Tag Archives: controversial

Obama moves to split cyberwarfare command from the NSA

Posted: December 29, 2016 at 3:48 am

With weeks to go in his tenure, President Obama on Friday moved to end the controversial dual-hat arrangement under which the National Security Agency and the nations cyberwarfare command are headed by the same military officer.

It is unclear whether President-elect Donald Trump will support such a move. A transition official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss the next administrations plans, said only that cybersecurity has been and will be a central focus of the transition effort.

Pressure had grown on Obama to make such a move on the grounds that the two jobs are too large for one person to handle, that the two organizations have fundamentally different missions and that U.S. Cyber Command, or Cybercom, needed its own leader to become a full-fledged fighting force.

[Obama to be urged to split cyberwar command from NSA

While the dual-hat arrangement was once appropriate in order to enable a fledgling Cybercom to leverage NSAs advanced capabilities and expertise, Cybercom has since matured to the point where it needs its own leader, Obama said in a statement accompanying his signing of the 2017 defense authorization bill.

Cybercoms mission is, when ordered, to disrupt and destroy adversaries networks. It is also to defend the nation against incoming threats to critical systems and to protect the militarys computers from cyberattack.

The NSA also has a defensive mission to protect the governments classified networks but is better known for its role in conducting electronic spying on overseas targets to gather intelligence on adversaries and foreign governments.

Cybercom, established in 2009 inside the NSA headquarters at Fort Meade, Md., has long depended on the spy agencys capabilities. NSA and Cybercom personnel sit side by side and use the same networks that were built by the NSA.

The two organizations should have separate leaders who are able to devote themselves to each organizations respective mission and responsibilities, but should continue to leverage the shared capabilities and synergies developed under the dual-hat arrangement, Obama wrote.

Defense Secretary Ashton B. Carter and Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. earlier recommended to Obama that the two organizations have separate heads.

Obama had been on the verge of ending the dual-hat leadership in late 2013 but was persuaded to hold off when senior officials, including the NSAs director at the time, Army Gen. Keith B. Alexander, argued that the two agencies needed one leader to ensure that the NSA did not withhold resources from Cybercom.

Others, including a presidential review commission, recommended that each of the two groups have its own leader and that the NSA director be a civilian. Since its inception in 1952, the NSA has been led by military officers.

The bill that Obama signed bars the splitting of the leadership role until the defense secretary and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff jointly certify that to do so would not diminish Cybercoms effectiveness.

Obama took a swipe at Congress for imposing that requirement on him.

The Congress … should not place unnecessary and bureaucratic administrative burdens and conditions on ending the dual-hat arrangement at a time when the speed and nature of cyber threats requires agility in making decisions about how best to organize and manage the nations cyber capabilities, he wrote.

Obama said that the Pentagon and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence have planned a phased transition during which the NSA can continue to provide vital operational support to Cybercom.

Original post:
Obama moves to split cyberwarfare command from the NSA

Posted in NSA | Comments Off on Obama moves to split cyberwarfare command from the NSA

Biomedical Research Issues in Genetics – Genome.gov

Posted: May 16, 2016 at 11:44 pm

Biomedical Research Issues in Genetics

In addition to analyzing the direct ethical, legal and social implications of the Human Genome Project (HGP), the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) funds examinations of issues that are related because they involve manipulation of human genetic material or information. These include such controversial topics as genetic engineering and enhancement, and eugenics. Other controversial but related issues – such as stem cell research and cloning – have not yet been examined by NHGRI.

What are the ethical and legal implications of using our advancing knowledge of genetics to, in effect, enhance human beings by replacing or repairing a gene or genes associated with increased risk of disease” Is enhancement ethical for certain sub-populations, such as the aging, but not for others” Can eugenics ” the so-called science of selectively breeding superior human beings with “better” genes ” ever be used ethically, or is the very concept inherently discriminatory” Will cloning be used to “improve” the genetic makeup of individuals or are the ethical considerations too divisive” What does stem cell research portend for the future of regenerative medicine”

NHGRI supports highly technical genetic research that is rapidly advancing our understanding of the human genome. This new information, although potentially beneficial to the health of Americans, can also be misused. NHGRI created the Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) Research Program in 1990 as an integral part of the HGP.

