Tag Archives: collaboration

Intro to Artificial Intelligence Course and Training Online …

Posted: July 5, 2016 at 11:42 pm

Featured Celebrate our 5th birthday with a 55% discount! Enroll through this link by 7/10/16 & the discount will automatically apply.

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Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a field that has a long history but is still constantly and actively growing and changing. In this course, youll learn the basics of modern AI as well as some of the representative applications of AI. Along the way, we also hope to excite you about the numerous applications and huge possibilities in the field of AI, which continues to expand human capability beyond our imagination.

Note: Parts of this course are featured in the Machine Learning Engineer Nanodegree and the Data Analyst Nanodegree programs. If you are interested in AI, be sure to check out those programs as well!

Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology is increasingly prevalent in our everyday lives. It has uses in a variety of industries from gaming, journalism/media, to finance, as well as in the state-of-the-art research fields from robotics, medical diagnosis, and quantum science. In this course youll learn the basics and applications of AI, including: machine learning, probabilistic reasoning, robotics, computer vision, and natural language processing.

Some of the topics in Introduction to Artificial Intelligence will build on probability theory and linear algebra. You should have understanding of probability theory comparable to that covered in our Intro to Statistics course.

See the Technology Requirements for using Udacity.

Peter Norvig is Director of Research at Google Inc. He is also a Fellow of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence and the Association for Computing Machinery. Norvig is co-author of the popular textbook Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach. Prior to joining Google he was the head of the Computation Sciences Division at NASA Ames Research Center.

Sebastian Thrun is a Research Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University, a Google Fellow, a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the German Academy of Sciences. Thrun is best known for his research in robotics and machine learning, specifically his work with self-driving cars.

This class is self paced. You can begin whenever you like and then follow your own pace. Its a good idea to set goals for yourself to make sure you stick with the course.

This class will always be available!

Take a look at the Class Summary, What Should I Know, and What Will I Learn sections above. If you want to know more, just enroll in the course and start exploring.

Yes! The point is for you to learn what YOU need (or want) to learn. If you already know something, feel free to skip ahead. If you ever find that youre confused, you can always go back and watch something that you skipped.

Its completely free! If youre feeling generous, we would love to have you contribute your thoughts, questions, and answers to the course discussion forum.

Collaboration is a great way to learn. You should do it! The key is to use collaboration as a way to enhance learning, not as a way of sharing answers without understanding them.

Udacity classes are a little different from traditional courses. We intersperse our video segments with interactive questions. There are many reasons for including these questions: to get you thinking, to check your understanding, for fun, etc… But really, they are there to help you learn. They are NOT there to evaluate your intelligence, so try not to let them stress you out.

Learn actively! You will retain more of what you learn if you take notes, draw diagrams, make notecards, and actively try to make sense of the material.

Nanodegree is a trademark of Udacity 20112016 Udacity, Inc.

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Intro to Artificial Intelligence Course and Training Online …

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Intro to Artificial Intelligence Course and Training …

Posted: June 28, 2016 at 2:46 am

Watch Video

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a field that has a long history but is still constantly and actively growing and changing. In this course, youll learn the basics of modern AI as well as some of the representative applications of AI. Along the way, we also hope to excite you about the numerous applications and huge possibilities in the field of AI, which continues to expand human capability beyond our imagination.

Note: Parts of this course are featured in the Machine Learning Engineer Nanodegree and the Data Analyst Nanodegree programs. If you are interested in AI, be sure to check out those programs as well!

Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology is increasingly prevalent in our everyday lives. It has uses in a variety of industries from gaming, journalism/media, to finance, as well as in the state-of-the-art research fields from robotics, medical diagnosis, and quantum science. In this course youll learn the basics and applications of AI, including: machine learning, probabilistic reasoning, robotics, computer vision, and natural language processing.

Some of the topics in Introduction to Artificial Intelligence will build on probability theory and linear algebra. You should have understanding of probability theory comparable to that covered in our Intro to Statistics course.

See the Technology Requirements for using Udacity.

Peter Norvig is Director of Research at Google Inc. He is also a Fellow of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence and the Association for Computing Machinery. Norvig is co-author of the popular textbook Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach. Prior to joining Google he was the head of the Computation Sciences Division at NASA Ames Research Center.

Sebastian Thrun is a Research Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University, a Google Fellow, a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the German Academy of Sciences. Thrun is best known for his research in robotics and machine learning, specifically his work with self-driving cars.

