Tag Archives: clients

Offshore Company Formation, Incorporation & Bank Accounts

Posted: August 25, 2016 at 4:34 pm

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Offshore Company Formation, Incorporation & Bank Accounts

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circular economy news, closed loop, resource efficiency

Posted: August 2, 2016 at 4:36 pm

How to make coconut chia pudding

This crazy Singapore school looks like it’s made from rainbow lollipops

A new LEED pilot credit for Water Restoration Certificates

Parksmart enables our clients to meet their sustainability goals

Green Sports Alliance leads GADOS volunteers at Houstons Yes Prep Northside

CDC issues historic Zika virus warning for northern Miami

AutoNaut secures investment from Seike Group to advance R&D

Basurama transforms landfill trash into playgrounds in Taipei

Sydney artist upcycles wooden blinds into beautiful pendant lamps

A rural Montana farm is turned into an artistic dream destination called Tippet Rise

BMW to rival the Tesla Model 3 with an all-electric 3 Series

Hyperloop One opens the world’s first Hyperloop factory

New protective timber slats shield the renovated Escu House from Sydney’s sun

New chemical-free desalination tech helps bring water surplus to Israel

Mother trees recognize kin and send them “messages of wisdom”

Experts to Rio Olympic athletes: Don’t put your head underwater

Take a spin inside this psychedelic ball made of hammers at Porto’s midsummer festival

San Diego’s first off-grid Passive House has its very own wind turbine

Herzog & De Meuron’s stunning Elbphilharmonie to finally open in January

PSU students design Pickathon concert stage out of wooden 2×4’s

Plan Review Services

World’s most efficient electric car gets an outrageous 26,135 MPGe

UWE to install largest single roof-mounted solar panel array in UK University sector

Beautiful brick ambulance station in the UK renovated as a cozy vacation home

Tesla is building an electric minibus based on the Model X

This cool Tournesol swimming pool opens up like a futuristic flower

Read the rest here:

circular economy news, closed loop, resource efficiency

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Find a TMS Doctor or Therapist – The TMS Wiki

Posted: July 31, 2016 at 5:51 am

The following pages might help you choose the person best suited for you:

We hope that you find the following pages helpful as well:

You may see the following links under the entries for some providers:

Before starting a professional relationship with anyone on this list, you should confirm relevant information, including credentials and accepted insurance. As with all other information on the wiki, we can’t guarantee the information in this list. When possible, we try to include links to make it easy for you to confirm the information.

Please help us improve this list by providing us with more information about yourself. See our “Updating information about yourself in our practitioner list” page for information about how to do this. General information about interacting with the wiki can be found in our “For TMS practitioners” page.

If you are a licensed TMS therapist or physician and would like to be listed on our directory please Contact Us.

Unfortunately, many people who think they may have Tension Myositis Syndrome (TMS) do not live in an area served by any TMS professionals. Luckily, some TMS professionals are able to provide services over the internet or telephone. Although diagnosis can’t be performed over the internet or telephone and distance can provide a significant barrier to psychotherapy, the following people provide coaching and other services to people who aren’t able to travel to meet a provider face to face. More information can be found in our page on Structured TMS recovery programs.

Currently, all additional practitioners listed are able to conduct sessions remotely. Click here to go to the Additional TMS Practitioners page.

Dr Rochelle is a practicing orthopedic surgeon in Arkansas. He incorporates the TMS diagnosis and treatments in his practice. He says that only when people “accept the idea that unpleasant emotions in the unconscious mind actually cause physical symptoms will we see an end to the current epidemic of TMS musculoskeletal pain in its many varieties.” He is also a contributing author to Dr Sarno’s The Divided Mind. (Source)

Address has not been verified Orthopedic Surgery 403 Morrow St N Suite F Mena, AR 71953 Main Wiki Page on Dr. James Rochelle Contributed the article, “My Perspective on Psychosomatic Medicine,” in The Divided Mind, by Dr. John Sarno. 2006.

Will Baum is a psychotherapist in the Los Angeles area. He has written a number of articles for PsychologyToday.com, the Huffington Post, and Where the Client Is. He is cross trained in psychodynamic talk therapy, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). Will Baum’s practice is focused on anxiety/depression, relationships, chronic pain, and addiction recovery. He has experience working with an “extremely wide range of clients and concerns.” (Source)

Recent Change of Address 4448 Ambrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90027 (323) 610-0112 will@willbaum.com TMS Wiki Profile / Website Main Wiki Page about Will Baum Will Baum has written several TMS related articles for Where the Client Is. Information about them can be found on the TMS in the Media page.

Arnold Bloch, LCSW has been in practice for over 25 years, during which time he has seen over 200 clients with TMS. He holds a master’s degree in social work from the University of Southern California, and studied under long-time TMS therapist, Don Dubin, MFT. Bloch has a close working relationship with David Schechter, MD (Source) who himself has seen over 1000 patients with TMS. He has dedicated himself to “the alleviation of chronic pain, especially when that pain can not be satisfactorily explained by conventional medical examination.” He believes in the power people have in “freeing themselves from the suffering brought about by a negatively conditioned mind,” and he seeks to help people develop the skills to choose the mind and body states they desire to have.

Bloch has been very active in the TMS community. He has attended TMS conferences and stays up-to-date on the latest mind-body research and treatment techniques. In the fall of 2012, Bloch participated in a TMS webinar, alongside Dr. Schechter. (Source)

Available via Phone and Skype 1280 Willsbrook Ct Westlake Village, CA 91361 (805) 796-9540 arnold@arnoldbloch.com Survey Response / Website TMS Webinar with Dr. Schechter and Arnold Bloch

Samantha Bothast is a psychotherapist at the Pain Psychology Center in Los Angeles, CA headed by Alan Gordon, LCSW. Samantha uses both a cognitive behavioral and psychodynamic approach in her sessions. Samantha worked as a medical social worker for 19 years prior to working at the Pain Psychology Center. (Source)

Available via Skype 9777 Wilshire Blvd. Suite 1007 Beverly Hills, CA 90212 (310) 853-2049 Contact Form

(Deceased) Don Dubin was a committed and loved TMS therapist who worked with David Schechter for many years.

Alan Gordon is a psychotherapist in private practice in Santa Monica who specializes in the treatment of chronic pain using the the TMS approach. He is a co-founder and the Executive Director of the Pain Psychology Center, a TMS treatment center in Los Angeles. He is also a board member of the Psychophysiologic Disorders Association (PPDA). He was the primary organizer (chair) of the 2nd annual TMS Conference held in LA in March 2010, where he gave a presentation entitled Cognitive-Behavioral Approaches in the Treatment of Mind-Body Disorders. His efforts were a key factor in making the conference a success. Alan also co-organized and presented at the 2013 clinical training in Los Angeles with Howard Schubiner, MD in partnership with the PPDA.

Alan developed a free multimedia TMS Recovery Program, which he donated to the TMS Wiki in 2013. He has also written an article called Miracles of Mindbody Medicine for the Healthcare Counseling and Psychotherapy Journal.

Alan is also one of the answering therapists for the Ask a TMS Therapist program.

(Source1, Source2, Source3, Source4)

Available via Skype 1247 7th St., Suite 300 Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 945-6811 and 9777 Wilshire Blvd. #1007 Beverly Hills, CA 90212 (310) 945-6811 Contact Form Forum Profile / Personal Website / Pain Psychology Center Main Wiki Page About Alan Gordon Ask a TMS Therapist Responses

Karen Kay is a licensed clinical psychologist with psychoanalytic training, and has a private practice in West Los Angeles. She has worked with TMS patients throughout her 25+ year career, and has been supervised by Arlene Feinblatt, Ph.D. (the psychologist who developed the psychotherapeutic approach to TMS in collaboration with John Sarno, M.D.) as well as Eric Sherman, Psy.D., and Frances Sommer Anderson, Ph.D. She has been an approved supervisor by the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy since 1991. She says, “I have had great success in helping people who struggle with mind-body difficulties. In addition, I have specialty training in working with children, adults, and families.”

