Tag Archives: beach

Articles about Space Exploration – latimes

Posted: July 21, 2016 at 2:17 am

SCIENCE

July 18, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun

More than a hundred explorers, scientists and government officials will gather at Long Beach’s Aquarium of the Pacific on Friday to draft a blueprint to solve a deep blue problem: About 95% of the world’s oceans remains unexplored. The invitation-only forum , hosted by the aquarium and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, aims to identify priorities, technologies and collaborative strategies that could advance understanding of the uncharted mega-wilderness that humans rely on for oxygen, food, medicines, commerce and recreation.

SCIENCE

June 12, 2013 | By Brad Balukjian

Dancer , rapper , and, oh yeah, Man on the Moon Buzz Aldrin is talking, but are the right people listening? One of the original moonwalkers (Michael Jackson always did it backwards! Aldrin complained) challenged the United States to pick up the space slack Tuesday evening, mere hours after China sent three astronauts into orbit. Speaking in front of a friendly crowd of 880 at the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum in Yorba Linda, Aldrin criticized the U.S. for not adequately leading the international community in space exploration, and suggested that we bump up our federal investment in space while still encouraging the private sector’s efforts.

ENTERTAINMENT

February 2, 2013 | By Holly Myers

It will come as news to many, no doubt, that there is a Warhol on the moon. And a Rauschenberg and an Oldenburg – a whole “Moon Museum,” in fact, containing the work of six artists in all, in the form of drawings inscribed on the surface of a ceramic chip roughly the size of a thumbprint. Conceived by the artist Forrest Myers in 1969, the chip was fabricated in collaboration with scientists at Bell Laboratories and illicitly slipped by a willing engineer between some sheets of insulation on the Apollo 12 lander module.

WORLD

January 29, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Ramin Mostaghim, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.

BEIRUT – U.S. officials are not exactly welcoming Iran’s revelation this week that the Islamic Republic has sent a monkey into space and brought the creature back to Earth safely. The report by Iranian media recalled for many the early days of space flight, when both the United States and the Soviet Union launched animal-bearing spacecraft as a prelude to human space travel. But State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland told reporters in Washington on Monday that the reported mission raises concerns about possible Iranian violations of a United Nations ban on development of ballistic missiles capable of delivering nuclear weapons.

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL

December 22, 2012 | By Scott Gold, Los Angeles Times

WATERTON CANYON, Colo. – The concrete-floored room looks, at first glance, like little more than a garage. There is a red tool chest, its drawers labeled: “Hacksaws. ” “Allen wrenches. ” There are stepladders and vise grips. There is also, at one end of the room, a half-built spaceship, and everyone is wearing toe-to-fingertip protective suits. “Don’t. Touch. Anything. ” Bruce Jakosky says the words politely but tautly, like a protective father – which, effectively, he is. Jakosky is the principal investigator behind NASA’s next mission to Mars, putting him in the vanguard of an arcane niche of science: planetary protection – the science of exploring space without messing it up. PHOTOS: Stunning images of Earth at night As NASA pursues the search for life in the solar system, the cleanliness of robotic explorers is crucial to avoid contaminating other worlds.

SCIENCE

December 6, 2012 | By Amina Khan and Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times

Years of trying to do too many things with too little money have put NASA at risk of ceding leadership in space exploration to other nations, according to a new report that calls on the space agency to make wrenching decisions about its long-term strategy and future scope. As other countries – including some potential adversaries – are investing heavily in space, federal funding for NASA is essentially flat and under constant threat of being cut. Without a clear vision, that fiscal uncertainty makes it all the more difficult for the agency to make progress on ambitious goals like sending astronauts to an asteroid or Mars while executing big-ticket science missions, such as the $8.8-billion James Webb Space Telescope, says the analysis released Wednesday by the National Research Council.

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Articles about Space Exploration – latimes

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Offshore Drilling and Exploration – The New York Times

Posted: July 16, 2016 at 11:15 pm

Latest Articles

The rules fell short of many environmentalists demands to cut off such drilling entirely, but oil companies complained that they would stymie exploration.

By CORAL DAVENPORT

The all-stock deal, worth $13 billion, would combine the American and French companies, which have been hit hard by the global plunge in energy prices.

By STANLEY REED

Long a ticket to the middle class, especially for African-Americans, they have become increasingly difficult to find.

By ANNIE LOWREY

The regulations are aimed at preventing the kind of failures that caused the disastrous 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico and come amid a proposal for Arctic drilling.

By CORAL DAVENPORT

The Obama administration has hopes that gas export efforts will help build peaceful relations between Israel and its neighbors in the Middle East.

By ISABEL KERSHNER and STANLEY REED

The decision to postpone the plan, called Browse, comes as prices for the fuel in Asia have fallen steeply.

Interior Secretary Sally Jewell cited the militarys reservations about drilling near some of its largest installations, plunging oil prices and widespread local concerns.

By CORAL DAVENPORT

The Obama administration yielded to opposition from coastal communities from Virginia to Georgia but dashed the hopes of many of those states leaders.

By CORAL DAVENPORT

The realization is adding momentum to efforts to convert some of the platforms into artificial reefs once they are decommissioned.

By ERIK OLSEN

Environmentalists disagree over whether outdated oil rigs off the coast of Long Beach, Calif., can become an addition to the marine ecosystem.

By ERIK OLSEN

Many coastal residents, fearing a repeat of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, see potential disaster, while those inland speak of economic opportunity.

By CORAL DAVENPORT

Paragon Offshore, which operates offshore drilling rigs from the Gulf of Mexico to the North Sea, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.

By MICHAEL CORKERY

While the dispute raised tensions between the neighbors, it did not approach levels seen in 2014, when anti-China demonstrations turned into deadly riots.

