Tag Archives: challenges

Liquidity Warnings Send Hornbeck Offshore Services, Inc.’s Stock Plunging – Motley Fool

Posted: February 17, 2017 at 1:40 am

What happened

Shares of Hornbeck Offshore Services (NYSE:HOS) sank deep into the red on Thursday morning, plunging more than 22% by 10:30 a.m. EST after reporting its fourth-quarter results.

Hornbeck reported a net loss for the fourth-quarter of $19.2 million, or $0.53 per share, which was $0.08 per share wider than last quarter and $0.05 per share worse than analysts expected. Driving the decline was continued weakness in the offshore oil and gas market, which put pressure on vessel utilization and dayrates. In addition, general and administrative costs rose during the quarter due to an increase in incentive compensation expenses.

Image source: Getty Images.

Even more concerning was the company’s outlook. Hornbeck noted that it currently has 44 of its 62 offshore supply vessels idled due to lack of work. However, it expects to idle an average of 46 vessels in future quarters because it doesn’t see any improvement in market activities. Those challenging market conditions led the company to issue a warning concerning its future liquidity needs. Hornbeck noted in its earnings release that while it expects to have the financial resources to operate through the end of next year,

The Company does not currently expect to have sufficient liquidity to repay its three tranches of funded unsecured debt outstanding that mature in fiscal years 2019, 2020 and 2021, respectively, as they come due, absent a refinancing or restructuring of such debt. Refinancing in the current climate is not likely to be achievable on terms that are in-line with the Company’s historic cost of debt capital. The Company remains fully cognizant of the challenges currently facing the offshore oil and gas industry and continues to review its capital structure and assess its strategic options.

On the one hand, the company does have time to address this issue. However, the problem is that more time might not be the solution because the outlook for the industry remains bleak as there is a real risk that conditions could continue growing worse. For example,Diamond Offshore Drilling (NYSE:DO) recently warned that it has “yet to see a floor in the declining demand of deepwater assets.” Because of this, Diamond Offshore Drilling doesn’t see a recovery in the offshore drilling market occurring until 2019 or 2020. While others are optimistic that a recovery could start to take shape as early as next year, there’s a real possibility that Hornbeck’s financial stress could deepen if conditions worsen.

Oil prices have improved and stabilized above $50 a barrel, butthat’s still not enough to ignite a recovery in the offshore drilling sector. Most offshore service companies believe crude needs to improve to more than $60 per barrel before producers start expanding their drilling budgets, which might not arrive for quite some time. Given that outlook, and Hornbeck’s potential liquidity problems, this is a stock that investors are better off avoiding for the time being.

Matt DiLallo has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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Another Viewpoint: The Kelly twins offer a vital sign for space travel … – Gainesville Sun

Posted: February 12, 2017 at 7:32 am

When astronaut Scott Kelly returned to Earth after nearly a year on the International Space Station, he was 2 inches taller than his twin brother, astronaut Mark Kelly. When Scott left for the mission, he and his earthbound brother were the same height.

What happened? Scientists at NASA are poring over the data compiled from the Twins Study, information that benchmarks Scott and Mark Kelly’s genomic and physical markers before and after Scott’s yearlong mission on the space station.

So far we’ve learned that being in space for prolonged periods does have an effect on the chromosomes, bone structure and even the content of the culture in an astronaut’s gut. Scott’s DNA and RNA underwent hundreds of mutations in space that gradually returned to normal once he was back on Earth.

Scott Kelly exhibited declining bone density, but a healing hormone kicked in during his exercise regimen on the space station. Still, his cognitive abilities and muscle dexterity showed signs of having slowed a bit once he returned to Earth.

That will be a factor to consider when astronauts land on Mars after six months traveling through space. Setting up their living environment on the planet will present both physical and mental challenges.

NASA’s plans for manned missions to Mars in the 2030s are still in the early stages. The rival civilian space programs that have popped up are shooting for a Mars mission in the early-to-mid-2020s. Whoever gets to Mars first will be better prepared for the challenges of space travel thanks to the Twins Study.

The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

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Substantial investment in agriculture needed to ensure enough food for all – Daily Nation

Posted: February 11, 2017 at 8:22 am

= Despite many strategies, it has been difficult to achieve many development goals in agriculture. 2daysago

The country is in the throes of a ravaging drought with an estimated 2.7 million people facing acute food shortage.

