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Category Archives: Jitsi

Snowden helping develop tools to protect journalists and whistleblowers – ‘to make the game a little more fair’ – Press Gazette

Posted: February 15, 2017 at 8:58 pm

Whistleblower Edward Snowden is working to develop tools for journalists that he says will help protect them and their sources from government surveillance and state-sponsored hackers.

It comes asthe UK government has been forced to down play fears that proposals to amend the Official Secrets Act would turn journalists and whistleblowers into criminals.

Former US intelligence officer Snowden was forced into exile after sharing confidential US intelligence documents with the press revealing the extent of mass government surveillance.

Since last year, he has been serving as president of the US-based Freedom of the Press Foundation (FPF), having joining its board in 2014.

The non-profit group, which has a team of 10 staff, claims to be dedicated to helping support and defend public-interest journalism.

Speaking to Wired magazine from Moscow, Snowden said the team were trying to provide a few niche tools [for journalists] to make the game a little more fair.

He added: Newsrooms dont have the budget, the sophistication, or the skills to defend themselves in the current environment.

When in 2013 Snowden set about leaking secret government files to journalists among them Guardian columnist Glenn Greenwald,who is a co-founder of the FPF he evaded detection by using anonymity software Tor and teaching reporters how to use encryption tool GPG by creating an online video tutorial that disguised his voice.

He told Wired his current focus was to on developing security and encryption tools that would make this all paint-by-numbers [for journalists] instead of teaching yourself to be Picasso.

Those in development include a hardware modification for the iPhone to detect malware on the device that is secretly transmitting a reporters data, such as their location.

Another, called Sunder, would act as a treasure chest of digital information that can only be opened when several passwords are combined something journalists could use to protect a bulk of data.

The foundation is also working on an easy-to-use version of encrypted video-chat software Jitsi used by Snowden to speak to the magazine via secure video link.

We cant fix the surveillance problem overnight, Snowden said. But maybe we can build a shield that will protect anyone whos standing behind it.

In November the UK government passed the Investigatory Powers Bill that enables the state to use electronic snooping tactics to fight crime, including widespread collection of electronic data.

Following Press Gazettes Save Our Sources campaign, police requests to view journalists call records in order to identify their sources have to be signed off by judges.

But concerns remain that the applications are made in secret and so cannot be argued by news organisations in a court of law.

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Snowden helping develop tools to protect journalists and whistleblowers – ‘to make the game a little more fair’ – Press Gazette

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Edward Snowden’s New Job: Protecting Reporters From Spies – WIRED

Posted: February 14, 2017 at 10:56 am

Slide: 1 / of 1. Caption: 520 Design

This story is part of our special coverage, The News in Crisis.

When Edward Snowden leaked the biggest collection of classified National Security Agency documents in history, he wasnt just revealing the inner workings of a global surveillance machine. He was also scrambling to evade it. To communicate with the journalists who would publish his secrets, he had to route all his messages over the anonymity software Tor, teach reporters to use the encryption tool PGP by creating a YouTube tutorial that disguised his voice, and eventually ditch his comfortable life (and smartphone) in Hawaii to set up a cloak-and-dagger data handoff halfway around the world.

Now, nearly four years later, Snowden has focused the next phase of his career on solving that very specific instance of the panopticon problem: how to protect reporters and the people who feed them information in an era of eroding privacywithout requiring them to have an NSA analysts expertise in encryption or to exile themselves to Moscow. Watch the journalists and youll find their sources, Snowden says. So how do we preserve that confidentiality in this new world, when its more important than ever?

Since early last year, Snowden has quietly served as president of a small San Franciscobased nonprofit called the Freedom of the Press Foundation. Its mission: to equip the media to do its job at a time when state-sponsored hackers and government surveillance threaten investigative reporting in ways Woodward and Bernstein never imagined. Newsrooms dont have the budget, the sophistication, or the skills to defend themselves in the current environment, says Snowden, who spoke to WIRED via encrypted video-chat from his home in Moscow. Were trying to provide a few niche tools to make the game a little more fair.