By MIKE IVES

The rig was at the center of a standoff between the countries in May 2014.

One worker on the drilling rig was killed, and two others were injured.

Opening the taps in the Corrib field is a breakthrough for the oil and gas industry in Ireland, which had mostly disappointing results in recent years.

By STANLEY REED

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu authorized a long-delayed deal with an American-Israeli partnership that is expected to turn the country into an energy exporter.

By ISABEL KERSHNER and STANLEY REED

Workers have been evacuated, but one of two lifeboats capsized in rough seas, leaving 29 people missing and presumed dead.

By ANDREW E. KRAMER

The Southern Environmental Law Center calls on President Obama to reconsider plans to open the coast to oil and gas drilling.

The Interior Department also rejected appeals by Shell and Statoil, the Norwegian oil giant, to extend existing Arctic leases.

By CLIFFORD KRAUSS

The rules fell short of many environmentalists demands to cut off such drilling entirely, but oil companies complained that they would stymie exploration.

By CORAL DAVENPORT

The all-stock deal, worth $13 billion, would combine the American and French companies, which have been hit hard by the global plunge in energy prices.

By STANLEY REED

Long a ticket to the middle class, especially for African-Americans, they have become increasingly difficult to find.

By ANNIE LOWREY

The regulations are aimed at preventing the kind of failures that caused the disastrous 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico and come amid a proposal for Arctic drilling.

By CORAL DAVENPORT

The Obama administration has hopes that gas export efforts will help build peaceful relations between Israel and its neighbors in the Middle East.

By ISABEL KERSHNER and STANLEY REED

The decision to postpone the plan, called Browse, comes as prices for the fuel in Asia have fallen steeply.

Interior Secretary Sally Jewell cited the militarys reservations about drilling near some of its largest installations, plunging oil prices and widespread local concerns.

By CORAL DAVENPORT

The Obama administration yielded to opposition from coastal communities from Virginia to Georgia but dashed the hopes of many of those states leaders.

By CORAL DAVENPORT

The realization is adding momentum to efforts to convert some of the platforms into artificial reefs once they are decommissioned.

By ERIK OLSEN

Environmentalists disagree over whether outdated oil rigs off the coast of Long Beach, Calif., can become an addition to the marine ecosystem.

By ERIK OLSEN

Many coastal residents, fearing a repeat of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, see potential disaster, while those inland speak of economic opportunity.

By CORAL DAVENPORT

Paragon Offshore, which operates offshore drilling rigs from the Gulf of Mexico to the North Sea, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.

By MICHAEL CORKERY

While the dispute raised tensions between the neighbors, it did not approach levels seen in 2014, when anti-China demonstrations turned into deadly riots.

By MIKE IVES

The rig was at the center of a standoff between the countries in May 2014.

One worker on the drilling rig was killed, and two others were injured.

Opening the taps in the Corrib field is a breakthrough for the oil and gas industry in Ireland, which had mostly disappointing results in recent years.

By STANLEY REED

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu authorized a long-delayed deal with an American-Israeli partnership that is expected to turn the country into an energy exporter.

By ISABEL KERSHNER and STANLEY REED

Workers have been evacuated, but one of two lifeboats capsized in rough seas, leaving 29 people missing and presumed dead.

By ANDREW E. KRAMER

The Southern Environmental Law Center calls on President Obama to reconsider plans to open the coast to oil and gas drilling.

The Interior Department also rejected appeals by Shell and Statoil, the Norwegian oil giant, to extend existing Arctic leases.

By CLIFFORD KRAUSS

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Offshore Drilling and Exploration – The New York Times

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Ascension (TV Mini-Series 2014) – Full Cast & Crew – IMDb

Posted: July 1, 2016 at 9:48 pm

Tricia Helfer …

Viondra Denniger (3 episodes, 2014)

Dr. Juliet Bryce (3 episodes, 2014)

Aaron Gault (3 episodes, 2014)

Nora Bryce (3 episodes, 2014)

Emily Vanderhaus (3 episodes, 2014)

Katherine Warren (3 episodes, 2014)

Christa Valis (3 episodes, 2014)

Lorelei Wright (3 episodes, 2014)

Jackie (3 episodes, 2014)

Eva Marceau (3 episodes, 2014)

Ophelia (3 episodes, 2014)

Presley Delon (3 episodes, 2014)

(2 episodes, 2014)

New Stewardess (2 episodes, 2014)

Laura Enzmann (2 episodes, 2014)

Orderly (2 episodes, 2014)

Young Gault Mom / … (2 episodes, 2014)

Mid-Level Student / … (2 episodes, 2014)

Doug Bodwin (2 episodes, 2014)

(1 episode, 2014)

Deborah Fermi (1 episode, 2014)

Timothy Fermi (1 episode, 2014)

Susan Carr (1 episode, 2014)

Paul Carr (1 episode, 2014)

Marilyn Wright (1 episode, 2014)

Security Officer (1 episode, 2014)

Samantha Munoz (1 episode, 2014)

Alfred Munoz (1 episode, 2014)

Playful Slap Officer (1 episode, 2014)

Christa’s Mom (1 episode, 2014)

Machine Shop Foreman (1 episode, 2014)

Orderly #2 (1 episode, 2014)

Young Gault (1 episode, 2014)

Abraham’s Nurse (1 episode, 2014)

Rhonda (1 episode, 2014)

Scott (1 episode, 2014)

Tech in White (1 episode, 2014)

Young Opelia (1 episode, 2014)

Security Guard (1 episode, 2014)

Mitchell Egland (1 episode, 2014)

New Stewardess (1 episode, 2014)

Skrillex Employee (1 episode, 2014)

Pharmacist (1 episode, 2014)

Student #2 (1 episode, 2014)

Student #3 (1 episode, 2014)

