybersecurity research and development in the coming years. The amount excludes acquisitions which the company may make in the sector.

The cloud has allowed companies like Microsoft to create much more sophisticated tools to guard against increasingly cunning attackers. Instead of having to manage their own security, companies also now tap cloud service providers like Microsoft to keep their data secure.

Microsoft has what it calls the Enterprise Mobility + Security that allows its clients to get identity-driven protection against todays attacks.

Its product named Azure is said to have the most comprehensive compliance coverage. It is the most trusted cloud for US government institutions.

With the Data Privacy Act of 2012, Microsoft says it has already designed Azure with industry-leading security measures and privacy policies to safeguard data in the cloud, including categories of personal data identified by the Data Privacy Act.

There is also Microsoft Dynamics 365 which are intelligent cloud applications that connect data across sources.

Microsoft explains that its cloud product combines the companys current customer relationship management and enterprise resource planning cloud services into a single service, and includes new, purpose-built applications to help manage specific business functions.

At the end of the day, it is the citizenry who will decide whether or not governments new policies and programs on ICT have improved the delivery of public services.

For comments, e-mail at philstarhiddenagenda@yahoo.com

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Chinese tech giant Alibaba joins key open-source cloud computing foundation – GeekWire

Posted: June 19, 2017 at 7:45 pm

GeekWire File Photo.

Kicking off a week in which it plans to encourage American businesses to invest in China, Alibaba Group announced plans to give something back to the cloud computing community: Alibaba Cloud is now a member of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation.

The Chinese internet giant plans to join the CNCF as a Gold member, putting it on the same level as rival Tencent. The CNCF, which is working to improve adoption of modern cloud-native software development technologies without setting standards, said in a statement that it was looking forward to more open-source contributions from the international cloud community.

Alibaba may not be a household name in the U.S., unless your household sells servers or enterprise computing technology. Nearly half a billion people mostly in China use one of Alibabas many services, from ecommerce to streaming video, and Intel has dubbed the company one of its super seven data center customers. The company is holding an event in Detroit this week with founder and executive chairman Jack Ma to pitch China as a source of new revenue for American businesses.

Alibaba Cloud is the leading cloud computing service in China, although it does face competition from Amazon Web Services and Microsoft there. On a global basis, it trails AWS, Microsoft, and Google by some margin, but Gartners latest Magic Quadrant report ranked it above more established U.S. cloud services like IBM and Oracle based on its belief in Alibabas ability to execute its cloud strategy.

Its definitely a significant addition for the CNCF, which now has a second source of cloud computing expertise in China through which to promote its member projects, most notably the Kubernetes container-orchestration project.

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