The groups 10 staffers and a handful of contract coders, with Snowdens remote guidance, are working to develop an armory of security upgrades for reporters. Snowden and renowned hacker Bunnie Huang have partnered to develop a hardware modification for the iPhone, designed to detect if malware on the device is secretly transmitting a reporters data, including location. Theyve recruited Fred Jacobs, one of the coders for the popular encryption app Signal, to help build a piece of software called Sunder; the tool would allow journalists to encrypt a trove of secrets and then retrieve them only if several newsroom colleagues combine their passwords to access the data. And the foundations coders are building a plug-and-play version of Jitsi, the encrypted video-chat software Snowden himself uses for daily communication. They want newsrooms to be able to install it on their own servers with a few clicks. The idea is to make this all paint-by-numbers instead of teaching yourself to be Picasso, Snowden says.

A brief guide to becoming an anonymous source.

Web

The anonymity network Tor obscures your identity by routing your online traffic through computers worldwide. Access it via the web-based Tor Browser to visit any site related to your planned contact with the press. Find a directory of the 35 or so news organizations that maintain SecureDrop portalsTor-enabled inboxes for anonymous tips. Then choose an outlet and leak away.

Phone

Buy a burnera cheap, prepaid Android phonewith cash from a nonchain store in an area youve never been to before. Dont carry your regular phone and the burner at the same time, and never turn on the burner at home or work. Create a Gmail and Google Play account from the burner, then install the encrypted calling and texting app Signal. When youre done, destroy the burner and ditch its corpse far from home.

Snail mail

Pick a distant mailbox, dont carry your phone on the trip, andduhdont include a real return address.

But the foundations biggest coup has been SecureDrop, a Tor-based system for WikiLeaks-style uploads of leaked materials and news tips. The system has now been adopted by dozens of outlets, including The Guardian, The New York Times, and The Washington Post. It works. I know, hinted a tweet from Washington Post reporter David Fahrenthold the day after he published a leaked video of Donald Trump bragging about sexual assault.

In early 2014, the Freedom of the Press Foundations founderswho include the first recipients of Snowdens leaks, journalists Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitrasasked their 30-year-old source to join the groups board as a largely symbolic gesture. But Snowden surprised the board members by showing up to his first meeting with a list of detailed changes to its 40-plus pages of bylaws. The next year he was unanimously elected its president. No one has more practical expertise when it comes to whistleblower and journalist communications, says Trevor Timm, the groups executive director. It was the perfect fit. Snowden has refused a salary, instead giving the group more than $60,000 of his fees from speaking engagements over the past year.

Snowdens own leaks have shown the dire need for the foundations work: In early 2015 he revealed that British spies had collected emails from practically every major newspaper and wire service. Other signs of encroaching state surveillance have also put journalists on guard. Late last year it emerged that Montreal police had tracked the phone calls and texts of a reporter in order to identify sources critical of the department. And in early January, before he had even taken office, Donald Trump called on Congress to investigate a leak to NBC newsone that gave the network a sneak peek at an intelligence report on Russias role in influencing the US election. In the months since Trumps victory, the Freedom of the Press Foundations phones have been ringing off the hook with requests from newsrooms for training sessions, says Timm.

Snowden is quick to note it was the administration of President Obama, not Trump, that indicted him and at least seven others under the Espionage Act for leaking information to journalists. Thats more such indictments than all other presidents in history combined have issued. But Snowden and Timm worry that Trump, with his deep-seated disdain for the media and the full powers of the US Justice Department at his fingertips, will be only too happy to carry forward and expand that precedent.

All of that makes the medias technical protections from spying more important than ever. We cant fix the surveillance problem overnight, Snowden says. But maybe we can build a shield that will protect anyone whos standing behind it. If the group succeeds, perhaps the next Snowden will be able to take refuge not in Moscow but in the encrypted corners of the internet.

Andy Greenberg (@a_greenberg) wrote about Google subsidiary Jigsaw in issue 24.10.

This article appears in the March issue. Subscribe now.

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Jitsi for Windows – Secure Instant Messaging and VoIP

Posted: February 11, 2017 at 7:55 am

Posted10 August 2016

Jitsi is cross-platform, free and open-source software client that supports Instant Messaging (IM), voice and video chat over the internet. It supports many of the most popular and widely used IM and telephony protocols, including Jabber/XMPP (used by Facebook and Google Talk), AIM, ICQ, MSN, Yahoo! Messenger and the SIP Voice-over-IP (VoIP) protocol. It supports additional independent encryption for IM through the OTR (Off-the-Record) protocol and for voice and video sessions through ZRTP and SRTP.