1800 Fairburn Avenue Suite 109 Los Angeles, CA 90025 (310) 446-0500 TMS Wiki Profile Survey Response Website

Suzi Kimbell is a psychotherapist with training in somatic, body-centered psychotherapy, EMDR, mindfulness-based stress reduction, and trauma and PTSD treatment from a mind-body perspective. She attended the clinical training in Los Angeles in November 2013. Suzi also suffered from chronic back pain, which she overcame using the TMS approach. She writes, “My own recovery from TMS led to my passion for helping those with chronic pain, whose symptoms are so often misunderstood by the traditional medical community. I know first hand how powerful Dr Sarnos ideas are and that recovery from pain is truly possible.” (Source)

Available via Phone and Skype 860 Via De La Paz, Suite F6 Pacific Palisades, CA 90272 (310) 463 7598 Insurance Accepted: All PPO insurances (Suzi Kimball is an out of network provider) Survey Response

Catherine Lockwood is an experienced Intensive Short Term Dynamic Psychotherapy (ISTDP) psychotherapist based in Los Angeles, California. She has studied under many notable ISTDP instructors and continues to attend workshops and seminars on ISTDP. She also attended the 2013 Clinical Training for the Treatment of Mind-Body Disorders in Los Angeles. There, she observed how Howard Schubiner, MD and Alan Gordon, LCSW, the presenters of the training, are utilizing ISTDP in their approaches to treating TMS. Catherine writes, “I am passionate and dedicated to continuing to improve my skills in ISTDP, TMS and trauma treatment.” (Source)

Available via Video 179 Barrington Place, Suite B Brentwood Village Los Angeles, CA 900049 (310) 488-5292 CatherineLockwoodMFT@GMail.com Survey Response / Website

Daniel G. Lyman is a psychotherapist at the Pain Psychology Center in Los Angeles, CA headed by Alan Gordon, LCSW. He earned a master’s degree in Social Work and in Public Administration from the University of Southern California and specializes in the treatment of mindbody pain syndromes. In describing his treatment approach, he writes, My goal in therapy is to provide a safe place to challenge our current beliefs and behaviors regarding our pain (TMS). The process is two-fold: The first part is changing the nature of our relationship to our symptoms, and the second part is discovering why the symptoms are there in the first place. These concurrent paths help to decrease the symptoms in the present as well as discourage the symptoms from recurring in the future. Daniel also specializes in working with the LGBT population, including couples and family issues. (Source)

Daniel is one of the participating psychotherapists in the Ask A TMS Therapist program. Read his responses here.

Contributed article: 10 Days of Silence: Meditation, Pain, & How You Can Become the Most Emotionally Healthy Person You Know, by Daniel G. Lyman (Part I), (Part II).

Available via Phone and Video (617) 470-6043 DanielGLyman@gmail.com Survey Response / Forum Profile Ask A TMS Therapist Responses

Gillian Marcus is a clinical therapist with a private practice in West Los Angeles specialized in TMS. She attended the Los Angeles conference When Stress Causes Pain for TMS practitioners in November 2013. Gillian also has a personal history of TMS, and used a combination techniques including psycho-education, therapy, meditation and other self-help techniques to help relieve her TMS symptoms. (Source)

Available via Phone 2001 South Barrington Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90025 (310) 288-3536 Survey Response

Brooke Mathews is an experienced psychodynamic therapist based in Southern California. A former board member of the Psychophysiologic Disorders Association (PPDA), Brooke earned her master’s degree in social work from the University of Southern California, and is a licensed clinical social worker (LCSW) in the state of California. She writes, I have devoted a great deal of my practice to working with and advocating for patients who can’t seem to find anything medically or physically wrong…My approach is to treat the whole person, whether you come in with pain and are subsequently depressed, or your pain is a result of your anxiety, I work with patients to address the source of the problem and resolve the issues with pain. Brooke also has a personal connection to TMS, suffering fro chronic migraines in the past. (Source)

Available via Phone and Skype Recent Change of Address 3331 Ocean Park #101 Santa Monica, CA 90405 (917) 692-4085 bmathewslcsw@gmail.com Survey Response

Andrew Miller is a licensed Marriage Family Therapist (LMFT) and a TMS/PPD sufferer. He has over a decade of experience with TMS as both a patient and as a clinician. As a clinician, he received his Masters of Arts in Clinical Psychology at Antioch University in Los Angeles. Incorporating psychodynamic, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), mindfulness and psychodramatic techniques, he has helped his clients reduce TMS/PPD symptoms, more masterfully deal with difficult emotions, and more skillfully cope with lifes adversity. Currently, Andrew works in private practice and runs groups at treatment centers across Los Angeles.

Available via Phone and Skype Recent Change in Address 566 S. San Vicente Blvd. Suite 203 Los Angeles CA 90048 and 1314 Westwood Blvd. Suite 201 Los Angeles, CA 90024 (310) 776-5102 Website Survey Response Forum Profile / Introductory Thread / Success Story

Jessica Oifer is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist based in Los Angeles, California. She has worked with David Schechter, MD and in 2013 she attended the Clinical Training for the treatment of mind-body disorders in Los Angeles, CA. Jessica is also trained in the Trauma Resiliency Model, an approach that helps restores balance to the body after traumatic stress. On her general treatment approach, Jessica writes, My process often includes non-judgmental exploration of my clients past and present experiences, as well as the development of concrete skills to reduce the physical and emotional symptoms that traumatic stress can have on the body and nervous system. (Source)

Available via Phone and Skype 4640 Admiralty Way Suite 318 Marina del Ray, CA 90292 and 15300 Ventura Boulevard Suite 328 Sherman Oaks, CA 91403 (818) 538-9548 jessicaoifermft@gmail.com Survey Response / Website

Colleen Perry is a licensed marriage and family therapist practicing in the Los Angeles area. She focuses on eating disorders and body image issues, along with helping people with chronic pain. She says “In individual therapy we explore the direct link of the unconscious mind to the manifestation of pain in the body. Traditional forms of pain treatment such as physical therapy, pain medications, anti-inflammatory medications and injections, surgery, acupuncture, chiropractic care, or massage, do not address the underlying emotional issues that are causing the pain in the first place. All that these other forms of pain management can give you are temporary relief…The most immediate relief for clients upon receiving the TMS diagnosis is that there is nothing structurally wrong with their body and are therefore encouraged to go about their daily activities of life without giving into the pain.”

Available via Video 1247 Seventh St. Suite 300 Santa Monica 90401 (310) 259-8970 drselfish@yahoo.com Website TMS Wiki Profile Main Wiki Page on Colleen Perry Curriculum Vitae

Dr. Pohl is a clinical health psychologist with both master and doctorate level education in health psychology and additional training in pain, chronic illness, and other health-related issues (source). Dr. Pohl also has developed a specialty in trauma and health psychology (source). She writes, “It takes a great deal of courage to ask for help. It requires facing ones problems head on and it can stir up feelings of shame and vulnerability. You may experience difficulty with trusting someone to accompany you on this journey; but also trusting that positive change is possible. It is important to find someone you can connect with to start your healing and growth. In my work with clients, I strive to create a safe and compassionate environment” (source).

2730 Wilshire Blvd, Suite 600 Santa Monica, CA 90403 (310) 709-4582 Insurance Accepted: All PPO insurances (Dr. Pohl is an out of network provider) Survey Response / Website

Arlen is a licensed psychologist in California. He has a doctorate in psychology. He says “I had been focusing on the mind body connection for a long time before I got exposed to Dr. Sarno. His thinking filled in important gaps for me. I have now spent several years specifically extending his diagnostic formulations into effective treatment for those people whose pain is caused by or worsened by emotions that have gotten directed into physical pain. I consider physical therapy, anti-inflammatory or pain deadening drugs and surgery to all have potential value. However, If you are not satisfied with the limitations of those approaches and believe that your pain has a significant emotional component, I can work with you on healing it.” (Source)

1923 1/2 Westwood Blvd, Suite 2 Los Angeles, CA 90025 and 20501 Ventura Blvd, Suite 395 Woodland Hills, CA 91364 Website (818) 999-0581 Arlen@ArlenRing.com

David Schechter is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Family Medicine of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. Dr. Schechter has over twenty five years of experience with the Tension Myositis Syndrome (TMS) diagnosis, has treated over a thousand patients has published original research on the subject and is the author of The Mindbody Workbook. While a medical student at NYU, he was a successful patient of Dr. Sarno. Dr. Schechter was a speaker at the 2nd Annual TMS Conference in March 2010. His presentation was entitled “Clinical Evaluation of Patients with Mind-Body Disorders.” (Source)

Available via Internet Video 8500 Wilshire Blvd, Suite 705 Beverly Hills, CA 90211 (310) 657-1022 310-six nine four-9814 fax and 10811 Washington Blvd, Suite 250 Culver City, CA 90232 310-836-2225 (310-836-BACK) 310-six nine four-9814 fax frontofficedrs@gmail.com TMS Wiki Profile / Survey Response / Q&A Answers / Workbook and CDs / Website Main Wiki Page About David Schechter / Board member of the Psychophysiologic Disorders Association (PPDA) / Curriculum Vitae Insurance Accepted: PPO provider for Blue Cross, Shield, United, Aetna, Cigna, Medicare. No HMO’s.