Student #4 (1 episode, 2014)

Lower Deck Worker (1 episode, 2014)

Lower Deck Worker (1 episode, 2014)

Woman in Tears (1 episode, 2014)

Beach Girl (1 episode, 2014)

Stewardess (1 episode, 2014)

Student (1 episode, 2014)

Poker Player #3 (uncredited) (1 episode, 2014)

Poker Player #2 (uncredited) (1 episode, 2014)

Stockyard Worker (uncredited) (1 episode, 2014)

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Ascension (TV Mini-Series 2014) – Full Cast & Crew – IMDb

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Seychelles Holidays | Hotels & Island Hopping | Seyvillas.com

Posted: June 27, 2016 at 6:33 am

Discounts and Special Offers*

Valid in travel period: 17.06.2016 – 06.07.2016Minimum stay 3 nights

Valid in travel period: 01.01.2015 – 31.10.2016, 01.01.2017 – 31.12.2017Not valid in travel period: 01.10.2017 – 30.11.2017, 01.03.2017 – 30.05.2017

Valid in travel period: 01.04.2016 – 31.07.2016, 01.01.2017 – 31.12.2017

Experience Package (subject to availability, valid year-round, minimum stay: 4 nights after which standard prices apply, prices based on double occupancy, with half-board): – Local welcome drink. – La Belle Tortue’s daily dinner experience. – Creole cooking lesson with the Belle Tortue chef. – Discover local spices, fruits and trees during a walk. – Coconut-themed workshop OR a local fishing experience. Special prices per night (for 2 guests, including half board): Lodge room: 420 (high season) / 340 (low season). Varangue room: 480 (high season) / 430 (low season). Anne Dieu-le-veut Villa: 610 (high season) / 570 (low season).

Family offer (subject to availability, chosen room category and seasonal rate): – Free meals for under-12s. – 50% discount on boat transfers. – Book two lodge rooms, get a 50% discount on the second room. – Book suite and children stay for free in the lounge. – Book private villa and children stay for free, and the lounge is free. Valid: May-September and Christmas period (18th December 28th December 2015).

Fishing Package: – One day fishing on the Belle Tortue boat. – Includes picnic and fishing. – Cookery course on how to prepare the catch of the day. – Dinner, where you eat your catch. Special prices per night (subject to availability, minimum stay: 4 nights after that, standard prices apply): Lodge room: 530 (high season) / 450 (low season). Varangue room: 600 (high season) / 540 (low season). Anne Dieu-le-veut Villa: 750 (high season) / 710 (low season).

Romantic package:(upon availability, valid all year, minimum stay: 4 nights, after which standard prices apply, half board) – Bottle of champagne. – Candlelight dinner. – Romantic picnic on the beach. Special prices per night (subject to availability, booked on half board, minimum stay: 4 nights after that, standard prices apply): Lodge room: 420 (high season) / 340 (low season). Varangue room: 490 (high season) / 430 (low season). Anne Dieu-le-veut Villa: 640 (high season) / 600 (low season). Valid all year-round.

San Valentine’s Special Day: special present available on site for the couples staying at La Belle Tortue on the 14th February 2016

*The offers are automatically calculated in the final price.

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Seychelles Holidays | Hotels & Island Hopping | Seyvillas.com

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Caribbean Travel

Posted: at 6:32 am

Riviera Maya

Tee off with complimentary greens when you stay at Dreams Puerto Aventuras. Every day…

St Lucia

Razmataz offering 40 dollar Friday, all main meat & fish curries only EC$40. Dining in…

Cancun

Spoil Yourself & Repeat at the Spa by Pevonia. When you reserve the Spoil Yourself &…

St Kitts and Nevis

Make “volcanic” memories on an incomparable adventure to Montserrat, known as the…

Barbados

A variety of Specials are being offered on our website – http://www.worthingcourt.com. Please…

Jamaica

Looking to get away with your group? We have the perfect deal for you! Book five…

Curacao

Skip the hustle and bustle of your next vacation and share in the indulgence of the…

United States Virgin Islands

Secret Harbour Beach Resort – 4th Quarter Bonus! Plan Ahead For Some Well-Deserved…

Riviera Maya

Have a night out and enjoy the Sip, Savor & See Dining Experience by visiting a nearby…

Tulum

Spoil Yourself & Repeat at the Spa by Pevonia at Dreams Tulum! With this package you…

Riviera Maya

Looking to get away with your group? We have the perfect deal for you at Now Sapphire!…

Cozumel

Skip the hustle and bustle of your next vacation and share in the indulgence of the…

Tulum

Enjoy the Sip, Savor & See Dining Experience where you can sip artfully prepared…

United States Virgin Islands

Secret Harbour Beach Resort – Limited Offer! Spend 3 Or More Nights In Paradise…

Riviera Maya

Enjoy a night out with the Sip, Savor & See Dining Experience and visit any nearby…

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Caribbean Travel

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Offshore Theater | Free HD Surf Cameras California Hawaii

Posted: June 25, 2016 at 10:58 am

FADE TO PURPLE | MATT MELOA >> WATCH NOW

[FADE TO PURPLE | MATT MELOA]

[CANARY ISLANDS / SURFING LANZAROTE]

[HURLEY YOUTH: BARRON MAMIYA]

[JOHN JOHNS MASSIVE MARGIES AIR]

[TROPICAL VIBES IN PANAMA]

[HELP ETHIOPIAS 1ST SKATEPARK]

[SHAPER SHOWCASE: THIRD WORLD SURF CO.]