Jitsi is cross-platform, free and open-source software client for Instant Messaging (IM), Voice over IP (VoIP) and video chat. It is compatible with many popular IM and telephony protocols, including Jabber/XMPP, Facebook Messenger, AIM, ICQ, MSN, Yahoo! Messenger and SIP. It provides end-to-end encryption for text chats through the Off-the-Record (OTR) protocol. It also supports end-to-end encrypted voice chat using ZRTP over SIP, though it tends to be somewhat unstable when used in this way.

Important: If you and those with whom you communicate use OTR encryption for text chats and ZRTP encryption for voice calls, Jitsi will protect the content of your conversations from service providers like Google and Facebook. However, these providers can still monitor certain metadata about the conversations you have through Jitsi. Examples include:

They can share this information with third parties, including other companies and governments. For conversations where such metadata could be sensitive, you and those with whom you communicate should consider using a trusted, independent service provider for your XMPP/Jabber chats and SIP calls.

Jitsi allows you to communicate securely through your existing accounts by using end-to-end encryption. This not only makes the content of your communication inaccessible to various third parties, such as government or corporate surveillance platforms, but it also protects your conversations from those who operate the chat services themselves (such as Facebook, if you are using Facebook Messenger, or Google, if you are using Google Talk).

Note: Jitsi was written in the Java programming language. As such, Java must be installed on your computer in order for it to work. Though Java itself does not represent a significant security risk, Java browser extensions are often found to contain vulnerabilities that allow malicious websites to install malware or assume control of your computer. If your browser has a Java plugin installed, we strongly recommend that you disable it.

Jitsi is available for MS Windows, GNU Linux and Mac OS. It can be used to communicate with other XMPP or SIP clients that support end-to-end encryption through OTR (for text chat) or ZRTP (for voice calls). Examples are recommended below:

To install Jitsi, follow the steps below:

Step 1. Browse to the Jitsi download page: https://jitsi.org/Main/Download

Figure 1: The Jitsi download page

Step 2. Scroll down and click [Microsoft Windows Installers] to download Jitsi.

Figure 2: Downloading the Jitsi package

Step 3. Right-click on the downloaded Jitsi file and select [Open], as illustrated below:

Figure 3: Opening the downloaded Jitsi file

Step 4. Click [Next] to start installing Jitsi on your computer.

Figure 4: Jitsi Setup Wizard

Step 5. Read Jitsi’s License Agreement and check [I accept the terms in the License Agreement].

Figure 5: Jitsi End-User License Agreement

Step 6. Click [Next] to proceed with the installation process.

Step 7. Click [Next] to install Jitsi to the default folder. Alternatively, click [Change…] to select the folder you would like to install Jitsi to.

Figure 6: Jitsi installation destination folder

Step 8. Select shortcuts, settings and associated protocols through the following window and click [Next]. The default settings here are fine.

Figure 7: Jitsi Setup Wizard Addtional Tasks

Step 9. Click [Install] to install Jitsi on your computer.

Figure 8: Installation of Jitsi

Wait while Jitsi gets installed.

Figure 9: Installing Jitsi

Step 10. Click [Finish] to complete the installation process.

Figure 10: Completing the installation process of Jitsi

Jitsi supports many different protocols and services for chat. The first time you launch it, you will see the window shown in Figure 1, which allows you to add the accounts you want to access through Jitsi.

Figure 1: Jitsi’s initial account configuration screen

Note: Both Google Talk and Facebook may require that you change certain account settings before you can access their chat services through Jitsi. To learn how, see the following two sections:

You can use this screen to enter a username and password for each of the services displayed, thereby adding up to four accounts in one easy step. But you must already have accounts on these services to do so. The sections below describe how to set up accounts for various IM and VoIP service providers.

As shown in Figure 1 of the previous section, the first time you launch Jitsi, you will see an account configuration screen that allows you to add various chat services to the application. After you have added at least one account, this screen will no longer appear. In order to add additional accounts, follow the steps below.

