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Cuomo wants to resurrect charity gambling. Is it too late? – Buffalo News

Posted: February 19, 2017 at 11:49 am

ALBANY Gov. Andrew Cuomo embraced the spread of state-sanctioned gambling during his first six years in office, from expanded lottery and commercial casinos to daily fantasy sports wagering.

One of the outcomes, though, was that churches, fire halls and veterans posts that run bingo games, raffles and other games of chance suffered with the saturation of new gambling opportunities across New York.

So Cuomo now is pressing for major changes to the states charitable gambling laws. He wants to help the charitable groups reverse the slump in revenues that has eaten into their support of local activities, such as youth sports leagues, scholarship funds or veterans programs.

Its an acknowledgement that this is an important activity in New York that requires some care and nurturing, Robert Williams, executive director of the governors state Gaming Commission, said of the proposals tucked into 42 pages of legislation in Cuomos budget for this year.

The governor’s proposals include:

But is it too little too late?

Thats what some charity groups are wondering. Walk into a bingo hall, and you see their clientele: old and getting older.

And that group is not being replaced by millennials who, if they do gamble, are attracted to claims of bigger and faster payoffs at more upscale casinos or through illegal off-shore internet sites they can access on their phones.

Consider also that the total amount of money wagered on bingo across New York in 1980 was $223 million. In 2015, that sum had slipped to $31 million

Charities unable to compete

Competition from lottery games, like the omnipresent Quick Draw electronic games, is far and away the key reason for declining bingo and raffles of charitable groups.

Casinos that dot the landscape across the state, particularly upstate, also havent helped.

Charities in Western New York face competition from three Seneca Nation casinos, two racetrack-based casinos and gambling offerings in Ontario.

Now add state rules that kept these charities operating games stuck in a kind of time warp with paper slots called bell jars and often retrieved by gamblers from a fancy or otherwise container.

Volunteer Valerie Schmarje, right, sells Joanne Lorenz some pull tabs at Fourteen Holy Helpers in West Seneca on Feb. 16. (Robert Kirkham/Buffalo News)

Charities say they cant go up against a casino and its array of slots, table games, entertainment, alcohol and food.

Ive been in local casinos and seen some of our players there, said Paul Podsiadlo, one of the volunteer chairmen who runs the weekly bingo nights held for more than 40 years at Fourteen Holy Helpers church in West Seneca.

I hear players talk and say, I couldnt come last week because I went to the casino. They only have so much money to spend in a week, and if they spend it at the casino they dont come to bingo, he said.

Catholic churches once were synonymous with bingo. Today, many have shut down their money-losing operations, unable to draw gamblers or volunteers to run the games.

Those that remain try to offer amenities to lure consumers. Some of those give a bow to their aging clientele. One bingo hall in Western New York now offers earlier evening hours that promises to get bettors home sooner.

Another key attraction: no stairs to climb.

Bingo attendance statewide has dropped so much since 1997 when 10 million bettors played that the state no longer even bothers to count how many people play. (Robert Kirkham/Buffalo News)

At Fourteen Holy Helpers, parishioners are dealing with the Catholic Dioceses decision to close its school in 2014. The parish still needs to raise money to subsidize the cost of sending its students to another Catholic school. Thats where the churchs weekly bingo games come into play as a longtime fundraising device.

But revenues from bingo and other games of chance are off more than 25 percent from peak years at Holy Helpers.

And that is the case throughout New York.

Bingo halls across the state in 1997 reported 10 million bettors, according to the then-Racing and Wagering Board.

By 2005, bingo attendance had been cut in half.

Now, the state doesnt even bother to put a number on how many people play bingo, according to that agencys successor, the state Gaming Commission.

Thirty years ago, about 550 groups offered regular bingo fundraisers in an eight-county region of Western New York, recalled Charles Gajewski, owner of the sole remaining supplier of gambling products to charities in the Buffalo area. Today, the number of organizations offering bingo has fallen to about 150, he said.

Bingo and bell jars

While bingo is often the poster child of charitable gambling, the sale of bell jar tickets, or pull tabs, is now the big draw for charities.

Bell jars accounted for $215 million of the $250 million charities reported being wagered in New York in 2015, according to the Gaming Commission.

In contrast, bingo players put down $31 million in wagers in 2015 while raffles accounted for about $3 million.