This class is self paced. You can begin whenever you like and then follow your own pace. Its a good idea to set goals for yourself to make sure you stick with the course.

This class will always be available!

Take a look at the Class Summary, What Should I Know, and What Will I Learn sections above. If you want to know more, just enroll in the course and start exploring.

Yes! The point is for you to learn what YOU need (or want) to learn. If you already know something, feel free to skip ahead. If you ever find that youre confused, you can always go back and watch something that you skipped.

Its completely free! If youre feeling generous, we would love to have you contribute your thoughts, questions, and answers to the course discussion forum.

Collaboration is a great way to learn. You should do it! The key is to use collaboration as a way to enhance learning, not as a way of sharing answers without understanding them.

Udacity classes are a little different from traditional courses. We intersperse our video segments with interactive questions. There are many reasons for including these questions: to get you thinking, to check your understanding, for fun, etc… But really, they are there to help you learn. They are NOT there to evaluate your intelligence, so try not to let them stress you out.

Learn actively! You will retain more of what you learn if you take notes, draw diagrams, make notecards, and actively try to make sense of the material.

Nanodegree is a trademark of Udacity 20112016 Udacity, Inc.

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Intro to Artificial Intelligence Course and Training …

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NanoTech Institute – The University of Texas at Dallas

Posted: June 12, 2016 at 8:22 pm

Guided by theory and enabled by synthesis, the NanoTech Institute develops new science and technology exploiting the nanoscale.

Our researchers inspire students by creating an atmosphere of excitement, fun, and creativity.

Quick Links

Facilities Campus Maps Ray H. Baughman NanoWeb Forms Facebook YouTube

Mailing Address:

The University of Texas at Dallas [ Recipient’s Name ] * The Alan G MacDiarmid NanoTech Institute, BE 26 800 West Campbell Road Richardson, TX 75080-3021

Phone: 972-883-6530 Fax: 972-883-6529

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On August 20th, the 2013 class of NanoExplorers will presenting their research that they conducted along the researchers of the NanoTech Institute. See this flyer for more information. See the schedule here.

An article covering Ali Aliev’s and his collegues work on carbon nanotube thermoacustic transducers has been put online. You can read the whole article here.

The faculty, staff, and students of the Alan G. MacDiarmid NanoTech Institute at The University of Texas at Dallas welcome the 2013 class of NanoExplorers. We had over 200 highly qualified applicants this year. (see more)

The talk is devoted to recent achievements made by our Russian (NUST MISiS, Moscow) and French (G2Elab, Grenoble) groups in application of original shape memory composites for both microactuation and thermal energy harvesting. Novel prestrained scheme of shape memory composite allows creating actuators able to giant reversible bending deformation. (see more)

The faculty, staff, and students of the Alan G. MacDiarmid NanoTech Institute at The University of Texas at Dallas welcome the 2012 class of NanoExplorers. We had over 200 highly qualified applicants this year. (see more)

Read about former NanoExplorer Amy Chyao and her work at UT Dallas

Experience the collaboration of the NanoTech Institute with the University of Guanajuato (Guanajuato, Mexico) through the eyes of Raquel Ovalle Robles.

Discover the NanoTech Institute’s work through its library of publications.

Use the NanoTech Institute’s facilities to conduct cutting-edge research.

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NanoTech Institute – The University of Texas at Dallas

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'Space-age' research looks to provide new human health insights

Posted: April 11, 2015 at 7:46 am

IMAGE:NASA’s Rodent Habitat module is shown with both access doors open. view more

Credit: NASA/Dominic Hart

Imagine if all of your physiological changes were hyper accelerated so that you passed through life cycles in weeks as opposed to decades. You’d be able to grow a beard overnight or your hair might begin graying in a matter of days or maybe menopause would come knocking by next weekend. This may seem like a far stretch from reality, but spaceflight causes significant physiological changes including an accelerated loss of muscle and bone density, and immune system dysfunction that parallel the effects of natural aging here on Earth. This makes the International Space Station (ISS) is an ideal place for scientists to conduct research on aging at a “space-aged” pace.

One of the several investigations that are part of the second rodent research mission, Rodent Research-2 will focus on the age-old phenomenon of aging. This research, sponsored by Novartis Biomedical Research Institute, the U.S. Department of Defense and the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) is slated to launch to the space station via SpaceX-6. Researchers will use the study to analyze how spaceflight and exposure to the microgravity environment impacts a model organism’s musculoskeletal system.