[JOHN PERRY JVP SURFBOARDS]

[HELP ETHIOPIAS 1ST SKATEPARK]

[2015 STILL FROTHY SURF FESTIVAL]

[2015 BILLABONG PRO TAHITI C.J. SHINES AND FLORES ON FIRE]

[CURT THE GROM WHO NEVER GREW UP]

[WAVE OF THE WINTER DOCUMENTARY]

I’d just like to offer my compliments towards this site. It’s functional, it’s responsive, and the quality of the cameras are outstanding. Without a doubt, OffshoreTheatre.com has enhanced my surfing experience on the central coast

Colin, San Luis Obispo

When the sun goes down in California it’s nice to be able to click and continue seeing the beach where ever the sun may be at the time. I think your site is one of the best I’ve seen. Maintain the superior quality Offshore Theater.

Michael, Tennessee

We love Offshore Theater and look at it everyday. We travel to Pismo Beach from Woodland hills, CA and have been to all the beaches.

James, Woodland Hills, CA

Just a quick note to let you know how much I love your web cams. I check out web cams all over the U.S. and places I’ve traveled to the previous summer and rate yours the best. Thanks Offshore Theater!

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Offshore Theater | Free HD Surf Cameras California Hawaii

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Liberal legal definition of liberal – Legal Dictionary

Posted: June 21, 2016 at 6:46 am

The salon d’Esgrignon represented the upper aristocracy (the returning Troisvilles attached themselves to it); the Cormon salon represented, under the clever influence of du Bousquier, that fatal class of opinions which, without being truly liberal or resolutely royalist, gave birth to the 221 on that famous day when the struggle openly began between the most august, grandest, and only true power, ROYALTY, and the most false, most changeful, most oppressive of all powers,–the power called PARLIAMENTARY, which elective assemblies exercise. this paragraph refers to controversies, before the French “July Revolution” of 1830, between rightist (“cote droit” = right side) legitimists, who read the official “Moniteur” newspaper and supported the absolutist Bourbon monarchy of King Charles X, and leftist (“cote gauche” = left side) liberals, who read “Le Temps” and argued for reform or revolution; “nothing good could come of Nazareth” = from the Bible, John, I, 46: “Can any good thing come out of Nazareth”} He served out some grog with a liberal hand, And bade them sit down on the beach: And they could not but own that their Captain looked grand, As he stood and delivered his speech. Having a little time upon my hands, I resolved to gratify a liberal curiosity by making a trip thither. I infinitely prefer the tender and liberal spirit of Mainwaring, which, impressed with the deepest conviction of my merit, is satisfied that whatever I do must be right; and look with a degree of contempt on the inquisitive and doubtful fancies of that heart which seems always debating on the reasonableness of its emotions. The liberal military code makes provision for hanging many kinds of persons, and gentlemen are not excluded. Therefore measure not thine advancements, by quantity, but frame them by measure: and defer not charities till death; for, certainly, if a man weigh it rightly, he that doth so, is rather liberal of another man’s, than of his own. But for the world’s opinion those experiences would have been simply a liberal education. Having already sufficiently considered the general principles of this subject, let us now go into the practical part thereof; the one is a liberal employment for the mind, the other necessary. But when at an election the Liberals had written on his garden fence in large blue letters: This way to Rome, he had been very angry, and threatened to prosecute the leaders of the Liberal party in Blackstable. Liberalism has just as much right to exist as has the most moral conservatism; but I am attacking RUSSIAN liberalism; and I attack it for the simple reason that a Russian liberal is not a Russian liberal, he is a non-Russian liberal. Now those vague liberal dreams with which the Emperor Alexander had ascended the throne, and which he had tried to put into effect with the aid of his associates, Czartoryski, Novosiltsev, Kochubey, and Strogonov- whom he himself in jest had called his Comite de salut public- were taking shape and being realized.

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Liberal legal definition of liberal – Legal Dictionary

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The Danger and Bounty of the Minerva Reefs

Posted: at 6:45 am

Story and photos by Scott & Wendy Bannerot.

Few South Pacific voyagers miss a stop at the Kingdom of Tonga. The Vava’u Group attracts the highest number of visiting boats, with deep, protected passageways between a large cluster of picturesque islands, permitting relaxed cruising among lovely, sheltered anchorages. A growing number of boats venture south into the lower-lying, coral-strewn Ha’apai Group, and a steady annual proportion sail onward to the country’s southernmost main island of Tongatapu for a stop at the capital town of Nuku’alofa. There they provision and procure New Zealand visas from the consulate before heading south to escape the November onset of cyclone season. By this time nearly all have heard of North and South Minerva Reefs, two rings of nearly submerged coral lying some 270 nautical miles southwest of Tongatapu, somewhat to the west of the rhumb line to New Zealand.

This position, and the existence of navigable passes into the protected inner lagoons of both atolls, plays on various portions of a seafarer’s brain. No one wants to hear the roar of breakers dead ahead on a dark, stormy night or feel the crunching lurch of your hull piling forcibly onto a solid piece of real estate in mid-ocean. On the other hand, many dream of anchoring alone in tranquil, gin-clear lagoons teeming with sea life for a restful break during a passage, or of riding out a severe storm on the hook, protected from the brunt of the conditions by solid walls of coral. We were no different from anyone else, having made two passages between Tonga and New Zealand without laying eyes on either of the Minervas. By the time our third passage was imminent, we knew a stop was inevitable.

We’d arrived in Tonga’s Vava’u Group again after 18 months in New Zealand, including a four-month return to the U.S. for medical and business issues that could no longer be ignored. During this time our 41-foot aluminum sloop Elan awaited us on an Auckland hardstand. Our first time through Vava’u, nearly two years before, had been late in the winter sailing season. We’d spent only one short week before the looming storm season compelled us to set sail. We knew we hadn’t scratched the surface of what this group of islands had to offer, and our determination to do it justice on the second time around was strong. We’d sailed up the eastern quadrant of a fortuitously stalled high, fanned by southeasterlies coming over the starboard quarter on a direct 10-day shot from Auckland to Neiafu. We cleared customs one hour before my sister, her husband, and her father-in-law arrived at the airport on a long-planned visit from Wyoming. Our spirits soared as we loaded everyone’s gear aboard and made ready to cast off from the fuel dock.