Step 1. Click [File] in Jitsi’s menu bar and select [Add new account…] to choose the service or protocol you want to use.

Figure 1: Adding a new account

Step 2. Select [Google Talk] from the Network list.

Figure 2: Selecting Google Talk

Step 3. Type your Google username and passphrase.

Figure 3: Entering a Google username and password

Step 4. (Optional) Uncheck the Remember password box

Important: If you want Jitsi to remember your passphrases for you, you should first enable its Master Password feature.

Step 5. Click [Add].

You can now use Jitsi to communicate through the Google Talk account you have added.

Note: If you are using 2-step verification to protect access to your Gmail account, you might see an error like the one shown in Figure 4 when Jitsi tries to access your account. (It will display the same error if you get your passphrase wrong.) To log in using Jitsi, you will need to generate an “application-specific password”. To learn how, see Google’s instructions.

Figure 4: Google Talk authentication failed (possibly as a result of “2-step verification” settings)

There are two settings that you might need to change, on the Facebook website, for Jitsi to use Facebook as a chat service.

Facebook Username

Before Jitsi can connect to Facebook, you must assign a username to your Facebook account. Unlike most Web services, Facebook does not require you to select a username when you create your account, but it does allow you to create one if you wish. You can confirm your username by signing into your Facebook account. Your username is what appears in the location bar of your browser after https://www.facebook.com/ when you view your Timeline or Page. So, if your username is elena.s.katerina, you should see https://www.facebook.com/elena.s.katerina in your browser’s location bar when viewing your Timeline. Your username is also part of your Facebook email address (elena.s.katerina@facebook.com, for example).

If you do not have a Facebook username, you can choose one by signing into your account and selecting Settings > General or by browsing to https://www.facebook.com/username. Facebook might require that you verify your account before allowing you to select a username. This might require giving Facebook a mobile phone number at which you can receive a text message. For more details see Facebooks explanation of usernames.

App Settings

You must turn on Facebooks application platform in order to give Jitsi access to your account. To do this, sign in, select Settings > Apps and confirm that the Apps, Websites and Plugins setting is Enabled.

Note: Turning on Facebooks application platform opens up much of your Facebook data to third-party application developers. This data is available not only to the Facebook applications that you use, but also to the Facebook applications used by your friends. After turning on Facebooks Apps, Websites and Plugins, be sure to check the settings under Apps others use. This setting allows you to hide some personal information from applications used by your friends. Unfortunately, Facebook does not offer settings to hide all personal information. As long as the application platform is Enabled, certain categories of data (including your friend list, your gender, and any information you have made public) are accessible to apps used by others. If this is unacceptable, you should disable Apps, Websites and Plugins and avoid using Jitsi with Facebook Messenger.

Once you have chosen a Facebook username and enabled the application platform, you can add your Facebook account to Jitsi.

As shown in Figure 1 of the Add accounts to Jitsi section, the first time you launch Jitsi, you will see an account configuration screen that allows you to add various chat services to the application. After you have added at least one account, this screen will no longer appear. In order to add additional accounts, follow the steps below.

Step 1. Click [File] in Jitsi’s menu bar and select [Add new account…] to choose the service or protocol you want to use.

Figure 1: Adding a new account

Step 2. Select [Facebook] from the Network list.

Figure 2: Selecting Facebook

Step 3. Type your Facebook username and password.

Figure 3: Entering a username and password into the Add New Account screen

Step 4. (Optional) Uncheck the Remember password box.

Important: If you want Jitsi to remember your passphrases for you, you should first enable its Master Password feature.

Step 5. Click [Add].

You can now use Jitsi to communicate through the Facebook account you have added.

XMPP and Jabber are different names for the same instant messaging protocol. It is an open standard, and there are many providers who offer free Jabber/XMPP accounts that you can use with Jitsi. The IM Observatory allows you to evaluate some security properties of public Jabber/XMPP services.

If you have experience running online services, you can also install a Jabber/XMPP server (such as ejabberd or Prosody IM) on your own server and provide accounts to members of a particular community or organization.

Below, we recommend a few services that have a great deal of experience protecting their users’ privacy.