Studying the disease mechanisms of muscle wasting and bone loss, which are associated with both spaceflight and aging, can provide greater insight into these processes and help to identify potential new drug targets and develop new therapeutics for other conditions as well. Advanced treatments for diseases like osteoporosis, muscular dystrophy, cancer, spinal cord injury, and kidney failure could all be developed through valuable data gained through this investigation and subsequent studies.

The musculoskeletal system is made up of bones, muscles, ligaments, tendons, cartilage and joints. This biological system is greatly affected by the aging process and certain diseases, as well as spaceflight. Researchers anticipate that the science conducted on the space station will provide insight into molecular variations induced by spaceflight, and can applied to our knowledge of similar changes on Earth.

The ISS National Lab is now equipped with specialized hardware, like the Bone Densitometer Locker. This facility, which launched with the previous rodent research mission, allows scientists to gather data in real time. Researchers will track numerous data points from the mice test subjects, including gene expression, various biomarkers from several biological systems, and molecular changes within musculoskeletal tissues.

A second part of the Rodent Research-2 study is scheduled to launch aboard SpaceX-7 and will include three separate investigations sponsored by NASA. Michael Pecaut, Ph.D., of Loma Linda University is the principal investigator for a study of the effects of spaceflight on immune system function. Michael Delp, Ph.D., of Florida State University, is the principal investigator for a study of spaceflight-induced changes in the structure of the blood-brain barrier. Data from a third study of the effect of spaceflight on liver metabolism and gene expression will be shared with the scientific community via GeneLab, NASA’s new open access system for sharing of genomics data gained from research in space. NASA’s Ames Research Center is responsible for carrying out all of the CASIS and NASA-funded science on this mission.

Collaboration between other government agencies and commercial entities, facilitated by CASIS and NASA, are helping to maximize the research capabilities of the ISS National Lab for the benefit of Earth.

We may still have to wait years to experience our own aging–which is likely a good thing–but thanks to space station research we may have help for treating those age-related challenges through the accelerated knowledge gained through studies like Rodent Research-2.

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'Space-age' research looks to provide new human health insights

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Broad, Bayer expand partnership to develop therapies for cardiovascular disease

Posted: March 31, 2015 at 10:45 pm

The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have expanded their collaboration with Bayer HealthCare to include cardiovascular genomics and drug discovery. The goal of this new part of the alliance is to leverage insights from human genetics to help create new cardiovascular therapies.

“It is exciting to be expanding on our ongoing, successful partnership with Bayer in oncology,” said Professor Eric Lander, President and Director of Broad Institute. “We are looking forward to a fruitful collaboration combining Bayer’s expertise in the cardiovascular therapeutic area with Broad’s deep knowledge of genomics and biology”.

Cardiovascular genomics is an emerging field of cardiology that uses genomic information to characterize disease risk and identify new therapeutic targets for drug discovery. Cardiovascular disease is responsible for approximately one-third of all deaths worldwide each year. While a majority of cardiovascular disease can be associated with lifestyle factors such as tobacco consumption, diet, and level of physical activity, risk genes can influence the predisposition to cardiovascular disease, age of onset, and severity.

“We are excited to broaden our collaboration with the Broad Institute to the area of cardiovascular genomics to discover genes and mutational changes underlying cardiovascular disorders in order to develop new therapies and diagnostic options for these diseases,” said Prof. Andreas Busch, Head of Global Drug Discovery and member of the Executive Committee of Bayer HealthCare. “We have been collaborating already for the last two years and have developed a very constructive partnership during this time.”

As part of this strategic alliance, Broad Institute and Bayer HealthCare will collaborate on genetic discovery, target validation, and drug discovery activities. Governance for this alliance will be comprised of a joint steering committee and joint research committee that will oversee research progress and direction. Financial terms of the agreement were not disclosed.

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About the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard was launched in 2004 to empower this generation of creative scientists to transform medicine. The Broad Institute seeks to describe all the molecular components of life and their connections; discover the molecular basis of major human diseases; develop effective new approaches to diagnostics and therapeutics; and disseminate discoveries, tools, methods and data openly to the entire scientific community.

Founded by MIT, Harvard and its affiliated hospitals, and the visionary Los Angeles philanthropists Eli and Edythe L. Broad, the Broad Institute includes faculty, professional staff and students from throughout the MIT and Harvard biomedical research communities and beyond, with collaborations spanning over a hundred private and public institutions in more than 40 countries worldwide. For further information about the Broad Institute, go to broadinstitute.org.