Ambitious plans to visit Fiji and Vanuatu fell by the wayside as two other couples came out to visit, we were adopted by several local families, and we accepted an invitation to participate on a local fishing boat in the annual billfish tournament. Before we knew it, we’d been in Vava’u’s calm embrace for nearly the entire South Pacific winter. We’d had countless wonderful days, exploring Swallow’s and Mariner’s caves, photographing a mother humpback whale and her calf swimming laconically beside Elan, and spending time under and above water with some very special people and marine life. Suddenly the October spring window for the voyage back to New Zealand was upon us.

We fished and dived our way south through the Ha’apai and Nomuka Groups, and arrived in Nuku’alofa after an easy overnight sail. There we consolidated our crew with Kiwi friends Ken Kiddie and Hans Swete, who’d earlier committed to the trip south as a way of gaining their first offshore passage. The four of us plotted and dreamed about a stop at the Minervas over cold beers at Nuku’alofa’s waterfront Billfish Bar, and we kept a sharp eye out for an appropriate weather window.

As if on cue, the progression of strong winter highs passing by to the south of us slowed and settled, and on a sparkling sunny afternoon we picked our way around Atata Island, out the channel through the reef, and set a course for North Minerva Reef.

The mystique of the Minervas Elan’s hull bit into the ocean swell under full genoa and mainsail, close reaching into light south-southeasterly conditions. The trolling lines went out, and the conversation turned quickly to stories about the Minervas-boats that had survived the infamous Queen’s Birthday and lesser storms anchored inside the reefs; shipwrecks and disappearances, either documented or suspected, in the vicinity of the reefs; and reports of abundant fish and lobsters, and of an unspoiled environment little-disturbed by humans.

Capt. H. M. Denham, aboard the H.M.S. Herald, surveyed the reefs in 1854 and named them after the whaling ship Minerva, wrecked on South Minerva after setting out from Sydney in 1829. The captain of the Minerva was not aware of a large, poorly defined area called Nicholson’s shoals added to Pacific charts not long before departure, and was therefore quite surprised when the brig drove up hard on the reef at 0200 on September 9. Most of the 23-man crew, and a dog, made it from the wreck to the inner lagoon aboard two whaleboats, but the drunken whaling master and two crew refused to leave the wreck, despite the fact that it was under siege from heavy breaking seas. They survived the night lashed to the bowsprit of the broken hull, and the entire complement set sail the following day aboard three whaleboats loaded with water caskets and what provisions they could salvage from the wreck. One boat began leaking seriously, prompting one of the two remaining boats to sail off to save themselves. The remaining whaleboat eventually took aboard the entire crew of the sinking boat for a total of 15 men and the dog, leaving only six inches or so of freeboard. The desperate castaways, out of fresh water and food, sighted the island of Vatoa, an outlier of Fiji’s Lau Group, on September 15 and reached the outer reef, making their way ashore after splintering the whaleboat on the coral. Eight of the men remained with the friendly locals, and seven repaired the whaleboat and set sail again only to wreck once more on a Tongan island before eventually making their way home to Sydney. The crew of the boat that hastily abandoned the doomed men was never seen again.

Another famous incident occurred on the maiden voyage of the wooden schooner Strathcona, sailing north soon after completion in Auckland in 1914, only to unexpectedly crash up onto South Minerva Reef on the sixth day of the voyage and break apart. The crew of 13 consolidated materials and constructed a raft to live aboard in the lagoon, and then the captain and three crew sailed the schooner’s launch north to the nearest inhabited island, Ono-i-Lau, Fiji. Meanwhile a rescue vessel from New Zealand found the survivors on the raft at South Minerva, as well as the rescuers returning aboard a Fijian cutter to save their crewmates.

Many other wrecks on the two reefs are mysteries, with hulls and remains noted by passing vessels at various times and no signs of survivors. One such wreck was a largely intact Japanese fishing vessel that appeared in 1960 on South Minerva, the crew apparently taken off safely by the crew of another fishing vessel, whom they were able to contact by radio. This wreck was to play a critical role in what remains one of the most incredible maritime survival tales in recent history.

The tragedy of the Tuaikaepau Tuaikaepau was a 51-foot wooden cutter completed in 1902 at the same Auckland boatyard that later built the Strathcona. On the night of July 7, 1962, she was bound from Nuku’alofa for a refit in New Zealand, booming along close-hauled in boisterous southeasterly conditions. Experienced captain David Fifita commanded the seven-man crew and 10 passengers, mostly amateur boxers looking to make some money in New Zealand. The vessel smashed onto the eastern side of South Minerva Reef at seven knots in the darkness. This started a 14-week odyssey that would see only 12 of the men survive.

The 17 Tongans took refuge in the Japanese fishing boat wreck, constructed an ingenious water-distillation plant, and fed themselves by walking the reef flat to fish and collect seafood. Finally on Saturday, October 7, with three men dead, conditions becoming increasingly desperate, and hopes of rescue long gone, Fifita, his son Sateki, and ship’s carpenter Tevita Uaisele embarked on an epic rescue mission in a small craft crudely fashioned (with no tools) from remains of the two wrecks. David set a course for due north, armed only with a compass, sextant, nautical almanac, and a crude chart engraved on a plank, and no way to measure time accurately. He navigated by sun shots and dead reckoning. By Wednesday they were out of food and water. On Thursday they managed to catch a seabird that landed on the tiller and drank its blood. They bypassed treacherous, reef-encircled Ono-i-Lau and Matuku, and at midnight the following Saturday, in greatly weakened condition, David calculated that it was time to head due west in hopes of reaching much larger Kandavu.