Note: Even if you trust your service provider, It is still important that you use OTR encryption to keep your instant messages confidential. So make sure that you and those with whom you communicate know how to use it properly. This is covered in the section on Using Jitsi for secure instant messaging

The Chaos Computer Club (CCC) hosts a free Jabber service. Their servers are located in Germany. From within Jitsi, you can simultaneously create an account on jabber.ccc.de and add it to Jitsi. This works for many traditional Jabber/XMPP services.

Step 1. Click [File] in Jitsi’s menu bar and select [Add new account…] to choose the service or protocol you want to use.

Figure 1: Add new accounts

Step 2. Select [XMPP] from the Network list.

Figure 2: Selecting XMPP

The steps below assume that you do not yet have a jabber.ccc.de account. (If you do, just enter your username and passphrase and click [Add].)

Step 3. Select [Create a new XMPP account].

Figure 3: Creating a new jabber.ccc.de account, within Jitsi, using the Add New Account screen

Step 4. Type [jabber.ccc.de] in the Server box.

Step 5. Choose a username and type it into the XMPP username box.

Step 6. Choose a passphrase and type it into the Password and Confirm Password boxes.

Step 7. Click [Add] to request the username you have chosen.

If the username you requested is unavailable, the registration process will fail, and Jitsi will announce that it: failed to create your account due to the following error: Could not confirm data. You can try again by repeating the process with a different username.

If you do not log in to your jabber.ccc.de account for 12 months, your account will be removed, and your username will be made available for registration by others.

Riseup is a collective dedicated to providing secure services for individuals and organizations committed to political and social justice. Their servers are located in the United States.

If you already have a Riseup.net email account, you can use the same account for their Jabber/XMPP service. In order to create an account, you will need two invitation codes from two different Riseup.net members. You can then visit https://user.riseup.net and create an account. Once your account is active, you can add it to Jitsi by following the steps below.

As shown in Figure 1 of the Add accounts to Jitsi section, the first time you launch Jitsi, you will see an account configuration screen that allows you to add various chat services to the application. After you have added at least one account, this screen will no longer appear. In order to add additional accounts, follow the steps below.

Step 1. Click [File] in Jitsi’s menu bar and select [Add new account…] to choose the service or protocol you want to use.

Figure 1: Adding new accounts

Step 2. Select [XMPP] from the Network list.

Figure 2: Selecting XMPP

Step 3. Type the username for your Jabber/XMPP account on this service.

Figure 3: Entering a username and password into the Add New Account screen

Your username should include the **@** symbol and the hostname of the service. For example

Step 4. Type the passphrase for your Jabber/XMPP account on this service.

Step 5. (Optional) Uncheck the Remember password box.

Important: If you want Jitsi to remember your passphrases for you, you should first enable its Master Password feature.

Step 6. Click [Add].

You can now use Jitsi to communicate through this Jabber/XMPP account.

In this section, we recommend only a single Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) provider, ostel.co. Their servers are located in United States. There are many free SIP services online, but ostel.co appears to offer the most reliable support for end-to-end encryption through ZRTP.

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Jitsi for Mac – Download – jitsi.en.softonic.com

Posted: February 6, 2017 at 2:54 pm

Jitsi is a free messenger client for Mac, which supports most major protocols and even supports video and audio conversations.

Simply choose the IM protocol that you’d like to connect to including SIP, Google Talk, XMPP/Jabber, MSN or Windows Live Messenger, AIM, Bonjour, ICQ, Yahoo Messenger and Facebook chat. In the main window, you’ll find all your personal contacts.

In the Jitsi chat window, you can exchange IM messages or initiate video or audio chats including group chats. There are a limited number of emoticons and the Jitsi keeps a history of your chats. Although the interface isn’t quite as intuitive as Adium. However, the fact that you can initiate audio and video chats gives it a serious advantage.

Note that this download link takes you to the nightly build page because Jitsi is being updated so regularly, that you can choose the latest version more easily.

Jitsi might not be quite as slick as other IM clients but wide support of IM protocols plus audio and video chatting makes it a very interesting option.