Yet the country has settled into the frenzy of electioneering underlining the insensitivity of the political leadership. But this precisely underscores why we regard enough food and agriculture as a key agenda item in this election.

For many households, enough food is neither available nor affordable. However, this lack of enough food is not new. Since independence the government has declared its desire to have all Kenyans enjoy, at all times, safe food in sufficient quantity and quality to satisfy their nutritional needs that meets their cultural preferences, throughout their life-cycle.

Kenya Vision 2030 aspires to set the country on a prosperity path to be a globally competitive newly-industrialising, middle-income prosperous nation with a high quality life for all citizens by the year 2030, The Kenya Vision is being implemented through medium term plans.

The second medium plan identifies a number flagship projects for the agricultural sector including (i) policy, legal and regulatory reforms; (ii) Asal development in the Tana and Athi river basins; (iii) fertiliser cost-reduction; (iv) establishment of disease-free zones; (v) development of geo-spatial land use master plan; (vi) development of fisheries (blue economy).

Despite many strategies and efforts, many regrettably half-hearted, by the past and current government, it has been difficult to achieve many measurable aspirational development goals in the agricultural sector.

It is worth noting that agricultural systems in the country are characterised by eight agro-ecological zones suitable for different crops and livestock systems, based on altitude and rainfall patterns. Incidentally, human settlement has virtually followed the same geographical zonation.

Diverse agro-ecological potentials imply that different counties have varying economic opportunities in developing their crop and livestock sectors (and fish farming). Historically, counties with high or medium rainfall have received more public investments compared to those regions perceived to bear low potential such as the arid and semi-arid lands.

Public investments in agriculture have been considerably influenced by politics through policy making, public finance and donor funding.

As we enter another electioneering period, it can be safely said that there have been little efforts by our politicians to listen to voices of the farming community. During the election period, populist policies are promised to farmers in order to get their votes, and in many cases, little follow up is made to implement the promised projects.

For instance, in the last election cycle, Jubilee (and other opposing parties) made promises that cheap fertiliser would be made available to the poorest farmers, promises of reviving meat-processing facilities (such as Kenya Meat Commission, irrigation dams to be built and export markets to be sought. Often, many such promises are quickly forgotten once the elections are over, or are implemented in a half-hearted manner.

This cannot continue while the potential in agriculture to feed the nation, create gainful employment, revive our agro-based industries, and earn foreign exchange lies unexploited to the maximum possible limit? It is time to make some reality check on what agriculture can offer Kenyan citizens since the country aims to promote an innovative, commercially-oriented, and modern agricultural sector.

Irrigation reduces reliance on rainfed agriculture and that is reason several delegations have visited many countries, including Israel, to learn from what they do. However, the government has not done much on irrigation and neither have we benefited from the so-called benchmarking trips.

Four years ago, this government pledged to put one million acres under irrigation in five years. It identified 1.78 million acres in the Galana/Kulalu ranch (Kilifi and Tana River counties) for irrigation. A feasibility study was undertaken at a cost of Sh 1.2 billion.

The study recommended 10 investment plans, including beef and game ranching (49,085 acres), horticulture (42,817 acres), orchards (74,646 acres), sugarcane (177,136 acres), maize (93,540 acres), fish (9,577 acres), dairy (4,703 acres), bee keeping (4,611 acres) and agro-processing (5,334 acres).

It was expected that a total of about 25 million bags of maize were to be annually produced from Galana and thus bring the country back to the state of annul national food sufficiency with a surplus. So far, only 2,500 acres have been put under irrigation and produced 60,000 bags of maize.

It is disappointing. Perhaps it is time to look for any strategic lessons of the abandoned Bura irrigation scheme.

Maize consumption per person is estimated at 1.5 bags per year. Based on an estimated adult population of about 35 million, the countrys annual maize consumption stands at more than 50 million bags. Beans production stands at 6.8 million bags while consumption is an estimate 6.5 million bags, wheat production is 3 million bags, rice production is estimated at 113,000 tonnes while consumption is at 564,000 tonnes.

When shall Kenya have enough food? Any war is waged and won based on a definitive strategy.

One, there must be a deliberate political and policy shift to other ways and means of ensuring that enough food is available, accessible and affordable. Second, it is perhaps time to look for alternative ways to approach irrigation.