Clive Segil is an internationally renowned orthopedic surgeon from Los Angeles with 30 years of experience in the management of musculoskeletal disorders a healer not just a physician/surgeon, with creative approaches to patient problems. Dr. Segil sees the patient as a whole person not only a disease, and he places great emphasis on the mind-body connection, applying the concept of what is best for the patient. This means that he uses treatments that result in a cure, at best, and at very least, a marked improvement in their well-being. (Source)

2080 Century Park East, Suite 500 Los Angeles, CA 90067 (310) 203-5490 (310) 203-5412 fax drsegil@drsegil.com Website CURRICULUM VITAE Survey Response Insurance Accepted: All

Dr. Smith wrote one of the few doctoral dissertations on mind-body medicine (Claremont Graduate University 1998). He gives lectures and seminars on Tension Myositis Syndrome (TMS), as well as contributing to research on the subject. (Source)

The Noetic Health Institute Irvine, CA (949) 460-0820 drsmith@noetichealth.com Website Resume

Jill is a licensed marriage and family therapist in the Los Angeles area. She says “My interest in TMS grew after my own experiences with chronic pain for many years and my frustration with the traditional medical community. I knew there were many people suffering from ‘mystery illnesses’ that needed relief, guidance and support. I read Dr. John Sarno’s book and was introduced to TMS through Dr. David Schechter in Los Angeles and Don Dubin MFCC. I am in private practice in the West Hollywood area, and chronic pain and somatization is one area of interest of mine. Unconscious ‘bad’ feelings that have been suppressed since childhood such as anger, guilt, sadness, rage, disappointment, unloveability and low self-esteem often emerge as somatic symptoms in various parts of the body.” (Source)

Available via Phone 8240 Beverly Blvd Suite #8 Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 692-3759 jdspsyche@aol.com TMS Wiki Profile / Survey Response / Website Insurance Accepted: Private Pay

Clark has a masters in Humanistic Psychology (Mind/Body focus) and a PhD in Clinical Psychology, California Institute of Integral Studies. He is a licensed psychologist in California. He receives most of his referrals from Dr. Parvez Fatteh in the San Francisco Bay Area, who is a Sarno adherent and is board certified in physical medicine & rehabilitation, with a sub-specialty (Board Certified) in pain medicine.

He says, “About 8 years ago I was working with a client who had a number of issues, with the most compelling one severe tendon/muscle pain in his arms. He was diagnosed with repetitive motion injury and was so incapacitated that he couldn’t even pick up his two year old daughter. This client introduced me to Sarno’s work as he worked through his pain. The philosophy of Sarno’s beliefs were familiar to me because of my background in mind/body psychologies in my Master’s program at Sonoma State University. Approximately 7 years ago I had a close family member go through excruciating back pain. She consulted with over 10 health practitioners (mainstream and alternative) and did not find any diminution of the pain until she read “The Mind Body Prescription”. She was pain free in about 2 months.” (Source)

Available via Phone 1902 Webster St San Francisco, CA 94115 (415) 923-6760 clarkgrove@sbcglobal.net Survey Response / TMS Wiki Profile / Website Insurance Accepted: Aetna, Managed Health Network.

Katy Wray graduated from the California Institute of Integral Studies in 1989, and has been in practice for over 20 years. She specializes in relationship issues, anxiety, chronic pain, and depression. She describes her therapeutic style as “interactive and collaborative.” She says, “We will work together on coming to a deeper understanding of what is happening in your life. Different possibilities and choices can then become available to you.” (Source)

2506 Clay Street San Francisco, CA 94115 (415) 922-8121 kwraymft@yahoo.com

Santa Cruz area

Dr Eisendorf MD is a doctor with the Palo Alto Medical Foundation in California. He says: I try to understand my patients. I want to know what their experiences have been, what their joys and challenges are, and what’s getting in the way of their more full enjoyment of life. My studies with Dr. John Sarno, author of “Healing Back Pain”, “The Mindbody Prescription”, and other books, has strongly influenced my practice of medicine. The mind and emotions have a profound effect on our physical and mental health and well-being. To better understand this relationship and help patients use the mind to their advantage, I teach classes and offer monthly support groups. (Source)

2025 Soquel Avenue Santa Cruz, CA 95062 (831) 458-5524 Website Insurance Accepted: Cigna, Healthnet, Wellcare, Humana, BCBS, United Health Care, Wellpoint

Hasanna received a M.A. in Clinical Psychology in 1992 from JFK University and has been a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist since 1995. She says “For the past fourteen years I’ve been helping people with a wide range of issues, such as relationship problems of all kinds, depression, grief and loss, anxiety, life transitions, spirituality, parenting, self esteem, and chronic physical pain. I cured my own long-standing back, neck and hip pain 10 years ago after reading Sarno’s Healing Back Pain. Unfortunately, I didn’t discover TMS in time to avoid two unnecessary shoulder surgeries in both shoulders. It has been so satisfying to help my clients avoid a similar mistake! ” (Source 1) (Source 2)

Available via Phone and Skype 2715 Porter Street Soquel, CA 95073 (831) 476-8556 hasanna@baymoon.com Hasanna has contributed a short article on Choosing a TMS Therapist to the TMS Wiki. Survey Response / TMS Wiki Profile / Website Insurance Accepted: Not on any preferred provider lists, but some PPO plans will reimburse at a lesser amount

A traditionally trained physician, Dr. Emmett Miller is one of the founders of modern mind-body medicine. Although Dr. Miller is not trained in the treatment of TMS specifically, his treatment methods have been very helpful to others with TMS, including author Steve Ozanich, as he mentioned in a forum post (listed below). Dr. Miller now practices in California. using different holistic approaches such as guided meditation and deep relaxation as well as cognitive behavioral techniques, his practice focuses on helping people overcome a variety of chronic illnesses and problems, including stress, anxiety, and physical pain. Dr. Miller also provides life coaching sessions. (Source) Read Steve Ozanich’s forum post mentioning Dr. Miller and mindbody medicine.

Available via Phone and Skype To make an appointment with Dr. Miller, follow the steps listed on this webpage 329 S San Antonio Road, Suite 9 Los Altos, CA 94022

18834 Rock Creek Rd Nevada City, CA 95959 (530) 478-1807 (530) 478-0160 fax Website

An experienced clinical and health psychologist, Dr. Engelman has been working in the field of psychophysiologic disorders for 30 years. Part of the medical staff at St. Joseph Hospital in Orange, CA, Dr. Engelman often works with referrals from physicians (both TMS physicians specifically and physicians in general) who think thier patients may have a psychological compontent to their pain. Her approach includes mindfulness, biofeedback and other mind body approaches to working with pain. She also conducts Animal Assisted Therapy. Dr. Engelman currently has two offices, one in Orange, CA and one in Laguna Niguel, CA. (Source)

30131 Town Center Drive, Suite 292 Laguna Niguel, CA 92677 or 1310 W. Stewart Drive, # 608 Orange, CA 92868

(949) 460-4908 srephd@hushmail.com Survey Response / Website Insurance Accepted: Aetna (in network provider), Blue Cross (out of network provider)

Patti is a licensed clinical social worker. She says of TMS “Treatment consists of identifying and acknowledging the suppressed emotion (anger, sadness, fear, etc.). That’s it. It is not necessary to delve into the scenario which triggered those feelings in order to release the physical symptoms. Those symptoms were only there to protect your conscious mind from the feelings. So once the feelings are revealed, the symptoms simply fall away.” (Source)

Peaceful Sea Counseling 920 Samoa Blvd, Suite 209 Arcata, CA 95521 (707) 822-0370 Website Insurance Accepted: Most providers including Medicare, Blue Cross Blue Shield, AARP, Tricare

PPDA Practitioner Aimee Aron attained a Master of Arts degree in Clinical Mental Health with a special focus in multicultural counseling from the University of Colorado Denver. Her primary approaches are Multicultural and Existential Humanistic Therapies. These approaches demonstrate respect for and evaluate the individual, the relationships in their lives, the culture with which they identify, and how they make meaning of the experiences and elements of their lives. Value is found in examining the subjects of gender, age, ethnicity, spirituality, socio-economic status, and many other cultural forces in determining how a person has come to be who they are, what they believe about the world, and the troubles they are bringing to therapy. She helped found the Rocky Mountain Stress Check-Up organization, which reaches out to physicians about Tension Myositis Syndrome (TMS).