Among Cuomos proposals is to raise the top prize for bell jars from $500 to $1,000.

Gambling tickets ready to be used at Fourteen Holy Helpers. (Robert Kirkham/Buffalo News)

Bell jars are cards, usually sold for less than $2 apiece, drawn from a jar or machine and they contain numbers, colors or symbols that, when uncovered, reveal a prize or not.

Kirby Hannan wants lawmakers to let charities use enhanced bell jar machines that come with video screens and encourage a quicker play by gamblers.

Charitable gaming technology has not been revitalized in way more than 30 years, said Hannan, legislative director for the Veterans of Foreign Wars in New York. The young people were trying to attract are not pulling pull tabs from a jar. They prefer to see a video screen.

Without modernizing the bell jar games that many vet groups offer as their sole gambling option, Hannan said, 90 percent of the organizations I represent would probably not benefit significantly from Cuomos proposal.

Charitable gaming was initially designed to help non-profits, such as military service organizations, churches and fire houses to help them raise funds. And yet were the once stuck in the paper world, said Marlene Roll, an Alden resident and past statewide commander of the VFW in New York.

Wholesale modernization

Cuomo administration officials say the governors plan amounts to a wholesale modernization of charitable gambling.

His plan would lift restrictions on advertising, such as on the internet.

To deal with shortages of volunteers working the gambling ventures, Cuomo wants to lift barriers that prohibit people with certain criminal backgrounds such as a public drunkenness charge when they were a teenager from working at a bingo parlor.

Cuomo also seeks to reconcile competing statutes to make clear that all charitable gambling can be conducted on Sundays.

Giving flexibility to where charities can offer gambling is meant to prevent problems that arose last year that forced a Niagara Falls charity to cancel the annual Duck Race at the Canal Fest of the Tonawandas because it was to be held on state property. The state let the event proceed.

The Catholic Church is noncommittal regarding Cuomos proposals.

While bingo is used as a fundraiser by some of our parishes, its too early to determine what some or all of these proposed changes might mean to those parishes, said George Richert, a spokesman for the Diocese of Buffalo.

Groups concerned about the states gambling expansion say the irony is not lost that Cuomo now seeks to enhance charitable gambling operations after he led the support of the 2013 referendum for legalizing up to seven new Las Vegas-style casinos.

They also question Cuomos plan to allow gamblers to place their charitable bets on a credit card.

The proposal is yet another expansion of predatory gambling in New York State, said Dr. Stephen Shafer, chair of the Coalition Against Gambling in New York, a group that had its organizational roots in Buffalo.

More gambling options, even if run by charities, equates to more problem gambling, he said.

All these moves reflect the fallacy that legalized gambling is good for New York State because some money flows from it into support for education or charitable causes, Shafer said in an email response to questions.

Even if all of Cuomos charitable gambling proposals are cleared in state budget talks, few charities think the gambling times of the past will return.

With more and more casinos popping up in the last five to 10 years, I think we are now seeing the repercussions from that, said Roll, the past statewide VFW commander. The bank accounts of these groups have dwindled because were just not seeing the money come in like it did.

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Cuomo wants to resurrect charity gambling. Is it too late? – Buffalo News

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AFA: Help us urge Trump to protect First Amendment – OneNewsNow

Posted: February 17, 2017 at 12:59 am

A pro-family organization is encouraging conservative Christians to join its online effort to ask President Donald Trump to defend religious liberty.

A draft memo that outlined a proposed executive order leaked from the White House in early February, ending up in the hands not of religious organizations but homosexual rights groups.

The existence of the memo was first reported by left-wing news website The Nation.

If the content of the memo is true, says a spokesman for homosexual lobby group Human Rights Campaign, the Trump-led White House is poised to “wildly expand anti-LGBTQ discrimination across all facets of government.”

“Discrimination” is common left-wing parlance, along with words such as “hate” and “bigotry,” for holding traditional views about marriage and sexuality.

What this memo accomplishes, says American Family Association spokesman Walker Wildmon, is prevent the federal government from “encroaching on the First Amendment rights of Americans of faith, and really it would keep the government from coercing people of faith to violate their religious beliefs.”

The fate of the memo in coming weeks is unknown, so Wildmon and AFA are asking Christian conservatives to sign their names to an online petition urging President Trump to sign the executive order. The petition has approximately 109,000 signatures.