INVESTMENTS IN SMALL DAMS

It may involve investments in small dams using supplementary irrigation systems to reduce energy running costs.

Third, community ownership in irrigation and water management will be crucial and this brings into focus the role of county governments in driving agriculture as a devolved function.

Fourth, making water and improved sanitation easily accessible implies that girls would spend more time in school, and women would spend more time in productive activities, thus improving the general well-being of households. The UNDP estimates that for every Sh100 investment in water and sanitation leads to a Sh800 return in economic productivity.

Finally, while it is important that the country moves from dependency on rain-fed agriculture and maize, our national focus on food will require deliberate and sustained investments in better information services, use of modern agro-technologies to increase production, preservation and better use of food, investment in high-value traditional and non-traditional foodstuffs (agribusiness). Without value addition, agriculture, livestock and fisheries will be of little value to counties.

The government embarked on three-tiered fertiliser cost-reduction programme involving supply chain improvement in the market, blending of fertilisers and local manufacturing of fertiliser.

The policy objective was to reduce the cost of food production to enable the county have enough food. The average price of a 50-kg subsidised bag of top-dressing fertiliser was Sh 2,000 while market price was Sh4,500.

The fertiliser cost-reduction programme required multiple initiatives including (i) capacity building of farmers, farmers co-operatives / associations; (ii) estimating annual fertiliser demand, (iii) efficient fertiliser procurement and distribution systems, (iv) provision of warehousing (NCPB stores, large co-operative societies, etc.); and (v) addressing infrastructure challenges.

A fertiliser manufacturing factory has been completed (August 2016) at a cost of Sh120 billion in Eldoret although it is yet to be commissioned.

Kenyans will be waiting to see how the facility will contribute towards the reduction in the cost of fertiliser in the foreseeable future due to a number of potential bottlenecks.

First, Kenya is not endowed with substantial quantities of raw materials for manufacturing fertiliser except filler material such as limestone.

Second, the domestic market for fertiliser is too small for any viable fertiliser plant.

Third, key industry experts have never interrogated the contents of both the feasibility study and the independent appraisal to understand the parameters used for establishment of the plant in Eldoret.

Fourth, according to the presentation made to the Parliamentary Committee on Agriculture, the Eldoret plant is not a fertiliser manufacturing factory but a blending plant where the same fertilisers are imported and blended. There are several types and many types of fertilisers used in Kenya.

Land is perhaps one of the most contentious political, economic and social problems in the country and is at the core of most of the resource-based socio-economic challenges Kenya faces, the most profound being the 2007-2008 post-election violence. It touches the very fabric of national cohesion.

There have been many past attempts to harmonise and consolidate the legal framework touching on land and its administration in order to guide equitable and efficient utilization of land for different purposes (agriculture, industry, human settlement, wildlife and forestry).

There have been calls for a national land information management system, legislation of minimum acreage per person to reduce speculation, automation (digitisation) of land registries, development of a national geo-spatial land use master plan, amongst other measures, to safeguard individual and community claims to land.

Indeed, in some areas where land is not titled, this government pledged to issue six million title deeds. Although there was a recent setback, a number of titles have been issued although proper procedures were not fully followed, as was ruled by the High Court in January 2017.

Greater effort must be made to address the land question for various reasons, including providing incentives for greater use of agricultural land. Secure land ownership is the bedrock of all investments.

It is clear therefore that a significant investment in agriculture is key to resolving our challenges in food self-sufficiency, employment, economic development of the Asals and, the conundrum around land ownership and land management issues.

management issues. Blithe promises are inevitable during campaigns but Kenyans must be empowered to query political parties, and later governments, on such promises.

Traditionally, the main factors of production are land, labour and capital (including knowledge, credit). Taking energy as a proxy for labour, we have to use people, livestock and machines to increase the amount of energy for driving agriculture for production, processing, transportation and preservation.

In the early years, the country relied on human labour and animals in agriculture. However, the country must embrace mechanisation to reduce drudgery and offer the youth a viable motivation to engage in farming as a more dignified and dependable occupation.

Mechanisation promotes social recognition as it significantly reduces the hardship of employing farm labour. Hard work is regarded as a poor persons job or an occupation for people with little brains.