860 Emerson Street #0 Denver, CO 80218 (303) 900-8672 aimee@aimeearon.com Website

Pam Benison has been treating people with TMS/PPD for over 18 years. She encountered Dr. Sarno’s book, Healing Back Pain, in 1994, used the knowledge he presented to successfully treat her own back pain. Most recently, she has studied with Dr. Howard Schubiner and has incorporated his book, Unlearn Your Pain, when working with her clients. Because of her 32 years in private practice, Pam draws upon many types of therapies and relaxation techniques that eliminate stress and progress one toward satisfaction and growth. Some of these methods are: gestalt psychotherapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, insight therapy, positive psychology, couples therapy, various forms of meditation and breath work. Pam received her Bachelor of Arts from Michigan State University and her Master’s degree from the University of Denver. She is a fellow in the American Psychotherapy Association. She is willing to meet with clients via the phone or Skype.(Source)

Available via Phone and Skype 7950 So. Lincoln St., #100 Littleton, Co. 80122 and 1625 Larimer St., #2704 Denver, Co. 80202 303-797-8137 integratedwellness@hotmail.com Survey Response / Website

Dr. Henri has been treating people with Tension Myositis Syndrome (TMS) for over 9 years, and during that time has treated close to 200 people with TMS symptoms. She is able to draw upon her own experiences with chronic back pain, which she had for about one year, when she is treating her clientele. Henri uses several different therapy techniques to help her clients including EMDR, Solution-Focused Therapy, Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (MBCT), and Brainspotting depending on the situation. Henri uses these multiple techniques to design a unique treatment for her patients. Dr. Henri graduated with a Bachelors in Arts from Stanford University and received her PhD in Clinical/Health psychology from Ohio State University. In addition, Henri completed her internship and Post-doctoral fellowship from UCLA. (Source)

1325 Dry Creek Dr. Suite 101 Longmont, CO 80503 (720) 771-9248 evanahenri@accessyoureverest.com TMS Wiki Profile / Survey Response / Website Insurance Accepted: Aetna, United Behavioral Health, Humana, Mental Health Network, Rocky Mountain Health Plans, and Anthem/BCBS

PPDA Practitioner Catherine Tilford earned a Master’s of Arts in Counseling Psychology from the University of Colorado in Denver and a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Colorado Mesa University. In 2011, she was trained by the PPDA to provide Stress Check-Ups and is a founding member of the Rocky Mountain Stress Check-Up Network. Through counseling, Catherine supports personal growth by helping individuals move forward with self-awareness and strength. She provides a safe place in which you can explore your experiences and the problem or painful emotions that are standing in your way of living a personally meaningful and fulfilling life.

Available via Skype 2010 W 120th Avenue Suite 100 Denver, CO 80234 (303)720-9424 catherine@embracestrengthcounseling.com Website

Dr. Denkin has seen over 500 patients with PPD/TMS symptoms over a nine year span. She continues to receive education and training on treating PPD. Her speciality is in mind-body work, chronic pain, somatic disorders, anxiety, diet and nutrition to help others. In addition she does treat patients via skype.

Available via Phone and Skype 51 Locust Avenue Suit 302 New Canaan, CT 06840 jdenkin@denkinassociates.com Survey Response

Dr Zagar is the Director, Neuropsychology Services at The Associated Neurologists of Southern Connecticut, P.C. They offer Mind-Body Medicine, which typically focuses on interventions believed to promote health and wellness such as Yoga, Relaxation, Biofeedback, Clinical Hypnosis, and Cognitive Behavioral Therapies. The Mind-Body Medicine perspective views illness as an opportunity for personal growth and healthcare providers are guides in this transformative process. Frequently, Mind-Body Medicine focuses on the impact of stress and the development of illness and the worsening of symptoms such as pain. (Source)

Associated Neurologists of Southern Connecticut 75 Kings Highway Cutoff Fairfield, CT 06824 (203) 333-1133 Website Insurance Accepted: Aetna, Cigna, Healthnet, Medicaid, Medicare, BCBS, United Health Care, Wellpoint

Nicole Sachs is a graduate of the University of St. Thomas, and has been treating people with TMS for over 10 years. During that time she has seen over 100 clients with TMS. Sachs is the author of the book, The Meaning of Truth, which describes her practice and treatment methods. She is also a recovered TMS patient herself, and a previous member of Dr. Sarno’s Alumni Panels, where she would tell Dr. Sarno’s new patients about her own experience with TMS. In 2013, the PTPN recorded an interview with Nicole Sachs, where she again described her battle with chronic pain, and her success with the TMS approach.

Available via Phone meaningoftruth@gmail.com Website Survey Response / Profile Page / Forum Threads Nicole Sachs’s Recovery Story (video)

Dr. Leonard-Segal graduated with honors from the George Washington University Medical School and is Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology. She has practiced medicine since 1982 and has devoted the past twenty years to helping patients overcome back and neck pain, fibromyalgia, chronic tendon complaints and similar conditions. She emphasizes the mind-body connection and is one of a handful of physicians nationally who uses an approach that closely parallels the pioneering work of John E. Sarno, MD at the New York University Medical Center and the Rusk Institute. She brings her interest and expertise in mind-body medicine to the Center for Integrative Medicine. (Source1, Source2)

George Washington University Center for Integrative Medicine 908 New Hampshire Avenue, N.W. Suite 200 Washington, D.C. 20037 (202) 833-5055 (202) 833-5755 fax Website Contributed the article, “A Rheumatologist’s Experience with Psychosomatic Disorders,” in The Divided Mind, by Dr. John Sarno. 2006. Insurance Accepted: none

Dr. Brady is no longer accepting new patients. (Source) Dr Brady is the founder and Director of the Brady Institute for Health at Florida Hospital in Celebration, Florida. Dr. Brady has practiced Emergency Medicine and Urgent Care Medicine throughout Central Florida for over fifteen years and is board certified in Internal Medicine. He is the Administrator and Senior Medical Director of Florida Hospital’s sixteen Centra Care urgent care clinics. (Source)

With William Proctor, he has written a book entitled Pain Free for Life. In it, Dr. Brady describes how he overcame his own pain:

“Turn on your TV!” she said. “John Stossel is interviewing Dr. John Sarno,who says he can cure back pain like yours.” the Stossel interview of Dr. Sarno can be viewed for free here.

I wasn’t optimistic … But the more he talked, the more I listened–and the more intrigued I became. Following the show, I remembered that a friend had given me one of Sarno’s books, and after a little rummaging around, I managed to find it. … His ideas set me on a journey of healing that eventually cured my pain, and led me to where I am today. (p. 33)

Dr. Brady refers to TMS as Autonomic Overload Syndrome (AOS), but the explanation that he gives for AOS is fundamentally the same explanation that Dr. Sarno gives for TMS. (Scott Brady. Pain Free for Life. New York: Hachette Book Group. 2006.)

The Brady Institute for Health P.O. Box 2982 Windermere, FL 34786 (407) 876-1888 DrBrady@BradyInstitute.com Website

Board Certified in Psychiatry, Addiction Psychiatry, Forensic Psychiatry, Internal Medicine and Nutrition 3188 Atlanta Road Smyrna, GA 30080 (770) 319-6000 Insurance Accepted: US Healthcare, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Humana HMO, Humana PPO, Blue Choice Senior, Cigna HMO, Cigna PPO, One Health Plan of Georgia, Inc HMO / POS / Choice/ PPO

Pocatello, Idaho 208 234-1099

Dr. Stracks believes that the mind and body are intimately connected and that almost all disease processes involve an interplay between the two. His training in integrative medicine has taught him that all treatment plans must include not only a mind and body component but a social and spiritual component as well. In addition, Dr. Stracks believes that the most powerful interventions involve changes in nutrition, activity level, and other lifestyle areas, and he works to partner with patients to effect these changes. Dr. Stracks believes that many conditions can be controlled or even reversed with mind-body techniques, lifestyle changes, and other integrative therapies, and he likes working with patients and their primary physicians to safely reduce medication use whenever possible. (Source)

Northwestern Memorial Physicians Group Center for Integrative Medicine and Wellness 1100 E. Huron Street Suite 1100 Chicago, IL 60611 312-926-DOCS (3627) jstracks@yahoo.com Co-host of first TMS conference. TMS Wiki Profile / Survey Response / Q&A Answers / Website Insurance Accepted: Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Cigna, Humana, Medicaid, Medicare, TriCare, Unicare, UnitedHealthcare, and other PPO network plans

Dr Herzog has extensive training in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, and has managed thousands of impairments and disabilities from common soft tissue injuries to spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, joint replacement, amputation and stroke. He now focuses on outpatient musculoskeletal and neurologic conditions, frequently occupational in nature. He has delivered such care to patients throughout Maine since 1993.