Writing at The Daily Signal, researcher Ryan Anderson says the memo suggests protecting federal employees from punishment if they hold traditional views about marriage, citing the 1964 Civil Rights Act.

Such an executive order would conflict with the pro-homosexual propaganda of the Obama administration, which pushed such “progressive” views within the Department of Justice, the Pentagon, and other agencies.

Beyond the federal government, Ryan writes, the memo suggestsprotecting the nonprofit status of religious organizations that express views about political issues, marriage and sexuality, and abortion.

In all, Ryan writes, there are 10 suggestions outlined in the memo, many of them rolling back Obama-era executive orders that were applauded at the time by homosexual activists and abortion rights groups.

“The executive order is good, lawful public policy,” Ryan suggests in his commentary. “And it makes good on several promisesthen-candidate Trump made to his supporters.”

Wildmon says the petition is one way tell President Trump that “amongst the people who elected him, voted him into office, this executive order and things like it are very popular.”

American Family Association is the parent organization of American Family News, which includes news website OneNewsNow.

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DNA saves dog from death penalty – CNN

Posted: February 10, 2017 at 2:46 am

Jeb’s owners, Penny and Kenneth Job of St. Clair, Michigan, couldn’t believe that their sweet Jeb, the same gentle dog who helps Ken get up when he falls down, who lives peacefully with three other dogs, seven cats and a coopful of chickens, could ever harm another living being.

So the family used a forensic technique often used for human defendants to save their dog from death row last fall.

Jeb Stuart Job stands hip-high, with a muscular frame, big dark eyes and a long black snout. He’s had a rough two years on this Earth.

In January 2016, when he wasn’t quite a year old, he was found chained inside a shed in Detroit. His owner had died, and the rest of the family didn’t want him.

Kandie Morrison, a volunteer with a dog rescue agency, got the call.

Once Morrison met Jeb, she thought he’d make the perfect service dog for her father; that’s Kenneth Job.

Job, 79, an Air Force veteran who owned a drywall business, has a neurodegenerative disease called Charcot-Marie-Tooth. He fell in love with the Belgian Malinois puppy. Dr. Karen Pidick, their veterinarian and neighbor in their rural Michigan town, trained Jeb to help Job stay steady on his shaky legs.

The family was a happy one until eight months later.

According to court testimony, on the morning of August 24, the Jobs’ neighbor, Christopher Sawa, looked out his kitchen window and saw Jeb standing over the lifeless body of his own dog, Vlad.

Vlad weighed 14 pounds. Jeb weighed about 90 pounds.

Sawa ran out into his yard. He tried to give Vlad mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, but it was too late. The tiny Pomeranian was dead.

Sawa called animal control and blamed Jeb. Animal control took the big dog into custody.

On September 19, all parties gathered at district court in St. Clair County.

If Judge Michael Hulewicz deemed Jeb a “dangerous animal,” the dog would be put to death.

Sawa, the Jobs’ neighbor for more than 30 years, testified about finding Jeb standing over his dead Pomeranian.

“It was horrifying. It was terrifying,” he said, according to transcripts. CNN contacted the Sawas, who declined to comment.

He said it wasn’t the first time Jeb had scared him.

“I was afraid of the dog. The dog always barked,” he said.

Now, his beloved Vlad was gone.

“We’ve never had any children,” he testified. “The dog was like a child to us.”

Job testified that Jeb had indeed gotten away from him that morning: He and the Jobs’ other three dogs had run off in the opposite direction of the Sawa home, toward a house with a pond where they liked to swim.

The Jobs’ attorney, Edward Marshall, pointed to a lack of physical evidence linking Jeb to Vlad’s death and questioned whether another large animal had killed Vlad. After all, Pidick, the neighborhood vet, had testified that an unfriendly stray dog had been spotted in the neighborhood, and foxes were known to live in the surrounding woods.

In the end, the judge said Jeb met the legal definition of a dangerous animal, and he made what he said was a tough decision.

“I have no choice except to follow out the state law that the animal would be destroyed,” Hulewicz said. “I don’t like to do this. I don’t like it at all.”

That’s when the Job family asked to have testing done to see whether Jeb’s DNA matched the DNA in Vlad’s wound. They said they hadn’t asked for it sooner because they thought Vlad had been cremated and there would be no way to get his DNA.