It will require specific and deliberate strategies to make appropriate mechanisation services (like hiring tractors) a profitable and sustainable investment for different agricultural processes. We can do it and those seeking leadership must demonstrate beyond the rhetoric that they understand this and have concrete plans to implement them.

The pastoral communities are amongst the hardest hit when we experience droughts and they are often the ones at whom empty promises are directed during elections.

The various challenges posed by drought as epitomized by periodic conflicts over pasture and water must be addressed in a holistic manner.

Kenya is a water scarce country and must improve water security, management of water catchments and wetlands, enhance water resources monitoring as well as increase investments in water infrastructure development.

Development of boreholes must take cognisance of underground water resources to guard against overexploitation as water will become salty and unusable. We, nonetheless, must end drought emergencies.

Kenyas livestock and livestock products are not perceived to meet international zoo-sanitary ( hygiene and safety) standards.

MEET MARKET ACCESS CONDITIONS

In order to meet international market access conditions, the government pledged to create six disease-free zones and three export abattoirs in the coastal zone (Kwale, Kilifi and Taita Taveta); Laikipia, Isiolo and Samburu zone; Makueni and Kitui zone; Tana River zone; Central Kenya zone and South Rift zone.

So far, a feasibility study and bill of quantities had been done for only the Bachuma disease free facility on a 15,000 acre land (Taita-Taveta County). The government will spend Sh2.6 billion. When completed, the Bachuma Disease Free facility will have a holding capacity of 24,000 cattle, 297,000 sheep and goats and 18,000 camels.

While commendable, it is time to revisit the issue of disease free-zone as a strategic investment considering the importance of the pastoralist economy and the perennial electioneering promises that have been pledged time and again. Perhaps, except for the Middle East, Kenya must focus on improving livestock production to meet domestic and regional demand.

Many farmers lose most of their produce, especially perishable commodities (like vegetables, milk, fish and tea). Post-harvest losses are estimated at between 30 and 75 per cent depending on the commodity.

These losses are mostly because of poor transport networks, low value addition, lack of storage and preservation facilities. This calls for effective strategies to invest in post-harvest management; cold storage facilities, value-addition and warehousing.

There are many investment opportunities (by both local and foreign entities) in many agricultural value chains (input supply, production, agro-processing and marketing) if marketing infrastructure is developed and expanded.

Can we address the land question?

Land is perhaps one of the most contentious political, economic and social problems in the country and is at the core of most of the resource-based socio-economic challenges Kenya faces, the most profound being the 2007-2008 post-election violence.

It touches the very fabric of national cohesion. There have been many past attempts to harmonise and consolidate the legal framework touching on land and its administration in order to guide equitable and efficient utilization of land for different purposes (agriculture, industry, human settlement, wildlife and forestry).

There have been calls for a national land information management system, legislation of minimum acreage per person to reduce speculation, automation (digitization) of land registries, development of a national geo-spatial land use master plan, amongst other measures, to safeguard individual and community claims to land.

Indeed, in some areas where land is not titled, this government pledged to issue six million title deeds. Although there was a recent setback, a number of titles have been issued although proper procedures were not fully followed, as was ruled by the High Court in January 2017.

Greater effort must be made to address the land question for various reasons, including providing incentives for greater use of agricultural land. Secure land ownership is the bedrock of all investments.

It is clear therefore that a significant, strategically consistent investment in agriculture is fundamental to resolving, in a sustainable manner, our challenges in food self-sufficiency, employment, economic development of the ASALs and, the conundrum around land ownership and land management issues.

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Another View: NASA’s Twins Study offers vital sign for space travel – Press Herald

Posted: February 9, 2017 at 6:31 am

When astronaut Scott Kelly returned to Earth after nearly a year on the International Space Station, he was 2 inches taller than his twin brother, astronaut Mark Kelly. When Scott left for the mission, he and his earthbound brother were the same height.

What happened? Scientists at NASA are poring over the data compiled from the Twins Study, information that benchmarks Scott and Mark Kellys genomic and physical markers before and after Scotts yearlong mission on the space station.

So far weve learned that being in space for prolonged periods does have an effect on the chromosomes, bone structure and even the content of the culture in an astronauts gut. Scotts DNA and RNA underwent hundreds of mutations in space that gradually returned to normal once he was back on Earth.