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TDV Offshore

Posted: July 23, 2016 at 4:20 am

Im a long-term US expat, who has spent the majority of my adult life living, working and investing in numerous countries around the world, and on every inhabitable continent. Like so many of our clients, I long ago became aware of an alarming trend of rapidly declining levels of personal freedom, and our basic human right to personal privacy, in the rapidly declining industrialized world which I have happily left behind.

As it is my lifes passion, this quest for personal freedom, and our basic human right to personal privacy, I work to help others achieve those same goals, and to help their children avoid a lifetime of declining standards of living. With an apparent irreversible downward economic spiral currently in motion in North America and the European Union, not to mention Japan, the only way to avoid the negative effects of this degradation is through wide diversification. That means as to asset class, financial institutions, and jurisdiction.

I help our clients accomplish this by sharing the value of my personal experiences on a number of fronts, and obtained through years of experience in this arena. Recently, the changes have been quick, and mostly detrimental to our freedom. I work hard to stay ahead of this curve, and to help our clients do so as well.

What we do at TDV Offshore

Formation of offshore legal umbrellas in the form of an LLC or IBC

This is typically the first step in your diversification plan. We know that it takes a great deal of contemplation and soul-searching to take that first step, but history shows, that once that step is taken, our clients realize the benefits, and therefore increase their offshore foothold. The reasons to establish a company in a privacy-respecting jurisdiction are many, to name a few: 1) No recognition of foreign judgments 2) Names of owners are not public record 3) Creditors receive only charge order status in case that a local judgment has been obtained, etc etc

Bank, Brokerage and Precious Metals purchasing and storage

Now that you have a properly established structure to hold, and act as a legal umbrella for your assets, you need to move those assets to a similarly asset-protecting environment. Therefore, we will also help you to establish a bank or brokerage account in the name of the newly established company, and in one of these same jurisdictions, where sharing the names of the Ultimate Beneficial Owner (you) is also restricted by law. Of course, the name of your account will be your company name, and that company is registered in a different jurisdiction, and the disclosure of the UBOs of the company, in that separate jurisdiction, are also protected by law.

This will protect you from such threats as:

The fee to establish both an LLC, and an account in the name of the LLC, is $2,600 ($2,400 for TDV Premium subscribers). This includes apostille of company documents, delivery of the original documents to you, and our assistance in every aspect of both processes.

I stay available to you in the future to answer any questions you may have in which my experiences may be of value. Our network of clients are a group of like-minded people who are living in every corner of the globe. Im continuously connecting those who have joined our growing club to achieve a bit of synergy in our/their experiences, and on a growing number of topics.Self Directed IRA

For our US citizen clients only SD IRAs are Self-Directed tax-deferred retirement accounts. Actually, all IRAs are self-directed, but the IRS allows each administrator the opportunity to decide what types of investments to offer. As a result banks and brokerage houses only offer the products that they benefit from, like US stocks, CDs and mutual funds in which they can earn commissions from you. Under the plan we offer, there are no investment options offered, and therefore no bias nor restrictions to USD-based investments. Outside of a very few prohibited transactions, you can legally diversify your tax-deferred IRA assets out of the USD, and into foreign real estate, precious metals, foreign stocks etc, and legally maintain a qualified status and therefore stay tax-deferred, and protected from the imminent conversion to worthless government bonds.

We will assist you from start to finish to:

The fee to perform all of these steps is $3,200 ($2,900 for TDV Premium subscribers). You can be certain that your Senators and Representatives have already made this move. What are you waiting for?Trusts and Foundations

Trusts and Foundations are the best of all asset protection umbrellas for your lifes savings. With a Trust or Foundation, youre not only protected by the same privacy and anonymity laws as with companies, but have the added benefit of transferring ownership of assets to this legal vehicle, while maintaining 100% control of those assets.

As I prefer the foundation, let me use that as an example, as although the benefits of the trust and foundation are identical, the foundation has a bit more flexibility, and lower annual fees. Very briefly, the Council Members of the foundation, have a fiduciary responsibility to protect the assets for the future ownership of your named beneficiaries, but no control over those assets after we have correctly structured the ownership under an LLC with the foundation as sole member, and you would also be sole signatory on all accounts, etc.

If you would like to further discuss your specific situation, and which structure and jurisdiction(s) would best suit your needs, please complete the following contact form. I will then contact you by email in order to establish an appointment for a free consultation via either skype or by telephone.

For those who become clients, we can also discuss some ways to obtain citizenship in a new country, and obtain a more reliable travel document. There are also some ways to disengage from the US system legally if youre forced by circumstances to remain there.

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TDV Offshore

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Egoism – New World Encyclopedia

Posted: July 10, 2016 at 5:57 pm

Egoism is the concept of acting in ones own self-interest, and can be either a descriptive or a normative position. Psychological egoism, the most well-known descriptive position, holds that we always act in our own self-interest. In contrast to this, ethical egoism is a normative position: it claims that one should act in ones self-interest as this makes an action morally right, such that the claims of others should never have weight for oneself unless their good can serve ones own good. Similarly, rational egoism maintains that, in order to act rationally, one must act in ones self-interest, and the fact that an action helps another person does not alone provide a reason for performing it, unless helping the other person in some way furthers ones own interests.

All these positions deserve to be critiqued: psychological egoism in that people find the greatest happiness and meaning in states where they are self-giving, for example when in love, parenting a child, or contributing to society; and ethical egoism by the challenge of numerous philosophical and religious ethical systems that place self-interest within the context of contributing to the greater good.

Psychological egoism holds that every human has only one ultimate goal: his or her own good (where this good can variously be defined as welfare, happiness or pleasure). This description is verified by widespread and frequent observations of self-interested behavior. For instance, we often motivate people to act in certain ways by appealing to their self-interest in the form of rewards and punishments, while acts which appear altruistic are often shown to be motivated by self-interest. Likewise, one can find a non-altruistic explanation for the apparently altruistic behavior of organisms in general. Worker bees are an interesting case in point: although they seem to act solely for the sake of their hive with no concern for their own welfare, sociobiologists offer an account of this behavior in terms of their genes survival. They hypothesize that natural selection favors altruistic behavior in either cooperative relations in which all members benefit (reciprocal altruism) or familial relations (kin altruism). Both forms of altruism are concerned with the survival of ones genes: acts of reciprocal altruism increase ones chances of survival, and therefore ones genes chances of survival, while ensuring the survival of ones relations ensures the survival of a percentage of ones genes. For a worker bee, ensuring the survival of her sister worker means that she has ensured the survival of half of her genes. Thus, sociobiologists typically claim that, on a genetic level, altruism cannot exist. However, psychological egoism is a stronger position, as it claims that, regardless of what happens on a genetic level, the individual him or herself is motivated by thoughts of self-interest. Thus, while it allows for action that does not accomplish its goal of maximizing self-interest, as well as action that is at odds with ones intentions (a weak will), most forms of psychological egoism rule out both altruistic behavior and acting solely out of respect for ones duty. Importantly, psychological egoism allows for goals other than ones own self interest, but claims that these goals are then means to realizing ones own well-being.

There are in turn two forms of psychological egoism. Exclusive egoism makes the strong claim that people act exclusively out of self-interest, and therefore altruistic behavior does not, in fact, exist. On the other hand, predominant egoism makes the weaker claim that people seldom act unselfishly, and when they do so, it is typically only because their sacrifice is small and the beneficiaries gain is much larger, or when they are partial to the beneficiary in some way: when the beneficiaries are, for example, friends, lovers or family.

Exclusive egoism allows for no exceptions; this means that one instance of someone who does not act exclusively out of self-interest is sufficient to show that exclusive egoisms thesis is empirically false. Imagine a soldier throws himself on a grenade in order to prevent other people from being killed. His motivation for this act of self-sacrifice might quite plausibly be his desire to do his duty or to save the other peoples lives, while attempting to explain his action in terms of self-interest would appear to be a wholly implausible move. The exclusive egoist may want to defend her position by arguing for some kind of ulterior self-interested motive, such as pleasure. Perhaps our soldier believes in an afterlife in which he will be rewarded ten-fold for his apparently selfless act on earth, or perhaps, if he had not hurled himself on the grenade, he would be overcome by guilt and a concomitant sense of self-loathing. In both cases then, he is, at least from his perspective, acting in his self-interest by acting in this apparently selfless manner. There are two problems with this response. The first is that, while it might explain many instances of apparent self-sacrifice as motivated by egoistic concerns, it does not necessarily cover all cases. The psychological egoist must argue that all instances of ostensible altruistic behavior are in fact motivated by self-interested desires. If, for instance, our soldier disagrees with this, and claims that his action was truly altruistic in motivation, the exclusive egoist must respond that he is lying or is deceiving himself. At this point, however, exclusive egoism turns out to be trivially true, which means that it is unfalsifiable, since there is no empirical instance that could in principle disprove the hypothesis. As with the trivially true statement all ostriches that live on Mars have gold and purple polka dotted wings, this version of psychological egoism provides no useful information and therefore fails as an empirical theory. It does not allow us to distinguish, for instance, between our soldier and the soldier who thrusts a child onto the grenade in order to save himself. Whereas we generally think that the latter is behaving selfishly, while our soldier is acting in a selfless manner, exclusive egoism maintains that both soldiers are equally selfish, because both are acting in their self-interest.