About Cardiology at Bayer

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Broad, Bayer expand partnership to develop therapies for cardiovascular disease

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PRESS RELEASE: Second Genome and Evotec to collaborate in microbiome discovery and development

Posted: March 13, 2015 at 3:48 pm

PRESS RELEASE: Second Genome and Evotec to collaborate in microbiome discovery and development

DGAP-News: Evotec AG / Key word(s): Miscellaneous Second Genome and Evotec to collaborate in microbiome discovery and development

2015-03-13 / 07:31

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Hamburg, Germany – 13 March 2015: Evotec AG (Frankfurt Stock Exchange: EVT, TecDAX, ISIN: DE0005664809) and Second Genome, Inc. today announced a collaboration in small molecule-based discovery and development activities for the treatment of microbiome-mediated diseases. The collaboration comprises the identification and optimisation of novel compounds as well as licence agreements for already existing assets developed by Evotec. Second Genome’s unique approach to identify and modulate microbiome-mediated pathways will be further enhanced by the use and the results of Evotec’s integrated drug discovery platform.

As part of the collaboration, Second Genome and Evotec will work together to screen microbiome-mediated targets of interest identified by the Second Genome microbiome discovery platform with Evotec’s technology platform, chemical libraries and other pre-clinical capabilities. The agreement between Evotec and Second Genome triggers an undisclosed upfront payment. Evotec is also eligible for pre-clinical, clinical and regulatory milestones as well as royalty payments related to commercialisation.

Dr Cord Dohrmann, Chief Scientific Officer of Evotec, commented: “We are pleased to contribute to Second Genome’s unique approach to treat microbiome-mediated diseases in the body with a particular emphasis on the gut. The enrichment and maturation of Second Genome’s project portfolio through our contributions will enhance the Company’s clinical pipeline in the near future.”

Mohan Iyer, Chief Business Officer of Second Genome, added: “The partnership with Evotec allows us efficiently to translate our unique microbiome discovery platform efficiently into tangible drug molecules for clinical development. Our enriched pipeline offers new treatment approaches for patients across a wide range of diseases with an initial focus on inflammatory conditions. We look forward to a sustained partnership with Evotec.”

Further financial terms were not disclosed.

ABOUT EVOTEC AG Evotec is a drug discovery alliance and development partnership company focused on rapidly progressing innovative product approaches with leading pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, academics, patient advocacy groups and venture capitalists. We operate worldwide providing the highest quality stand-alone and integrated drug discovery solutions, covering all activities from target-to-clinic. The Company has established a unique position by assembling top-class scientific experts and integrating state-of-the-art technologies as well as substantial experience and expertise in key therapeutic areas including neuroscience, pain, metabolic diseases as well as oncology, inflammation and infectious diseases. Evotec has long-term discovery alliances with partners including Bayer, Boehringer Ingelheim, CHDI, Genentech, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, MedImmune/AstraZeneca, Roche and UCB. In addition, the Company has existing development partnerships and product candidates both in clinical and pre-clinical development. These include partnerships with Boehringer Ingelheim and MedImmune in the field of diabetes, with Janssen Pharmaceuticals in the field of depression and with Roche in the field of Alzheimer’s disease. For additional information please go to http://www.evotec.com.

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PRESS RELEASE: Second Genome and Evotec to collaborate in microbiome discovery and development

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Cancer centers facing new challenges, NM doctor says

Posted: March 5, 2015 at 8:43 pm

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Cancer medicine is entering a new era, using drugs that target specific mutations identified by gene sequencing of cancerous tumors.

WILLMAN: A different way of delivering medicine

The new techniques pose special challenges for cancer centers in small states like New Mexico, where patient numbers are small, said Dr. Cheryl Willman, director and CEO of the University of New Mexico Cancer Center.

The real challenge for our patients is, how do you get your hands on those drugs, because you are going to need a whole cabinet of targeted agents, Willman said.

Part of the answer involves collaborating with other institutions to pool the genetic data from large numbers of patients, she said.

UNM Cancer Center announced recently that it has joined a research collaboration with five other U.S. cancer centers to pool genetic data of cancerous tumors and more quickly match patients to targeted treatments and drug trials.