But at the trial, it came out that Vlad’s body was in a freezer.

The Jobs arranged to have swabs taken from Vlad’s wound and the inside of Jeb’s cheek. The samples were sent to the Maples Center for Forensic Medicine at the University of Florida College of Medicine. The process cost $416, according to the Jobs.

On October 24, exactly two months after Jeb was taken into custody, AnnMarie Clark, a forensic DNA analyst at the center, sent in her findings: The DNA in the wound didn’t match Jeb’s DNA.

“Jeb is not the dog that killed (Vlad),” Clark wrote.

“We were relieved. We were absolutely relieved,” said Penny Job, Ken’s wife.

The DNA showed that another dog had killed Jeb, Clark told CNN — but exactly who that dog is may forever be a mystery.

Jeb was allowed to go home the following week, after his owners signed an agreement promising that they would make sure Jeb wouldn’t leave the yard unleashed and that they would maintain a secure fence to keep their animals in the yard.

The Jobs say Jeb came home a very different dog.

They say that during his nine weeks in animal control, he went from 90 to 75 pounds, and he became scared and skittish.

“The dog was thin and sick,” Penny Job said. “And he lost all his social skills. He was afraid to go outside.”

Jeb’s weight wasn’t taken when he entered and left animal control, said Steve Campau, a spokesman for the St. Clair County sheriff’s office, which oversees animal control.

“We fed him a meal day,” Campau said. “Maybe he was overfed at home.”

Campau also said some behavior changes are to be expected after an animal is released from spending nine weeks of spending 23 hours a day in a kennel that’s 6 feet long by 3 feet wide.

“Veterinarians say after a dog is in a kennel environment for an extended period of time, there’s certainly going to be an adjustment period when the dog gets out,” Campau said.

Even now, more than three months after his return home, Jeb is still scared of strange men, his owners say.

Still bitter that their innocent dog was nearly put to death, Jeb’s owners wonder why they had to come up with the idea of DNA analysis. Why didn’t the court do it before condemning Jeb to death? After all, that kind of testing is often done with human defendants.

Humans accused of a crime have rights under criminal due process.

“In a criminal prosecution, where you’re putting a person in jail, we have the highest level of protection,” Favre said.

It’s a different story with dogs.

“Dogs have no rights. They’re property,” Favre said.

He wonders whether courts should reconsider and make DNA analysis a regular part of the process when a dog’s life hangs in the balance.

“It’s an easy thing to do. We just haven’t thought of it in this context,” he said.

He applauds the Jobs for saving their pet.

“Now people will realize they can do this, that it’s a tool,” he said. “They used a very creative defense.”

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DNA saves dog from death penalty – CNN

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Russia calls Romania ‘a clear threat’ and NATO outpost: Ifax – Reuters

Posted: February 9, 2017 at 5:55 am

MOSCOW Russia views Romania as a NATO outpost and as a threat due to it hosting elements of a U.S. anti-missile shield, the Interfax news agency reported on Thursday, citing a Russian foreign ministry official.

The U.S. military, which says the shield is needed to protect from Iran, not threaten Russia, switched on the $800 million Romanian part of the shield in May last year. Another part of the shield is due to be built in Poland.

“Romania’s stance and the stance of its leadership, who have turned the country into an outpost, is a clear threat for us,” Alexander Botsan-Kharchenko, a senior Russian foreign ministry official, told Interfax in an interview.

“All these decisions … are in the first instance aimed against Russia,” he said, accusing Romanian authorities of reveling in anti-Russian rhetoric.

Moscow’s comments come as NATO deploys thousands of soldiers and heavy weaponry to Poland, the Baltic states and southeastern Europe, in its biggest buildup since the Cold War.

U.S. and NATO officials say the move is needed to provide extra security and reassurance to European countries after Russia’s 2014 annexation of Ukraine’s Crimea, but Russia says it is part of an aggressive strategy on its borders.

(Reporting by Andrew Osborn; Editing by Alexander Winning)

TOKYO Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will propose new cabinet level U.S.-Japan talks on trade, security and macroeconomic issues, including currencies, when he meets U.S. President Donald Trump on Friday, a Japanese government official involved in planning the summit said.