Alternatively, the psychological egoist might opt for a non-trivial response to the soldier counter-example. She could argue that, as infants, we have only self-regarding desires; desires for our own well-being, for instance. However, as we grow older, we find that desiring things for their own sake eventually satisfies our self-regarding desires. We then come to desire these things for their own sake. For example, I might detest exercise, but also find that exercising results in physical well-being; after a while, I will begin to desire exercise for its own sake. This would preclude the common objection to psychological egoism, that one must desire things other than ones welfare in order to realize ones welfare. However, then the psychological egoist will have moved away from exclusive egoism. It may be true that our soldier would not have had a present desire to save others, unless saving others was connected in the past with increasing his welfare, but this does not mean that his present desire is selfish. At this point, the psychological egoist could adopt the weaker stance of predominant egoism which allows for exceptions, and thereby forestall counter-examples like our heroic soldier; moreover, predominant egoism is both an empirically plausible and non-trivial position.

In her novel, Atlas Shrugged, Russian emigre Ayn Rand sketches the portrait of a man who feels responsible for himself and no one else. John Galt is the archetype of the individual who practices what Rand calls the virtue of selfishness: a man for whom true morality consists in resisting the temptations of self-sacrifice, sympathy and generosity. In the fictional figure of John Galt we find the embodiment of egoism as an ideal. Similarly, the move from psychological egoism to ethical egoism is a move from a descriptive to a normative position. Ethical egoism claims that for ones action to count as morally right it is both necessary and sufficient that one act in ones self-interest. Precisely how one acts in ones self-interest is a matter of some divergence among ethical egoists. As with psychological egoism, ethical egoism comes in both a maximizing and a non-maximizing flavor: the former holds that self-interest must be maximized for an action to count as ethical, while the latter simply claims that one should act in ones self-interest and thus leaves the possibility for acting in others interest open. There is also a distinction between short-term and long-term interests: I might gain a short-term benefit by stealing from my friends, but experience a long-term loss when they discover the theft and I lose those friends. In addition, ethical egoism can also apply to rules or character traits, as well as acts. Finally, acting in ones self-interest means acting for ones own good, but this good can variously be defined as ones happiness, pleasure or well-being. There are various permutations of these conceptions, but considering that the arguments for and against them are generally relevantly similar, I will very broadly define ethical egoism as the thesis which states that in order for ones actions to count as ethical, one should act to promote ones self-interest, where self-interest is taken to mean ones own good.

There are several arguments in support of ethical egoism. Ethical egoists occasionally appeal to the findings of psychological egoism as support for their normative claims; however, regardless of whether psychological egoism is true or not, the jump from a descriptive to a normative position is fallacious, as one cannot use supposed existing conditions as justification for how one ought to behave. A more valid move is to argue that, as psychological egoism is true, it is impossible to motivate people on non-egoistic grounds. Thus, ethical egoism is the most practical moral theory, or the most capable of motivating people to act ethically. However, as we have seen, exclusive egoism just seems false, and substituting it with predominant egoism loses the crucial claim that it is impossible to motivate people to behave altruistically. On the other hand, if psychological egoism is true, it follows from psychological egoism that I cannot intend to perform an action which I believe is not in my self-interest. However, if I am wrong, and this action is in my self-interest, then ethical egoism stipulates that I should perform an action that I cannot intend. The appeal to psychological egoism therefore fails to ensure its practicality.

However, this is not necessarily a shortcoming of an ethical theory, as part of the value of an ethical theory may lie in its offering us an ideal for us to live up to. Setting aside the appeal to its supposed practicality, ethical egoists might alternatively claim that ethical egoism best fits our commonsense moral judgements. For instance, it captures the intuition that I should not let others exploit me, and unlike consequentialism, allows me to keep some good for myself, like a house, even though giving this house to someone else might benefit him slightly more. Moreover, it stipulates that it is often in ones best interests to ostensibly take other peoples interests into account so as to secure their cooperation. I derive a much larger long-term benefit if I act generously and compassionately towards my friends, for example, than if I steal from them, even though theft might provide the greatest short-term benefit to me. Nevertheless, it appears that ethical egoism is also at odds with some of our most deeply held ethical beliefs. It mandates that one should only ever help someone else if doing so benefits oneself, which means that one is not morally obligated to help those who cannot help or hinder one. Imagine I can easily save a drowning child, but none of the players in this scenario can offer me any beneficial cooperation in return for saving the child (like praise) or negative retaliation for failing to help (like scorn). Further, say that I am indifferent to the situation presented to me, and regardless of what I do, I will feel no sense of guilt or pleasure, then ethical egoism will remain silent as to whether I should save the child. Moreover, if there is some slight uncompensated sacrifice I will have to make, like getting my shoes wet, then ethical egoism will tell me to refrain from saving the drowning child. However, we generally think that, in this case, there is a moral obligation to save the child, and ethical egoism can neither explain how such a duty might (validly) arise, nor generate such a duty. Ethical egoism therefore appears to be morally insensitive to situations which we ordinarily think demand great moral sensitivity. We can further see that ethical egoism will potentially generate counter-intuitive duties in situations where the individual in need of help cannot reciprocate (like physically or mentally disabled people) or where the sacrifice one might need to make is not compensatable. Ethical egoism will, for instance, condemn the action of the soldier who throws himself on the grenade as ethically reprehensible, precisely because it entails an irreversible sacrifice (loss of life) for the soldier, while we ordinarily think it is an ethically admirable action, or at the very least, not a morally repugnant one.

Furthermore, a number of critics have argued that egoism yields contradictory moral imperatives. There are generally two inconsistency charges against ethical egoism. The weaker of the two lays this charge: say ethical egoism recommends that X and Y buy a particular item of clothing on sale, since buying this item is, for some reason, in the self-interest of each. But there is only one remaining article; hence, ethical egoism recommends an impossible situation. However, the ethical egoist can reply that ethical egoism does not provide neutral criteria: it advocates to X buying the article of clothing for X, and advocates to Y that Y buy the article for Y, but ethical egoism has nothing to say on the value of X and Y buying the same article of clothing.

The second inconsistency argument claims that, in any given situation, the ethical egoist must aim to promote her own self-interest, but if her brand of egoism is to count as an ethical theory, she must simultaneously will that everyone else also act to promote their own self-interest, for one of the formal constraints on an ethical theory is that it be universalisable. Say I am a shopkeeper, and it is in my best interest to sell my products at the highest practically possible profit, it will generally not be in my clients best interests to buy my products at these high prices. Then if I am an ethical egoist, I am committed to recommending a contradictory state of affairs: that I both sell the products at the highest possible price and that my customers pay less than the highest possible price. The ethical theorist, however, can respond that, although she morally recommends that the customers pay less than the highest possible price, this does not necessarily mean that she desires it. Jesse Kalin provides an analogy with competitive sports: in a game of chess, I will be trying my utmost to win, but I will also expect my opponent to do the same, and I may even desire that he play as good a game as possible, because then the game will be of a far higher standard. If the analogy with competitive gaming holds, it is therefore not inconsistent for me to recommend both that I attempt to sell my products at the highest possible price and that my customers attempt to buy them at lower than the highest possible price.

However, this move to making an analogy with competitive games cannot preclude the worry that ethical egoism is not sufficiently public for it to count as an ethical theory. What is meant by this is that ethical egoism is at odds with public morality (which generally appears to value altruism) and one can therefore imagine many cases in which the ethical egoist might find it in her interests not to profess ethical egoism. Imagine I am an ethical egoist and I donate a large sum to a charity because it gives my company a good image and I receive a large tax deduction for doing so. Then it is most definitely not in my best interests to reveal these reasons; rather, it is to my advantage that I pretend to have done so out of a spirit of generosity and kindness. Leaving aside worries of duplicitous and unreliable behavior, it does not seem as if ethical egoism can truly be made public without the ethical egoists interests being compromised. Yet it seems as if an ethical theory requires precisely this ability to be made public. Moreover, although it meets the formal constraints of an ethical theory it must be normative and universalisable as noted above, it also fails to provide a single neutral ranking that each agent must follow in cases where there is a conflict of interests. Just what makes for a moral theory, however, is contentious, and the ethical theorist can subsequently respond to any argument against ethical egoisms status as an ethical theory by claiming that the failed criteria are not really constraints that an ethical theory must adhere to. A more elegant solution, however, is to move to rational egoism, which might provide the ethical egoist with non-ethical reasons for adhering to ethical egoism.