Scott Kelly exhibited declining bone density, but a healing hormone kicked in during his exercise regimen on the space station. Still, his cognitive abilities and muscle dexterity showed signs of having slowed a bit once he returned to Earth.

That will be a factor to consider when astronauts land on Mars after six months traveling through space. Setting up their living environment on the planet will present both physical and mental challenges.

NASAs plans for manned missions to Mars in the 2030s are still in the early stages. The rival civilian space programs that have popped up are shooting for a Mars mission in the early-to-mid-2020s. Whoever gets to Mars first will be better prepared for the challenges of space travel thanks to the Twins Study.

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To a Collegian columnist: Disregarding political correctness hinders social justice causes – Kenyon Collegian

Posted: at 6:17 am

Dear Griffin,I am glad that you took the time to learn about feminism and use your privilege to promote its ideas. I also think its good for people in positions of power to ask marginalized groups about the challenges they face in order to form a more empathetic worldview. However, your op-ed sees political correctness as an obstruction to education as though by being politically correct, we cannot understand people who are different from us. I believe your view on this matter is inconsiderate at best and destructive at worst.

Political correctness is not a means of degrading people of your social status. It is a basic component of the respectful discourse you appear to advocate. It also has nothing to do with you being called out for mansplaining. Having seen some of your Facebook posts, I believe that you were actually being a helpful ally in the way you approached the prompt why we need feminism. However, your response to women being upset should not have been to quit publicly advocating for womens rights. It should have been to continue a conversation with them about why they, the people whose rights you claim to value, feel patronized. Maybe you would have learned something from them, or maybe they would have seen that you are helping their cause.

Ignoring political correctness is dangerous. It means ignoring the history that contributes to oppression today. For years, marginalized groups have been forced to conform to the language and etiquette that make those in power comfortable. Black Americans were told to address white people using Yes maam/sir for years while they were not treated with the same dignity. Just because your safety doesnt depend on using culturally correct language, it doesnt make it any less important that you use the right terms for others.Richard Wright, who was once beaten for forgetting to address a white man as sir, said, I had to keep remembering what others took for granted; I had to think out what others felt. You may believe that you are doing your best to think out what others feel, but you have misidentified what the real implications of your words are. Your friend was appalled by your comment about they/them/their pronouns because it wasnt a respectful inquiry into genderqueer identity, but rather a thoughtless comment that does not consider the challenges faced by the trans community. Sure its grammatically incorrect to use plural words to refer to one individual, but that linguistic issue pales in comparison to the fight for recognition that trans people face.

A better way to voice your discomfort around pronouns would be to ask, Why do certain people use they/them/their when its not proper grammar? or to look it up on the thousands of great websites specifically created to educate the public. Otherwise, you risk being one of countless examples of cis, white, straight, upperclass men valuing their comfort over a marginalized persons struggle for equality.

I understand that your feelings were hurt, and yes, it is important to treat one another with kindness and respect. Attacking people for lacking knowledge about an issue is not only ineffective, but disrespectful. However, disregarding political correctness does nothing to advance social justice conversations. It actually damages them. This isnt part of some mass liberal agenda. Its part of human rights, specifically the right to live outside the shadow of oppression.

I dont believe your identity devalues your thoughts about gender or any other matter, as that would run counter to the ideals of equality and free speech. However, it should give you reason to think about how your ideas will be received, in contrast to those held by marginalized people. You say youve left a conversation about gender feeling scorned and uneducated, but youve probably never left one feeling unloved by your family, as so many trans people have.

Youre right we should talk about what makes us different. These are tough conversations and feelings will get hurt, but maybe you can put aside your guilt long enough to realize that, when it comes to advancing social justice, we need to be listening to the grievances of oppressed peoples first and our own discomfort second.

I think we owe our fellow humans that much.

Sincerely,

Vahni KurraA fellow human

Vahni Kurra 20 is undeclared from Columbus, Ohio. Contact her at kurra1@kenyon.edu.

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Non-Medical Medical Decisions | Commentary by Dr. Gene Dorio – SCVNEWS.com

Posted: at 5:45 am

A pediatrician decides a struggling teen with mental illness needs hospitalization to neutralize psychologic demons impacting their personal and social life.