SEOUL Lawyers for South Korean President Park Geun-hye have rejected a plan by a special prosecutor investigating a graft scandal to question her, citing a media leak, a spokesman for the prosecutor’s office said on Thursday.

STOCKHOLM Eight countries have joined an initiative to raise millions of dollars to replace shortfalls caused by President Donald Trump’s ban on U.S.-funded groups around the world providing information on abortion, Sweden’s deputy prime minister said.

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Russia calls Romania ‘a clear threat’ and NATO outpost: Ifax – Reuters

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Censorship – The New York Times

Posted: June 29, 2016 at 6:17 pm

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Organizers said they werent told that the display would have a countdown to 2047, when Chinas promise of a high degree of autonomy for Hong Kong expires.

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Censorship – The New York Times

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Israel Demands World Internet Censorship – The New Observer

Posted: May 9, 2016 at 7:41 am

The Israeli Public Security Minister Gilad Erdan has unveiled plans to censor the Internets worldwide social media platforms with the building of an international coalition to counter criticism of Israel.

According to an article in the Times of Israel, Erdans plan calls for developing legislation in conjunction with European countries, most of which are very interested in this idea.

The legislation would have common features, such as defining what constitutes incitement and what the responsibilities of social networks regarding it are, a spokesman for the minister told the Israeli-based newspaper.

Companies that do not comply will find themselves hauled into court, paying a penalty, he added.

According to the plan, the participating countries would be part of a loose coalition that would keep an eye on content and where it was being posted, and members of the coalition would work to demand that the platforms remove the content that was posted in any of their countries at the request of members.

This is a perfectly logical and just project, Erdans spokesperson said. If a hotel was being used as a venue for a hate group, we would demand that the hotel break its contract, and we would lean on other hotels to abstain from hosting them, so that the hate group would not be able to hold its event. This is no different.

Although the Israelis are attempting to disguise the project as a counter to Palestinians posting violence promoting material on the Internet, it is clear that the extension of this coalition has a far wider scope.

Justifying the plan, Erdans office used an example of a Palestinian who allegedly posted up a body chart showing where the best places were to stab someone fatallyapparently a reference to the recent spate of knife attacks on Jews in Israel.

READ New Israeli Government Seeks to Seize West Bank Permanently

The number of postings of that nature are, however, tiny in comparison to the volume of material going up on the Internet, and there are already more than sufficient methods in place to deal with such incidents and get them removed.

Nonetheless, Erdans spokesman said the coalition would force the worlds leading social media giants to prevent their platforms from being abused to peddle incitement to terrorism.

The social media giants make millions but claim they are not responsible for content, and that they only provide a platform, a spokesperson for Erdan told the Times of Israel. That is not going to wash. We are planning to put a stop to this irresponsibility, and we are going to do it as part of an international coalition that has had enough of this behavior as well.

BreakingCensorshipFeaturedIsraelJewish HypocrisySocial Media

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As Scott Walker addresses NRA, concealed carry vote criticized

Posted: April 12, 2015 at 6:48 am

Gov. Scott Walkers vote against a concealed carry bill in 2002 resurfaced Friday as the likely presidential candidate addressed an annual convention of the National Rifle Association.

Democrats highlighted the vote which clashes with his otherwise lengthy record of supporting Second Amendment rights as yet another example of Walker shifting his position for political gain. The 2002 vote came just before Walker mounted a successful campaign for Milwaukee County executive.

But Walker spokeswoman Kirsten Kukowski countered that the reason Walker voted against the bill was because it came up after a lengthy late-night session and didnt follow the normal legislative process.

Gov. Walker was protecting the voters through transparency, Kukowski said. This is why the NRA has and continues to believe Gov. Walker stands up for Second Amendment rights, continually giving him good ratings year after year.

Walker didnt address his 2002 vote in his speech Friday, but highlighted how he has an A+ rating from the NRA as governor and had an A rating as a state legislator.

Im proud of that even though some on the left may say its a scarlet letter, Walker said in the speech. I say its a badge of honor.

The likely 2016 presidential contender has come under fire for shifting his position on various issues, including immigration, right-to-work, abortion, ethanol mandates and the Common Core education standards.

Add concealed carry to the list of issues Walker has changed his position on just to benefit himself, said Jason Pitt, a spokesman for the Democratic National Committee. If weve learned anything from Scott Walker over the past few months its that his constant pandering on issues has defined him as one of the least trustworthy candidates among the 2016 GOP field.