For New Mexico, the collaboration is expected to help attract partnerships with drug companies that require large numbers of cancer patients to validate the results of drug trials, Willman said.

Cancer medicine is going through a huge transformation, which is to do comprehensive sequencing of each patients tumor, identify the mutations that are present, then pick the drug that really is targeting those mutations, she said.

UNM Cancer Center also plans this year to begin a nationwide study of leukemia patients. UNM will genetically sequence cancerous tumors for each of some 4,000 U.S. patients diagnosed with the blood cancer each year in search of mutations that can be targeted for drug therapies, Willman said.

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Cancer centers facing new challenges, NM doctor says

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Building Tailor-Made DNA Nanotubes Step by Step

Posted: February 23, 2015 at 10:44 pm

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Newswise Researchers at McGill University have developed a new, low-cost method to build DNA nanotubes block by block a breakthrough that could help pave the way for scaffolds made from DNA strands to be used in applications such as optical and electronic devices or smart drug-delivery systems.

Many researchers, including the McGill team, have previously constructed nanotubes using a method that relies on spontaneous assembly of DNA in solution. The new technique, reported today in Nature Chemistry, promises to yield fewer structural flaws than the spontaneous-assembly method. The building-block approach also makes it possible to better control the size and patterns of the DNA structures, the scientists report.

Just like a Tetris game, where we manipulate the game pieces with the aim of creating a horizontal line of several blocks, we can now build long nanotubes block by block, said Amani Hariri, a PhD student in McGills Department of Chemistry and lead author of the study. By using a fluorescence microscope we can further visualize the formation of the tubes at each stage of assembly, as each block is tagged with a fluorescent compound that serves as a beacon. We can then count the number of blocks incorporated in each tube as it is constructed.

This new technique was made possible by the development in recent years of single-molecule microscopy, which enables scientists to peer into the nano-world by turning the fluorescence of individual molecules on and off. (That groundbreaking work won three U.S.- and German-based scientists the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.)

Hariris research is jointly supervised by chemistry professors Gonzalo Cosa and Hanadi Sleiman, who co-authored the new study. Cosas research group specializes in single-molecule fluorescence techniques, while Sleimans uses DNA chemistry to design new materials for drug delivery and diagnostic tools.

The custom-built assembly technique developed through this collaboration gives us the ability to monitor the nanotubes as were building them, and see their structure, robustness and morphology, Cosa said.

We wanted to control the nanotubes lengths and features one-by-one, said Sleiman, who holds the Canada Research Chair in DNA Nanoscience. The resulting designer nanotubes, she adds, promise to be far cheaper to produce on a large scale than those created with so-called DNA origami, another innovative technique for using DNA as a nanoscale construction material.

Funding for the research was provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the Canada Foundation for Innovation, NanoQubec, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Fonds de recherch du Qubec Nature et technologies. —————————————————————————-

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Building Tailor-Made DNA Nanotubes Step by Step

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See the Big Picture With 'The Orbital Perspective': Review

Posted: February 10, 2015 at 11:46 am

If youre anything like me, you get a lot of your news online through various news and social media sources (especially Discovery News!). This is great, as it puts the mostup-to-date information in front of you instantly. But sometimes its nice to sit down and open up a real live book toexplorea topic much more intimately than you normally could online.

PHOTOS: An Awe-Inspiring Space Station Odyssey

As a member of the Orbital Perspective Release Crew,I recently had the opportunity to do precisely that with a free copy of Ron Garans book The Orbital Perspective: Lessons in Seeing the Big Picture from a Journey of 71 Million Miles.

Adecorated fighter pilot, astronaut, and entrepreneur, Ron has logged 178 days in space and over 71 million miles in orbit. He is the founder of the nonprofit social enterprise incubator Manna Energy Foundation and is also the founder of Fragile Oasis,which usesthe orbital perspective to inspire positive social and environmental action. During his time living and working in space over the course of two missions shuttle mission STS-124 and Expedition 27/28 aboard the ISS as well as participating in various humanitarian programs on Earth, Ron has developed a sense of acute awareness of the interconnectiveness of humanity, of how we really are all in this together. Unfortunately, regardless of how beautiful our planet looks from orbit theres no denying that actual living conditions in many places around the world are belied by that beauty.

ANALYSIS: Ron Garan: I Hope the Heat Shield and Parachutes Work

Having seen our world firsthand from both viewpoints, Ron has becomeaware of the paradox but doesnt believe that it has to be just the way things are he believes we have the ability to change things on a global scale but only if we work together only if we canachieve an orbital perspective.