Rational egoism maintains that it is both necessary and sufficient for an action to be rational that it promotes ones self-interest. As with ethical egoism, rational egoism comes in varying flavors. It can be maximizing or non-maximizing, or can apply to rules or character traits instead of actions. Certain versions might claim that acting in ones self-interest is either sufficient but not necessary, or necessary but not sufficient for an action to count as rational. However, as with ethical egoism, relevantly similar objections to and defenses for the various species of ethical egoism can be made. The salient common feature amongst all variants is that all claim that the fact that an action helps another person does not alone provide a reason for performing it, unless helping the other person in some way furthers ones own interests. Stronger versions might also hold that the only underived reason for action is self-interest.

In support of their thesis, rational egoists most commonly appeal to the way in which rational egoism best fits our ordinary judgements about what makes action rational. However, as we saw with the soldier counter-example, both psychological and ethical egoism fail to make sense of his action, and rational egoism will similarly generate a counter-intuitive response to this example. It will classify his action as fundamentally non-rational because it has permanently violated his self-interest. However, we would ordinarily characterize his action as rational, because it realizes his strong non-self-interested preference to save the lives of others. In other words, we take the safety of others to be a legitimate motivation for his action, whereas his hurling himself on a grenade in order to save a chocolate cake would ordinarily be seen as non-rational. Yet rational egoism would not allow us to distinguish between these two cases, because it does not recognize the demands of others as alone providing one with reason to act in a certain way.

Rational egoism furthermore appears to make an unjustified weighted distinction between ones own self-interest and the good of others. Imagine I decide that I should act to increase the good of brown-eyed people over that of others. Justifying this preferential treatment on the grounds that brown-eyed people just are more deserving of preferential treatment is not rational. James Rachels argues that ethical (and here, rational) egoism, makes a similarly unwarranted or arbitrary move, because it claims that I ought to act in one persons interest (myself). The rational egoist might want to respond that non-arbitrary distinctions can be made by ones preferences. The fact that I like oranges and not apples makes my decision to buy apples rather than oranges non-arbitrary, and similarly, my preference for my own good makes my commitment to achieving my own good non-arbitrary. However, as we have seen, there are cases (as with the soldier example) where I might lack a preference for my own welfare. In these instances, rational egoism cannot give me a reason to pursue my self-interest over that of others. Nevertheless, rational egoism might hold that, in these cases I am wrong, simply because we must take it as a ground assumption that our own good comes before that of others. In other words, the preference for ones own good needs no further justification than the fact it is ones own good that one is pursuing. When it comes to the preferential treatment of brown-eyed people, we generally do not accept their being brown-eyed as a good reason for their preferential treatment, but when it comes to acting for our own good, we seem to take the fact that it is our own good as a reasonable justification for doing so; we do not ask why acting in ones own good is pertinent.

However, although this may be so, this argument does not demonstrate that acting to promote ones own good is always sufficient or necessary for an action to count as rational. There are instances where we take an action to be rational, but where the agent makes no reference to pursuing his own good as justification for performing the action. The villagers of Le Chambon provide us with a real-life example of this. Le Chambon was a pacifist French village responsible for saving the lives of several thousand Jews from the Nazis, often at a great risk to the inhabitants. The reason they gave for this altruistic behavior was that it was simply their duty to help anybody in need. Here, no reference is made to their own good (and indeed, their own welfare was often severely jeopardized by their actions), and we generally take their concern for the others welfare as a good reason for their actions.

At present, there seems to be no good reason to accept the theses of psychological, ethical or rational egoism. Nevertheless, egoism in general presents us with a useful insight into the moral life by pointing out that, contra what many of us might suppose, morality and self-interest do not necessarily conflict. Indeed, there may be many cases in which there are good self-regarding reasons for acting ethically and egoism forces us to question whether we pay sufficient attention to legitimate self-interest when assessing moral situations.

A small selection of literature in popular culture dealing with ethical egoism and altruism.

All links retrieved September 14, 2013.

This article began as an original work prepared for New World Encyclopedia and is provided to the public according to the terms of the New World Encyclopedia:Creative Commons CC-by-sa 3.0 License (CC-by-sa), which may be used and disseminated with proper attribution. Any changes made to the original text since then create a derivative work which is also CC-by-sa licensed. To cite this article click here for a list of acceptable citing formats.

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Egoism – New World Encyclopedia

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FE Trustnet Offshore: Offshore Top Mutual Funds | Offshore …

Posted: June 16, 2016 at 5:52 pm

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Freedom! '90 – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Posted: May 31, 2016 at 1:42 am

“Freedom ’90” (also known simply as “Freedom”) is a song written, produced,and performed by George Michael, and released on Columbia Records in 1990. The “’90” added to the end of the title is to prevent confusion with a hit by Michael’s former band, Wham!, also titled “Freedom”.

It was the third single taken from Listen Without Prejudice Vol. 1, though released as the second single from the album in Australia. “Freedom ’90” was one of a few uptempo songs on this album, it was also a major hit and went to #8 in the US. The song is referring to Michael’s past success with Wham!, yet also shows a new side of himself as a new man, who is more cynical about the music business than he had been before. Michael refused to appear in the video and allowed a group of supermodels to appear instead.

George Michael performed the song during the closing ceremony of the 2012 London Olympics.

By 1990, Michael had grown weary of the pressures of fame, telling the Los Angeles Times, “At some point in your career, the situation between yourself and the camera reverses. For a certain number of years, you court it and you need it, but ultimately, it needs you more and it’s a bit like a relationship. The minute that happens, it turns you off … and it does feel like it is taking something from you.” He decided that he no longer wanted to do photo shoots or music videos,[1][2] saying, “I would like to never step in front of a camera again.”[2]

Although he relented and decided to make a video for his new song, he still refused to appear in it. Instead, inspired by Peter Lindbergh’s now-iconic portrait of Naomi Campbell, Linda Evangelista, Tatjana Patitz, Christy Turlington, and Cindy Crawford for the January 1990 cover of the British edition of Vogue, Michael asked the five models to appear in the video. While it was not uncommon at the time for models to appear in music videos, usually such models played the love interest of the singer, as with Christie Brinkley’s appearance in her then-husband Billy Joel’s “Uptown Girl” video, or Turlington’s appearance in Duran Duran’s “Notorious” video when she was 17 years old. For “Freedom ’90”, the five models would not portray Michael’s on-screen girlfriends, but would lip-synch the song in his place. Evangelista took some persuading before agreeing to appear in the video, saying, “He thought it would make us into a big deal, that it would be good for us. I was like, ‘Please, we’re here. We’ve already arrived!'” After speaking with Michael, she was convinced, and rearranged her schedule. In a 2015 Vanity Fair article, Evangelista reflected on her decision positively, saying, “Little did I know that to this day, when someone meets me for the first time, they bring up that video. That’s what they remember. So yeah, George was right.” An initial disagreement over their salaries was resolved when Annie Veltri, who represented Crawford, Evangelista, Campbell, and Patitz at Elite Model Management, made it clear that all of her clients would receive the same compensation$15,000 a day.[1]

The video was directed by David Fincher, whose “dark and graphic style, distinguished by velvety-rich color, moody interiors and crisp storytelling”, had earned him notice for his work on Madonna’s “Express Yourself” video the previous year. His team for the multi-day “Freedom! ’90” shoot included Camilla Nickerson, who went on to become a Vogue contributing editor, as the clothes stylist, hair stylist Guido and makeup artist Carol Brown. The video was shot in a vast building in the London Borough of Merton that Nickerson says exhibited “a grandeur and a Blade Runner feel.”[1]

The 92-sketch storyboard called for each model to film on separate days, with the exception of Evangelista and Turlington, who appear in a scene together. Each model was assigned a verse to lip-synch, while for the song’s chorus, Fincher envisioned the three iconic items from Michael’s 1987 music video “Faith” that had come to symbolize his public image: his leather jacket, a Wurlitzer jukebox, and guitar, exploding in a ball of flame at each occurrence of the word “freedom” during the chorus. Whereas “Faith” had opened with a jukebox phonograph needle touching a vinyl record, “Freedom! ’90” opens with a compact disc player’s laser beam reading a CD.[1]