Kukowski said Walkers record of supporting the Second Amendment included:

Co-sponsoring a constitutional amendment in the late 1990s that added the right to keep and bear arms;

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As Scott Walker addresses NRA, concealed carry vote criticized

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Human remains found as search continues for 11 service members involved in helicopter crash

Posted: March 12, 2015 at 7:40 pm

Human remains wash ashore near a Florida military base after seven Marines and four soldiers in an Army helicopter crashed overnight during a training mission. (Reuters)

Human remains washed ashore Wednesday, as officials continued their search for seven Marines and four soldiers in waters off the Florida Panhandle, where a military helicopter had crashed during a training exercise.

We have confirmed that we have had some human remains wash ashore in the area where our search and rescue team have begun a larger scale operation,AndrewBourland, a spokesman for the Eglin Air Force Base, told The Washington Post.

Bourland also said that debris from the aircraft had been located.

The Army UH-60 Black Hawk is believed to have gone down in the water and foggy conditions were reported in the area at the time of the crash, though it is too soon to say what might have caused the mishap.

At a Wednesday afternoon news conference, Maj. Gen. GlennH.Curtis, the Adjutant General for the Louisiana National Guard, said the Black Hawk pilots had thousands of hours of flight experience and were instructor pilots, which indicates that they were experienced and qualified enough to train other pilots.

According to Curtis, it is one of the highest designations pilots in the Army can receive.

A second Black Hawk that participated in the exercise returned to base after take-off due to the weather conditions, Curtis said.That helicopter landed safely and all personnel on board were accounted for.

One of them started to take off and realized that theweather was a condition thenturned around and came back, said Curtis, who spoke from Hammond, La.

According to a Pentagon official who spoke anonymously to the Associated Pressnearly 12 hours after the craft was reported missing, all 11 service members are presumed dead.

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Human remains found as search continues for 11 service members involved in helicopter crash

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10 dead: Greek fighter jet crashes during NATO training – Video

Posted: January 29, 2015 at 9:49 pm



10 dead: Greek fighter jet crashes during NATO training
Ten people were killed and another 13 people were injured after a Greek fighter plane crashed during NATO training in Spain, a spokesman for the defence mini…

By: euronews (in English)

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Newark prostitution sting focuses on human trafficking

Posted: January 2, 2015 at 7:42 am

NEWARK, Del. When Newark Police and federal agents carried out a sting at a South College Avenue motel last month, they arrested seven men who allegedly thought they were meeting a prostitute.

However, the officers conducting the operation at the Rodeway Inn had their sights on a bigger target: human traffickers.

Such joint local and federal operations are a common tactic of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcements Homeland Security Investigations division as it seeks to crack down on human trafficking. Though the agency is better known for its immigration enforcement, ICEs HSI division is also responsible for investigating child pornography, sex trafficking and other similar offenses.

Human sex trafficking is defined as prostitution induced by force, fraud or coercion. The victims sometimes children often make arrangements to be brought to the United States only to find themselves forced into prostitution. Other times, it involves young Americans from troubled backgrounds.

Its akin to modern-day slavery, said William Walker, assistant special agent in charge of HSI in Philadelphia.

The Dec. 18 sting in Newark was in response to recent complaints about prostitution at the Rodeway Inn, said Lt. Mark A. Farrall, a spokesman for the Newark Police Department.

After posting ads online, undercover officers used phone calls and text messages to communicate with 22 men, seven of whom showed up at the motel and were charged with patronizing a prostitute. Those charged include John Jarrell, 57; Bernard Racey, 44; Robert Fletcher, 22; Suprapto Bonari, 48; Jonathan Caine, 28; Aaron M. Johnson, 38; and James L. Poston, 45. Police withheld the defendants hometowns for unspecified reasons.

An HSI agent accompanied Newark Police during the sting and helped conduct interviews of the suspects, looking for red flag indicators of human trafficking. Similar operations have occurred in cities across the country, Walker said.

The basic idea, authorities said, is to lean on the accused to open up about any past involvement with prostitutes in an effort to get information that could lead to human trafficking rings.

We interview them and see if they can turn us on to any human trafficking victims theyve encountered in the past, Walker said.

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Newark prostitution sting focuses on human trafficking

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