This is not your typical space book. The Orbital Perspectivewont make you gasp in wonder at how the continents look from low-Earthorbitor dazzle you with glossy photographs of stars, aurorae, the Milky Way or massive spacecraft roaring into the sky. Thats not what its about. Yes, Ron has seen and been a part of all that, and yes, he does provide fascinating insight into the space program particularlythe collaboration between the U.S. and Russia to develop and construct the ISS. But The Orbital Perspective is much more about the effort itself than it is about Station or the Shuttle or what Earth looks like as it turns tirelessly below.

Collaboration in the literalsense of the word, laboringtogether is what Ron focuses on above all else because it is only through true collaborationthat amazing and world-changing things can be achieved.

PHOTO: Garan photographs a meteor from orbit

The Orbital Perspective is a book for anyone who works with people (which is almost everyone who is employed) and especially those who find themselves in roles that require bringing people together to solve a problem, whether within their own organization or halfway around the world. Working in space and working on Earth are surprisingly similar (besides that pesky gravity bit) if just in that both require individuals with specialized skill sets cooperatingtogether to achieve a common goal. Ron has been one of those individuals many times, and its a privilege to gain some of his personal insight.

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See the Big Picture With 'The Orbital Perspective': Review

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Biogen Idec and Columbia Medical Center to conduct collaborative genetics research

Posted: January 9, 2015 at 9:49 pm

Sequencing facility and shared postdoctoral program to support genetic discovery research to advance development of new treatments

CAMBRIDGE, MA, and NEW YORK, NY (January 9, 2015) — Biogen Idec (NASDAQ: BIIB) and Columbia University Medical Center have formed a $30 million strategic alliance to conduct genetics discovery research on the underlying causes of disease and to identify new treatment approaches. As part of this agreement, a sequencing and analysis facility and shared postdoctoral program will be established at Columbia to support collaborative genetics studies. The agreement will integrate genomics research conducted at Columbia with Biogen Idec’s understanding of disease mechanisms and pathways, and expertise in discovering new medicines.

“Our understanding of human genetics is rapidly expanding, and there is growing recognition that the elucidation of the genetic causes of disease will have a transformative effect on both patient care and drug development in many different diseases,” said David Goldstein, PhD, founding director of Columbia University’s Institute for Genomic Medicine. “This collaboration marries the exceptional drug development expertise of Biogen with cutting-edge genomics expertise at Columbia University Medical Center. It will not only focus on target identification and validation at the early stages of drug development, but also facilitate genetically informed evaluation of treatments.”

“Human genetic technologies and analytics have advanced to the point where they are becoming central to the discovery and development of new medicines,” said Tim Harris, PhD, DSc, Senior Vice President, Technology and Translational Sciences, Biogen Idec. “We are committed to working with leading institutions such as Columbia to advance basic genetic research and, by combining our unique strengths, accelerating the discovery of potential new treatments.”

The collaboration will enable Biogen Idec and Columbia to investigate the genomes of patients showing unusual treatment responses or unique disease presentations and to explore the connections among genes, pathways, and disease processes. The ultimate goal will be to provide multiple qualified targets for new therapeutic approaches, increasing the potential for the development of new treatments.

“This collaboration with Biogen, with its focus on the genetic causes of diseases, fits in perfectly with Columbia’s commitment to precision medicine,” said Lee Goldman, MD, MPH, Harold and Margaret Hatch Professor of the University and dean of the faculties of health sciences and medicine. “The development of new treatments based on this genetic understanding will have profound effects on clinical practice.”

The new facility will have broad genetic research capabilities and the capacity to launch and complete whole-genome sequencing projects rapidly. It will allow for rapid population-scale DNA sequencing across a broad range of disease areas, focusing on diseases with significant unmet clinical need such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

Tom Maniatis, PhD, the Isidore S. Edelman Professor of Biochemistry and chair of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics at Columbia University Medical Center and director of Columbia’s university-wide precision medicine initiative, said, “The strong clinical and basic science programs in neurodegenerative diseases at Columbia will significantly benefit from the Columbia/Biogen alliance. We expect that the alliance will dramatically advance our understanding of the genetics of these devastating diseases and ultimately lead to mechanism-based treatments, a key aspect of Columbia’s precision-medicine initiative.”

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About Biogen Idec

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