Nickerson envisioned a “low-key street style” for the wardrobe, which she characterizes as “a sort of undone beauty”, in contrast to the prevailing “vampy, larger-than-life” direction in which the fashion industry, typified by models doing film work, was moving at the time. The black sweater worn by Evangelista was from Nickerson’s own closet, and the studded biker boots worn by Campbell belonged to Nickerson’s boyfriend. Most of the wardrobe budget, however, went to the 60-foot-long linen sheet used by Turlington, the nature of which was specified by Fincher. Guido looked to each model’s personality to devise hairdos that would effect a sense of their “true beauty”. Evangelista was up until 3:00am the night before the shoot dying her hair platinum blonde, which reflected the cool-blue lights of the set, while Campbell’s hair was curled and pulled up with a headband for a 1960s “tough chic” in order to highlight her movement for a shot in which she dances solo. Patitz’s hair was framed with soft curls and Turlington’s was gelled back to exploit her statuesque form as her character crosses the screen trailing the linen sheet. Brown also tried to bring out each model’s personality with makeup, saying, “Cindy was the sexy one; Christy was the cool, classic one; and Linda was the chameleon. She could do anything.” Following Fincher’s instruction that Crawford’s makeup look “completely trashed, as if she’d been in a steamy atmosphere,” Brown did Crawford’s makeup, and then oiled it down by covering her with glycerin. Crawford spent most of her time topless and sitting in an empty bathtub, resting on an apple box so that enough of her would be visible. Brown recalls, “The poor girl must have been freezing because it wasn’t hot in there. I remember her walking across that studio so fearlessly and proudly and not making any sort of a big deal that she was wearing only a G-string.”[1]

Despite not appearing in the video, Michael was on set. Guido recalls, “We’d drink red wine and sing songs in the evening because it kind of went on late, and George was just like one of the gang, in the trailers, hanging out.” On the last day of shooting, Brown broke her own rule about not asking the celebrities she worked with for autographs. On her copy of the video’s production booklet, Michael wrote: “Thanks, I never looked so good.”[1]

The video premiered a few weeks after the shoot, and went into heavy rotation on MTV. Judy McGrath, a former CEO of MTV Networks reminisces, “I remember watching it and thinking, This is entrancing. The ’90s was a time of incredible creative freedom, when you had a generation of directors making a new visual language, and you had musicians driving the pop-culture conversation, and ‘Freedom’ kind of kicked off that whole period.” A few months later, at the conclusion[3] of his 1991 fall fashion show in Milan, designer Gianni Versace sent Crawford, Evangelista, Campbell and Turlington down the runway. The four of them stood in a huddle, mouthing along to “Freedom”. It marked the zenith of the 1990s supermodel era, which would end with the grunge movement, which was ushered in by Nirvana’s 1991 album “Nevermind”.[1]

Reflecting on the video in 2015, Crawford stated that at the time, they perceived themselves to simply be making “a really cool video”, but that in retrospect, the vide
o exhibits a dark humor: As MTV had altered the music industry so that physical beauty was now necessary to sell music, the video used five beautiful faces in lieu of the song’s vocalist in order to poke fun at this.[1]

“Freedom ’90” was 6:30 long, but a shorter version was made available for radio consumption cutting down the intro and the bridge. The addition of the year to the title was to distinguish the song from “Freedom”, a #1 hit in the UK for Wham! in 1984 (#3 in the US in 1985). It was the second US single from the album Listen Without Prejudice Vol. 1, and had contrasting fortunes on each side of the Atlanticit peaked #28 on the UK Singles Chart, but was a major success on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, reaching #8 and selling over 500,000 copies to earn a Gold certification from the RIAA. It remained in the Billboard Top 40 for 12 weeks in late 1990 and early 1991.[4]In Canada, Michael achieved another charttopper.

CD single (USA) (Released 15 December 1990)

“Freedom” was covered in 1996 by Robbie Williams who released it as his debut single since leaving Take That. It reached #2 in the UK, twenty-six places higher than George Michael’s original, and had not been included on any of his albums until 2010, when it was included on Williams’ greatest hits album In and Out of Consciousness: The Greatest Hits 19902010. The single had sold 280,000 copies by the end of 1996, being certified Silver by the BPI.[14] Williams had left Take That the previous year and therefore could identify himself with much of the sentiment in the song, although he did not use the line “we had every bigshot goodtime band on the run boy, we were living in a fantasy” in his version. The music video shows Williams dancing in the sea and in a field, celebrating his separation from his former group. Williams later admitted that the song had not even been recorded by the scheduled date of filming and instead mimed to George Michael’s version of the song.

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Freedom! ’90 – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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TransHuman Consulting | Unleashing Human Potential

Posted: May 22, 2016 at 10:41 pm

Executive and Leadership Coaching

Coaching for Managers

Building Coaching Culture

Transition Coaching

Organisation Development

Assessment Center

DNA – Values , Vision and Mission

Team Building Workshop

Effective Communication

NeuroLeadership

Re-Write Leadership Practices

Brain Sciences Based Coaching

NLP for Excellence

NLP Practitioner Certification

NLP Master Practitioner

NLP Psychotherapy

NLP and Applied NLP Programs

Unleashing the Human Potential

Do you ever feel stuck? Are there things you wish you could change.[more]

The Neuro Leadership Program aims at highlights some of the key brain insights relating to leadership. [More]

TransHuman Consulting is a Training and Consulting Service provider company, founded by Paritosh Sharan, an Executive Coach and an OD Consultant. TransHuman Consulting partner with Individuals and Organisations together in their transformational journey and help them unleashing their inner potentialso that they could achieve their desired outcome. Our purpose is to develop and support values-based visionary leadership in all fields of human endeavour.

Our innovative and diversified range of training programs and consulting services are designed and delivered by a team of full time consultants experienced in providing solutions relevant to this part of the world and most importantly tailored for the clients need.

Devesh Sinha, President , ESSPL

– Bhushan Desai, Director , Praendex Management Resources Pvt. Ltd.

Saurabh Arvind, AVP and Head, Project Management Excellence at Tech Mahindra.

Nrusimha Rao, SFO, USA

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TransHuman Consulting | Unleashing Human Potential

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TransHuman Consulting | Unleashing Human Potential

Posted: at 8:46 pm

Executive and Leadership Coaching

Coaching for Managers

Building Coaching Culture

Transition Coaching

Organisation Development

Assessment Center

DNA – Values , Vision and Mission

Team Building Workshop

Effective Communication

NeuroLeadership

Re-Write Leadership Practices

Brain Sciences Based Coaching

NLP for Excellence

NLP Practitioner Certification

NLP Master Practitioner

NLP Psychotherapy

NLP and Applied NLP Programs

Unleashing the Human Potential

Do you ever feel stuck? Are there things you wish you could change.[more]

The Neuro Leadership Program aims at highlights some of the key brain insights relating to leadership. [More]

TransHuman Consulting is a Training and Consulting Service provider company, founded by Paritosh Sharan, an Executive Coach and an OD Consultant. TransHuman Consulting partner with Individuals and Organisations together in their transformational journey and help them unleashing their inner potentialso that they could achieve their desired outcome. Our purpose is to develop and support values-based visionary leadership in all fields of human endeavour.

Our innovative and diversified range of training programs and consulting services are designed and delivered by a team of full time consultants experienced in providing solutions relevant to this part of the world and most importantly tailored for the clients need.

Devesh Sinha, President , ESSPL

– Bhushan Desai, Director , Praendex Management Resources Pvt. Ltd.

Saurabh Arvind, AVP and Head, Project Management Excellence at Tech Mahindra.

Nrusimha Rao, SFO, USA

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TransHuman Consulting | Unleashing Human Potential

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About NSA Media

Posted: March 30, 2016 at 5:46 pm

NSA Media is a media planning and buying agency that delivers significant business results for our client partners by developing, negotiating and executing the mosteffective print and digital media plans on a locally relevant basis.

We were founded on the idea that media can deliver more favorable returns through a more intelligent approach to the media buying process.

Our consumer-centric approach to buying media incorporates a comprehensive mix of advanced analytics, intelligent insights, competitive rates and flawless execution to ensure our clients media investments are fully optimized.

We design Interconnected media strategies that reflect the complex usage habits of consumers, delivered at the right time, using the right platform, at the most efficient intensity level.

Established in 1991, our company has over 200 employeesand is basedin Downers Grove, IL. NSA Media is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Interpublic Group of Companies (NYSE:IPG).

For information about IPG Mediabrands or IPG,please tap or click their logos below to visit their websites.

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About NSA Media

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