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Jitsi softphone for Windows OnSIP Support

Posted: November 23, 2016 at 9:57 pm

Updated 10/26/2015 Jitsi version 2.8.5426 for Windows. Tested on Windows 7 64bit with SP1. Step 1: Gather information.

Each user has a set of credentials which will be needed to configure each phone. For each phone that you are configuring, obtain the following:

You can find this information in the user detail pages under the Users tab in the Phone Configuration section.

These images are based on using a Windows 7 64bit computer.

A. When you first open Jitsi after installation it will open setup wizard. DO NOT enter any data, click on Cancel to continue.

B. Click on Tools then Options

C.Click on Add

D. Choose SIP for Network then click on Advanced, DO NOT enter any user info

E. Enter User Name and SIP Password in Account page

F. In Connection page, enter the following information

G. On Encoding page, move up the following codec and uncheck all the other codec

H. Click Next, then click on Sign In. Jitsi should now beregistered and ready for use.

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Trying to install jitsi meet with apache2 – Stack Overflow

Posted: October 29, 2016 at 11:45 am

I know there are already post on this subject, but they don’t produce good results and I would like to share, here, my thinking on this subject. Feel free to moderate my post if you think it’s a bad idea.

Server: Ubuntu 16.04.1, Apache2.4.18

DNS conf:

Like I said I try to run Jitsi meet on apache2. By following the steps described in Quick install (https://github.com/jitsi/jitsi-meet/blob/master/doc/quick-install.md)

If I install Jitsi meet on my server just after installing Ubuntu so without Apache or Nginx. Jitsi works great. If I install Jitsi meet on my server after installing Nginx. Jitsi works great.

With the same method of installation, I try to install Jitsi meet after installing Apache2, so I notice that Jitsi meet does not configure itself apache2, so I tried this first configuration:

When I load the page meet.mydomain.xx I get the following error:

“It works! Now your customer BOSH points to this URL to connect to Prosody.

For more information see Prosody. Setting up BOSH ”

But when I look at the /etc/prosody/conf.avail/meet.mydomain.xx.cfg.lua file, I notice that bosh is already enabled and the rest of the configuration is ok with what is explain here https://github.com/jitsi/jitsi-meet/blob/master/doc/manual-install.md The log contains no errors. If you have an idea to fix this problem I’m interested.

Second configuration that I tested:

With this setup the result seems better, I can see the home page of Jitsi meet but without the text, without the logo and when I click on the go button, nothing happend. The log contains no errors.

So here I don’t no really what to do. If someone have some advices or ideas, thank you to share it !

Bye, thank you for reading

Gspohu

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Jitsi – Wikipedia

Posted: October 27, 2016 at 11:58 am

Jitsi Original author(s) Emil Ivov Developer(s) Jitsi Team and Contributors Initial release 2003(2003) Stable release 2.8 (build.5426) (March19, 2015; 18 months ago(2015-03-19)) [] Preview release 2.9 (nightly) [] Development status Active Written in Java Operating system Linux, Mac OS X, Windows (all Java supported) Size 52.4 MB Windows (bundles its own private JRE)[1] 78.8MB Mac OS X (includes private JRE)[2] 22MB Linux 65MB source code[3] Available in Asturian, English, French, German, Bulgarian, Japanese, Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Greek and 25 more Type Voice over Internet Protocol / instant messaging / videoconferencing License Apache 2.0[4] Website jitsi.org

Jitsi (formerly SIP Communicator) is a free and open source multiplatform[5]voice (VoIP), videoconferencing and instant messaging application for Windows, Linux, Mac OS X and Android. It supports several popular instant-messaging and telephony protocols, including open recognised encryption protocols for chat (OTR) and voice/video/streaming and voice/video conferencing (SIP/RTP/SRTP/ZRTP), as well as built-in IPv6, NAT traversal and DNSSEC. Jitsi and its source code are released under the terms of the Apache Software Licence.[6]

Work on Jitsi (then SIP Communicator) started in 2003 in the context of a student project by Emil Ivov at the University of Strasbourg.[7] It was originally released as an example video phone in the JAIN-SIP stack and later spun off as a standalone project.[8]

Originally the project was mostly used as an experimentation tool because of its support for IPv6.[9][10] Through the years, as the project gathered members, it also added support for protocols other than SIP.