The mountainous profile of the eastern end of Kandavu jutted above the horizon at dawn, confirming David’s emergency navigation skills and filling the severely dehydrated, starving men with hope. They sailed cautiously toward the reef, only to have an oversized breaking swell toss the sturdy wooden craft crashing over the reef, throwing the occupants overboard and capsizing the boat. This left little choice but to attempt a swim against the tide to the tiny outlying island of Nmbia approximately 1.3 nautical miles away. David’s son disappeared two thirds of the way to shore. The two survivors dragged themselves up the beach, quenched their thirst with green coconuts, and hiked to a village to summon help for their crewmates back on South Minerva. After some confusion, word finally reached the Royal New Zealand Air Force station at Suva, and the commander ordered an immediate night flight Monday to drop supplies to the survivors on South Minerva, followed by a rescue via Sunderland flying boat the following morning. The supply flight likely saved the life of at least one of the weakened castaways, though one man had died the previous evening. Olaf Ruhen’s Minerva Reef (Halstead Press, Sydney, 1963) is a worthwhile, highly detailed account of the entire ordeal, and voyagers can pick up the brief recent account Minerva Reef by survivor Fine Feuiaki in Tongan bookstores (Friendly Islands Bookshop, Tonga, 1992). Overnight at North Minerva Thoughts of the imperiled voyagers before us prevailed as light, fluky winds had us motorsailing for parts of the second and third days of the passage. By the third evening the southeasterly breeze stiffened. We made good time under double-reefed genoa and mainsail, and at first light sighted the white line of breakers along the north side of North Minerva that had been painting a radar target during the pre-dawn hours. Soon after, the left outrigger bait disappeared in a splashing strike, and Ken worked a 22-pound bull mahi mahi (Coryphaena hippurus, also called dolphin or dorado) to the gaff. We made our way into the wide, easy pass in the northwest corner of the submerged atoll at 0900 in good light and dropped the anchor 20 feet down to the deep fine sand. Soon the dinghy was in the water and we all piled in for a free-diving expedition to a series of nearby coral heads.

We already had plenty of fish, so we did some sightseeing and looked around for lobsters under ledges and domes of coral. The area teemed with fish, flourishing with the near total absence of hook and line or other fishing effort. We spotted only two lobsters, both far under the coral and inaccessible, before heading out the pass for a dive on the outside reef. Here the visibility was nearly limitless, the coral vibrant and dense. An occasional small gray reef shark wagged lazily by the steep drop-off below us, none bothering to investigate the newcomers.

As we motored back in the pass, taking advantage of the countercurrent along the margin of the now outgoing tide, we noticed Elan’s mast swinging irregularly. Despite being inside the lagoon, the vessel was rolling. The shield of coral rubble on the reef crest was mostly submerged at this nearly high-tide stage, offering less opposition to wind-driven waves piling across the reef flat. The formerly placid lagoon now had a distinctly lumpy surface-plenty tenable, just not as comfortable.

We dined on fresh-grilled mahi mahi and turned in early, awakening to a thin overcast, slick calm morning. We decided to stow the dinghy, rig up some fishing lines, and make a slow, fuel-saving motorsail the 20-odd miles to South Minerva Reef. Hans bagged a school-sized yellowfin tuna, and we all enjoyed the sight of a small (150 pounds) blue marlin crashing the left outrigger bait, missing, then playfully grabbing a small tuna lure before leaping in a graceful arc to freedom. Exploring South Minerva A pack of hungry wahoo attacked our lures just off the northwest corner of South Minerva Reef. Their razor-sharp teeth luckily missed the monofilament leaders of our tuna/billfish lures before taking off, but not before one rocketed vertically, high above the deck with our hookless teaser clamped fleetingly in its jaws. We entered the pass, which was less distinct than North Minerva, but no problem if one follows the well-defined southwestern (right-hand) margin into the lagoon, avoiding the easily sighted coral heads as they crop up from time to time inside the lagoon. We picked our way around the inner rim of the lagoon, anchoring near a large, block-like aggregation of coral on the eastern side. This turned out to be the work of an Australian survey team. The location was not far from the site of the long-gone Japanese wreck used by the Tuaikaepau crew, and some boat remains were strewn in the area. We drank in the desolate seascape, barely punctuated by a jagged rim of reef. The muted hiss of breaking seas was the only sound as we tried to imagine being shipwrecked here for 14 weeks, surviving by foraging and by consuming tightly rationed portions of water, distilled with great daily effort, bearing the sorrow of watching crewmates slowly die, and somehow building a boat capable of a substantial bluewater passage-with no tools. Firing up the grill and the music system returned us to the present, and soon the aroma of sizzling marinated tuna steaks dominated our thoughts. We suspended the tuna carcass into the water from a rope tied to the port transom cleat and retired below for the meal-we’d done the same thing the night before with the mahi mahi carcass and found the rope cleanly severed in the morning. Just as we finished dinner, a loud splash accompanying a sudden lurch of the boat sent us all topside in time to see several gray reef sharks circling hungrily. We didn’t need the bright arch light to see the dark silhouettes against the light sand bottom in the bright reflected light of the full moon, gracefully gliding in ever-tighter circles, then swimming off, only to wheel around and swim straight back in. We fed them the carcass after taking a few photos. Two solid days of non-stop reef walking, free-diving, dinghy fishing, and lobster hunting proved South Minerva to be every bit as bountiful and spectacular as we’d dreamed. We caught three different species of spiny lobsters during daylight hours hiding in shallow lagoon coral heads, at least two of which characteristically spend their days at significant depths on the outer reef at most tropical Pacific locations. Normally these are caught only at night by walking the reef flat on certain moon phases. Giant clams (Tridacna), increasingly scarce in most Indo-Pacific locations due to overexploitation, were abundant, as were innumerable other reef denizens of every description-brilliant blue starfish; colorful tropical fish species and moray eels; sea urchins and sea cucumbers; rich and brilliantly hued corals; big fat groupers or coral trout (Variola louti) arrogantly patrolling the pass. This was a chance to enjoy the natural South Pacific in all of its splendor, virtually unaltered by the strains humans exert on the planet. It was a good thing Ken and Hans were along, with the pressures of land jobs and responsibilities never far from mind. Otherwise our euphoria might have sorely tempted us to delay a prudently timed voyage southward. This trip should be made before tropical lows begin abutting to subtropical highs, spawning the hurricane-force easterlies not uncommon in later November and December in the vicinity of New Zealand’s North Island. So, at noon on the third day after arriving, we exited the pass in calm, sunny weather, with the weatherfax showing favorable timing for a jaunt south, with the exception of one mild low developing in the Tasman Sea. We paused outside the pass long enough to do some deep-dropping with an electric fishing reel, catching a couple of delicious groupers from as deep as 750 feet. The low gave us light northerlies and was not showing signs of deepening, so we finished securing the deck and set sail for New Zealand at 1700. Heading south We’d had two fast, uneventful previous passages between Tonga and New Zealand but were no less mindful of the possibility of experiencing heavy conditions. The moon loomed huge and orange out of the sea off the port quarter on the first night, making the ocean surface glimmer. We caught a cow mahi mahi of about 13 pounds the next afternoon and entered the scattered deluges and shifting wind directions of the still-weak low the following afternoon. The center of the low passed below us before sunset, and we’d never seen more than 22 knots of wind. Favorable winds from light to not more than 25 knots settled in for the remainder of the passage. We fished two billfish lures during daylight hours and caught and released both a rare shortbill spearfish and a striped marlin on successive days. Two days north of our destination a pod of (mammal) dolphin came alongside, immediately followed by a modest-sized marlin blasting onto the teaser and a big strike on the right outrigger lure, which turned out to be a 70-pound-class yellowfin tuna. With that we retired the fishing rods and concentrated on making maximum speed over the last 250 nautical miles to Opua, rather than hover in what might be fairly termed the “screw-up zone” for this particular passage. Many crews tend to relax a little early, knowing they’ve nearly made it, only to get a pasting when the bottom drops out of a low as it passes over warm ocean currents just above the North Island.