A workers compensation doctor requests a neck MRI in a powerline worker with growing right arm numbness and weakness to search for potential paralyzing nerve impingement.

An orthopedist orders special testing to determine if an elder patient with right hip pain which limits walking and driving might need surgery to improve her quality of life.

Physicians are rigorously trained to make decisions in the best interest of their patients. Even after medical school and residency, doctors must follow the challenges of evidence-based medicine, standard of care, peer review, and muster the time for continuing medical education and certification.

Doctors are not only held accountable by their peers, but also legally, as they could be subject to lawsuits. Additionally, state licensing agencies that oversee medical professionals can discipline them, should they not practice medicine up to the standards of quality medical decision-making.

However, what if the teens pediatrician feels hospitalization is acutely needed for mental illness, but it is denied by the insurance company? What if the workers comp physician orders an MRI for the powerline workers ailing right arm, but it is denied? Or, if special testing to evaluate grandmas worsening mobility and pain is turned down by the HMO? Who is held accountable?

To justify requests for specific patient care, physicians are forced to have peer-to-peer phone discussions with doctors employed by insurance companies, workers comp and HMOs. Frequently, these conversations result in denial of further care without medical justification.

A controversial question arises: Are denials by these company doctors considered medical decisions?

They are not. These decisions are considered utilization review. What does this mean? They are making decisions based on controlling costs, which is in the financial interest of the for-profit agencies they serve but not necessarily in the best interest of the patient.

Even though they are licensed doctors practicing medicine, their role in patient care is under the guise of utilization review and therefore not under the scrutiny of state licensing agencies.

What if these physicians deny care because they are incentivized to enhance personal bonuses? More so, what if some are making decisions outside the realm of their medical expertise (e.g., a urologist deciding about a diabetic)? Who holds these physicians accountable for moral transgressions or lack of judgement?

In California, we have a Medical Board that oversees licensing for all state physicians. If you report a licensed physician for making substandard medical decisions, an investigation ensues. If, though, the doctor is employed by an insurance company, workers comp or HMO and makes denial decisions on their behalf, it is considered utilization review, and they are not held accountable.

I do not pretend to understand every law and rule governing the Medical Board. But these companies have created legal barriers protecting doctors who might make substandard medical decisions.

Many physicians continue to fight for patient care rights despite frustration and helplessness of ongoing phone calls and paperwork they face. Yet substandard medical care will hamper their efforts as laws are manipulated and oversight is negligible.

Making medical decisions has never been easy. Assuring accountability makes it even harder.

Gene Uzawa Dorio, M.D., is a housecall geriatric physician and member of thePhysicians Organizing Committee atHenry Mayo Newhall Hospital. The views expressed in this column as his alone.

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Decentral Talk Live Ep #67: Brennen Byrne of Clef – Video

Posted: April 11, 2015 at 7:47 am



Decentral Talk Live Ep #67: Brennen Byrne of Clef
Interview with Brennen Byrne of Clef on the technology behind Clef's two-factor authentication, the role of conferences in the Bitcoin community, and the challenges in making Bitcoin easy to…

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[Audiobook] What’s the Big Deal about Bitcoin? | Steve Patterson – Video

Posted: March 31, 2015 at 10:47 pm



[Audiobook] What's the Big Deal about Bitcoin? | Steve Patterson
Get it in paperback: http://goo.gl/24rcjc Part I: Bitcoin Clearly Explained | 01:16 Part II: So What's the Big Deal? | 31:01 Part III: Common Objections, Real Challenges | 1:04:40 Check…

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Brian Fabian Crain from Epicenter Bitcoin – 2015 Inside Bitcoins Berlin – Interview by AnnaKNonE – Video

Posted: March 15, 2015 at 5:48 pm



Brian Fabian Crain from Epicenter Bitcoin – 2015 Inside Bitcoins Berlin – Interview by AnnaKNonE
Brian from Epicenter Bitcoin interviewed by Anna at the 2015 Inside Bitcoins Berlin about the change within the community and the challenges of content creators. Listen to the podcast at epicenter…

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NATO’s Achievements and Challenges in 2014 – Video

Posted: February 1, 2015 at 6:54 pm



NATO's Achievements and Challenges in 2014
NATO was busy in 2014. It saw the end of our longest mission to date, with transition to Resolute Support in Afghanistan. It also saw major changes to the se…

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