Jitsi has received support from various institutions such as the NLnet Foundation,[11][12] the University of Strasbourg and the Region of Alsace[13] and it has also had multiple participations in the Google Summer of Code program.[14][15]

In 2009, Emil Ivov founded the BlueJimp company which has employed some of Jitsi’s main contributors[16][17] in order to offer professional support and development services[18] related to the project.

In 2011, after successfully adding support for audio/video communication over XMPPs Jingle extensions, the project was renamed to Jitsi since it was no longer “a SIP only Communicator”.[19][20] This name originates from the Bulgarian “” (wires).[21]

On November 4, 2014, “Jitsi + Ostel” scored 6 out of 7 points on the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s secure messaging scorecard. They lost a point because there has not been a recent independent code audit.[22]

On February 1, 2015, Hristo Terezov, Ingo Bauersachs and the rest of the team released[23] version 2.6 from their stand at the Free and Open Source Software Developers’ European Meeting 2015 event in Brussels. This release includes security fixes, removes support of the deprecated MSN protocol, along with SSLv3 in XMPP. Among other notable improvements, the OS X version bundles a Java 8 runtime, enables echo cancelling by default, and uses the CoreAudio subsystem. The Linux build addresses font issues with the GTK+ native LookAndFeel, and fixes some long standing issues about microphone level on call setup when using the PulseAudio sound system. This release also adds the embedded Java database Hyper SQL Database to improve performance for users with huge configuration files, a feature which is disabled by default. A full list of changes is[24] available on the project web site.

Jitsi supports multiple operating systems, including Windows as well as Unix-like systems such as Linux, Mac OS X and BSD. “Beta” packages built for Android are available[25] but the project’s roadmap describes the porting to Android as “on hold”.[26] It also includes:[27]

The following protocols are currently supported by Jitsi:[5]

Jitsi is mostly written in Java[32] which helps reuse most of the same code over the various operating systems it works on. Its GUI is based upon Swing. The project also uses native code for the implementation of platform specific tasks such as audio/video capture and rendering, IP address selection, and access to native popup notification systems such as Growl.

The project uses the Apache Felix OSGi implementation[33] for modularity.

Among others Jitsi uses the JAIN-SIP protocol stack for SIP support and the Jive Software Smack library[34] for XMPP.[35]

As Jitsi can handle IPv6 it is especially interesting for direct PC-to-PC (peer-to-peer) communication, for instance, if both sides were ‘trapped’ behind NAT routers, but could obtain a reachable IPv6 address via a tunnel-broker.[citation needed]

The Jitsi community has also completed an ICE implementation called ice4j.org, which it uses to provide NAT traversal capabilities, and assist IPv4 to IPv6 transition.[36]

Audio systems supported are PortAudio, PulseAudio and WASAPI (Windows Audio Session API).

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Jitsi – Mensajera instantnea segura de texto, audio y …

Posted: August 10, 2016 at 9:07 pm

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Lo que usted obtiene:

GNU Linux, Mac OS, Microsoft Windows y otros programas compatibles.:

Jitsi est disponible para GNU Linux y Mac OS, as como para MS Windows (y prximamente para Android OS). A continuacin se recomiendan otros programas con los que Jitsi se puede comunicar usando el cifrado independiente OTR o ZRTP:

Para mensajes de texto: Pidgin (MS Windows y GNU Linux), Miranda (MS Windows), Adium (Mac OS X), ChatSecure (Android OS y iOS, conocido anteriormente como Gibberbot).

Para llamadas de voz: CSipSimple (Android OS), Linphone (GNU Linux, MS Windows, Mac OS X, Android OS, iOS y otros).

1.1 Cosas que debera saber acerca de esta herramienta antes de comenzar

Jitsi es compatible con diferentes tipos de cuentas y protocolos de comunicacin y, por lo tanto, puede comunicarse con contactos que utilicen otros programas. Algunos de esos programas ofrecen funciones similares para mejorar la seguridad de su comunicacin (como los programas mencionados en la seccin anterior), y soportan el cifrado independiente de texto y voz (OTR y ZRTP). Otros programas podran no tener implementadas estas funciones, especialmente los propios (por ejemplo, el chat de Facebook o Google Talk). Sin embargo, con Jitsi podr comunicarse de todas formas con contactos que utilicen dichos programas propios, slo que sin los beneficios adicionales de las funciones de seguridad de Jitsi.