We sailed into Opua exactly seven days after departing South Minerva Reef on a beautiful and sunny, though distinctly cool, late afternoon and retired to the quiet of the Kawakawa River anchorage after check-in.

Bright smiles lit the aft settee over hot soup and rum as we celebrated our good fortune, and the rarified afterglow of visiting a place as magnificent and remote as the Minerva Reefs.

Scott and Wendy Bannerot, based in New Zealand as they voyage the South Pacific, are the authors of The Cruiser’s Guide to Fishing, recently published by International Marine in Rockport, Maine.

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The Danger and Bounty of the Minerva Reefs

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Bahamas Vacation Packages & Travel Deals – Atlantis

Posted: at 6:43 am

*Savings of up to 50% per night. Savings listed are per night, dbl occ. for Beach Tower Terrace. Savings on other room categories may vary by tower and travel dates. Must be booked by 6/21/16 for travel 9/22/16 through 12/20/16. New bookings only.2 night min stay required.Weekend charges apply. Taxes, levies, fees, service charges, and mandatory gratuities are additional starting from $100 per night per room.Blackout dates apply. This offer is subject to availability and may be changed or cancelled without notice. Offer not combinable with any other offer listed at time of offer. Not applicable to groups.

1.Atlantis Dine, Drink & Play Pass is valid for new bookings only, persons 18 years and older and subject to a minimum stay of 2 nights. A maximum of one card will be issued per room. Complimentary inclusions include One Sushi & Sake Platter at Nobu, One Gold Rum flight including 4 tastings at 77 West, Discounted Golf after 1pm and Complimentary golf club rentals (Does not include Callaway golf balls). These inclusions are based on availability and applicable one per room, per stay with a max of two guests per room. Food and beverage components include tax and gratuities; advance reservations are not necessary, however, guests should check restaurant operating hours for availability as some establishments may not be open every day. Golf rates are per golfer ($115 cost, reg. $165). Must be 5 years of age or older. Golf rates are subject to change. Tee times may be reserved within 60 days of arrival by calling 242-363-6682 and are subject to availability. Atlantis Dine, Drink & Play Pass must be presented at each outlet at time of consumption. Packages are non-refundable, non-transferable and have no cash value. This offer is valid for new bookings made from 6/16/16 6/21/16. This offer begins for stays on or after 6/17/16 -12/20/16. Blackout dates apply: 11/23/16 11/25/16. Stays that cross the effective travel dates will not receive the resort credit for any portion of their stay. No credit will be provided for any unused components and are non-transferable. Not applicable to groups. Atlantis Dine, Drink & Play Pass is not applicable for bookings at the Harborside Resort or The Reef Atlantis. Not applicable for the Beach Tower All-Inclusive Experience. Offer is only applicable on reservation earning Marriott Rewards points and is not applicable on reservations booked using Marriott Rewards points.

2.RESORT CREDIT: Royal Towers resort credit is $200 per room, per stay. The Cove Atlantis resort credit is $300 per room, per stay. Resort Credit is only valid for new bookings and is subject to a 3 night minimum stay. Resort credit is a one-time credit and applicable per room per stay. This offer is valid for new bookings only made from 6/16/16-6/21/16. The Resort credit offer is available for stays beginning on 6/16/16 and ending on 1/2/17. Stays that cross the effective travel dates will not receive the Resort credit for any portion of their stay. Resort credit cannot be used towards the cost of the room. Credit begins on the date of arrival and expires upon checkout. No credit will be issued for any unused amount. 2 bedroom suites are considered 1 room for purposes of this offer. This offer has no cash value. Resort credit may be used for Dolphin & Marine Adventures, Atlantis Kids Adventures, CRUSH, Atlantis Pals, Atlantis Speedway, Atlantis LIVE performances, internet service or select food and beverage outlets. Resort credit may not be used for laundry service or at any of the following outlets: Mandara Spa, Ocean Club Golf Course, the Casino, Marina Starbucks, Quizno’s, the Atlantis Signature shops or any other retail shops. It may not be used on gratuities for food and beverage consumption, in-room movies or phone calls, transportation/transfers, or taxes and Energy Surcharges. Resort credit is not applicable for bookings at the Harborside Resort or The Reef Atlantis. Not applicable for the Beach Tower All-Inclusive Experience. Offer is only applicable on reservation earning Marriott Rewards points and is not applicable on reservation booked using Marriott Rewards points.

3. Beverage credit and 50% off meal plans are for new bookings only. To view full Terms & Conditions for Dining Plans & Beverage CreditClick Here

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Bahamas Vacation Packages & Travel Deals – Atlantis

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Ascension – Wikitravel

Posted: at 6:41 am

Ascension

Ascension Island is an island in the Atlantic Ocean, just south of the equator, 700 miles northwest of Saint Helena, the United Kingdom territory by which it is administered.

The main settlement and “capital” is Georgetown where the tourist information office is in the Obsidian Hotel (see “Sleep” section).

This barren and uninhabited island was discovered and named by the Portuguese in 1501. The British garrisoned the island in 1815 to prevent a rescue of Napoleon from Saint Helena and it served as a provisioning station for the Royal Navy’s West Africa Squadron on anti-slavery patrol. The island remained under Admiralty control until 1922, when it became a dependency of Saint Helena. During World War II, the UK permitted the US to construct Wideawake airfield on Ascension in support of trans-Atlantic flights to Africa and anti-submarine operations in the South Atlantic. In the 1960s the island became an important space tracking station for the US. In 1982, Ascension was an essential staging area for British forces during the Falklands War, and it remains a critical refuelling point in the air-bridge from the UK to the South Atlantic.

The climate on Ascension Island is subtropical. It is arid and lacking in vegetation until the elevation increases where lush forest and fertile soil exists.

The tourist information office is in the Obsidian Hotel (see Sleep).

All visitors must apply for an entry permit in advance (minimum 14 days). An Entry Permit issued by the Administrator’s office allows a stay of up to 3 months. Passports must be valid for a minimum period of 6 months from the date of entry into Ascension, and visitors must also have full medical insurance which will cover the expense of medical evacuation, if needed.

There is no public transport (including taxis) on Ascension. Obsidian offers car rentals from 25/day.

Sport fishing is the main attraction for visitors to Ascension Island. There are also some beaches and ocean swimming in certain coves, such as Comfortless Cove and English Bay. Long Beach, as inviting as it looks, has a very hazardous undertow and is not suitable for sea bathing. However, it is a sheer delight for wildlife fans as this is where sea turtles go to nest. There are a few paths (such as Rupert’s Path) suitable for hiking into the more lush highlands, as well as mountainside lava tubes to explore. The British pastime of letterboxing – hiking to a destination that contains a “letterbox” containing a log book and a rubber stamp pad – is possible here.

Ascension Island features what was at one time reputed to be the world’s worst golf course. Located between the settlements of Two Boats village and Georgetown, the course has 18 holes and the greens are in fact ‘browns’, a reference to the sand and oil mix used to make them. The rest of the course is made up of volcanic ash and rock, which makes for some interesting rounds.

There is some terrific Scuba Diving in the waters surrounding Ascension Island. At present, however, there are only local enthusiasts and no recognized Diving Operation. Some of locals are often willing to take experienced visitors with them

There are Fumaroles and Lava Tunnels to explore (at Command Hill, near the Catholic Grotto)

The grocery store and almost every other business on the island have really odd hours of operation.(the gas station on Tuesdays is open 2-3 in the afternoon) so make sure you write up the times on the first day. The Obsidian Hotel has a nice gift shop with some good books and beach vacation-style t-shirts.

Because everything is imported prices for food are very high on the island. If you get the chance to go out fishing with the locals, you may walk away with a bag of tuna. Sometimes the community hosts a fish fry that is open to everyone.

There are very few places to eat, with odd opening hours

Visitors are accommodated by the Obsidian Group Accommodation and Tourist Services, +247 6246, which maintains a hotel (the Obsidian), two hostels, and two cottages (7 night minimum). Hotel rates range from 45 for a single to 79 for a VIP double. Hostel and cottage rates range from 25-50 per night.

Saint Helena is obviously the only reasonable destination you can visit from Ascension Island. See Get in/By sea

There is limited mobile service on the island, but service may be spotty at best. [1] (Numbers starting with 0 or 5 have been reserved for future services).

The country code for Ascension is 247 and the population is too small to need area or trunk STD codes. The International Prefix is 00. Subscriber numbers are typically 4 digits long and start with a 2 for the US Base, 3 for Travellers Hill or Airhead, 4 for Two Boats and a 6 or 7 for Georgetown.

There is a Wi-Fi hotspot in Obsidian Hotel’s lobby and patio for 10/day. The Post Office in Georgetown offers a vast array of Philatelic items for sale from the three islands of St Helena, Ascension Island and Tristan da Cunha. Airmail is possible, thanks to the airfield.WikiPedia:Ascension Island

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Ascension – Wikitravel

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