Sin importar si se comunica mediante texto, voz o vdeo, los proveedores de servicios como Facebook Chat, Google Talk, Yahoo! Messenger, Skype o Viber tienen acceso a sus sesiones de comunicacin y pueden ofrecer el acceso a terceros, tales como corporaciones o gobiernos. Jitsi le permite comunicarse de manera segura y privada usando sus cuentas existentes con la ayuda de un cifrado adicional. Esto hace que el contenido de sus comunicaciones sea inaccesible para los proveedores de cuentas y posibles terceros. Para poder proteger sus sesiones de chat y conversaciones privadas, Jitsi utiliza mtodos criptogrficos, inclusive Off-the-Record (OTR) para conversaciones de texto, y ZRTP/SRTP para llamadas de voz.

Otra diferencia a notar entre Jitsi y programas como Skype es que Jitsi permite que los usuarios sigan usando sus cuentas existentes con un proveedor de servicio distinto, independiente de los desarrolladores del programa. Esto tambin significa que necesita configurar una cuenta antes de poder utilizar Jitsi.

Nota: Jitsi utiliza el lenguaje de programacin Java, de forma que el programa Java debe estar instalado en el equipo para que funcione. Se sabe que Oracle Java tiene varias vulnerabilidades de seguridad que pueden permitir que usuarios remotos tomen control del equipo e instalen spyware para acceder o controlar todos sus datos y comunicaciones. Se recomienda ampliamente que minimice el nmero de programas que tienen permitido utilizar Java en su equipo. Mire cmo desactivar complementos asociados con Java en Firefox y consulte los pasos para deshabilitar Java en todos los navegadores del equipo. Sin embargo, como ver ms adelante en este captulo, a pesar del uso de Java, hay una serie de beneficios de seguridad al utilizar Jitsi.

Read more here:
Jitsi – Mensajera instantnea segura de texto, audio y …

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Jitsi – Quora

Posted: May 31, 2016 at 2:46 pm

“MW}y{2M0Ii&mvU?XI@^*q?{a@qpO{!mEA y~`$[Oc1g8R3wa|C4e9v,ni”(~]a8}/ qMed!G#/GBfQ0Gr1#!I@4Z4 $3xfpV+% ]K.|^, ‘161z.[X010$WwF$6#Zea4f;>[8Xb@*?Bj+8[+ Dh(“G;[cRM[sYX;_t{}[7H*sxK9^.r5cc[+henTl$__cAu*J-GPs##c&q|@I |tE% q15l`NW’f v30ACqZKeTC=a_QrV175Q-!X +ptrSu 8 0TH6FOP$>xn=4I.A!v] 2A_Z?4dA

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Chocolatey Gallery | Jitsi 2.8.5426

Posted: May 28, 2016 at 4:44 am

Private CDN cached downloads available for licensed customers. Never experience 404 breakages again! Learn more…

This package was approved by moderator ferventcoder on 4/24/2015.

Jitsi (formerly SIP Communicator) is a free and open source multiplatform voice (VoIP), videoconferencing and instant messaging application for Windows, Linux and Mac OS X. It supports several popular instant messaging and telephony protocols, including open recognised encryption protocols for chat (OTR) and voice/video/streaming and voice/video conferencing (SIP/RTP/SRTP/ZRTP), as well as built-in IPv6, NAT traversal and DNSSEC. Jitsi and its source code are released under the terms of the LGPL.

To install Jitsi, run the following command from the command line or from PowerShell:

To upgrade Jitsi, run the following command from the command line or from PowerShell:

In cases where actual malware is found, the packages are subject to removal. Software sometimes has false positives. Moderators do not necessarily validate the safety of the underlying software, only that a package retrieves software from the official distribution point and/or validate embedded software against official distribution point (where distribution rights allow redistribution).

Chocolatey Pro provides runtime protection from possible malware.

This package has no dependencies.

20042012 Emil Ivov

https://jitsi.org/Main/News

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Chocolatey Gallery | Jitsi 2.8.5426

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