The insights gained through ELSI research inform the development of federal guidelines, regulations and legislation to safeguard against misuse of genetic information. Through the ELSI Research Program, NHGRI also supports a variety of ethics- and policy-related research studies, workshops and conferences to further explore and address such issues. Between 1990 and 2001, these ELSI-funded activities included some 235 research and education projects, more than 550 peer-reviewed journal articles, books, newsletters, Web sites and television and radio programs, as well as dozens of workshops, conferences and related activities focused on translating ELSI research into clinical and public health practices.

Top of page

Top of page

Top of page

Top of page

Top of page

Last Reviewed: March 7, 2012

More here:
Biomedical Research Issues in Genetics – Genome.gov

Posted in Human Genetics | Comments Off on Biomedical Research Issues in Genetics – Genome.gov

Controversial Change Law: Illegal To Discriminate Against Atheism Fox & Friends – Video

Posted: April 11, 2015 at 7:52 am



Controversial Change Law: Illegal To Discriminate Against Atheism Fox Friends
Monetized Social Media Platform Futunet Futurenet Promotional Film:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C47wCXELyKg Click Here For Free Register : http://sukrutopal.futurenet.club/ Controversial…

By: World Latest News

More:
Controversial Change Law: Illegal To Discriminate Against Atheism Fox & Friends – Video

Posted in Atheism | Comments Off on Controversial Change Law: Illegal To Discriminate Against Atheism Fox & Friends – Video

Why opponents of same-sex marriage are turning to GoFundMe

Posted: April 7, 2015 at 9:49 am

First pizza, now flowers.

A florist from Washington state, fined $1,000 in February for refusing to decorate a gay wedding in 2013 because she said doing so went against her Christian beliefs, has made more than $100,000 through an online crowdfunding site.

The response echoes the more than$840,000 raised for an Indiana pizzeria whose owners said they would not, as a Christian business, provide their services for a same-sex wedding.

Such donations highlight one way that supporters of the controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) are anonymously expressing their views in a discussion that has been dominated by opponents of the law. The recent passage of the RFRA in Indiana (and Arkansas) has drawn a stark line nationwide between advocates of religious freedoms and those of anti-discrimination leading some critics to say that those whose opinions are based on religious faith are now themselves facing intolerance.

About a week ago, Memories Pizza in Walkerton, Ind., became the first business to publicly stand in support of the RFRA. Less than a day after their interview with WBND-TV aired, co-owners Kevin OConnor and his daughter Crystal found themselves facing social media outrage, a hacked website, and threats to their family and business.

I dont know if we will re-open, or if we can, if its safe to re-open, Ms. OConnor told Dana Loesch on The Blaze TV soon after the incident. Were in hiding basically, staying in the house.

In response to the outrage against Memories Pizza, Ms. Loesch and The Blaze contributor Lawrence B. Jones III set up a GoFundMe page for the OConnors, where they criticized the reaction against the pizzeria owners.

Rather than allowing this family to simply have their opinion, which they were asked to give, outraged people grabbed the torches and began a campaign to destroy this small business in small town Indiana, they wrote.

More than $200,000 from more than 7,000 donors poured in within 24 hours of the page going live. Later that week, another GoFundMe page, set up in February for Washington florist Baronnelle Stutzman,received a similar show of support, The Seattle Times reported.

The amounts that each initiative received reflect a quiet push back by supporters of the RFRA, some of whomsee the issue not as one of discrimination, but of freedom of choice or freedom of speech.

Excerpt from:
Why opponents of same-sex marriage are turning to GoFundMe

Posted in Freedom of Speech | Comments Off on Why opponents of same-sex marriage are turning to GoFundMe

Why opponents of same-sex marriage are donating to GoFundMe (+video)

Posted: at 9:49 am

First pizza, now flowers.

A florist from Washington state, fined $1,000 in February for refusing to decorate a gay wedding in 2013 because she said doing so went against her Christian beliefs, has made more than $100,000 through an online crowdfunding site.

The response echoes the more than$840,000 raised for an Indiana pizzeria whose owners said they would not, as a Christian business, provide their services for a same-sex wedding.

Such donations highlight one way that supporters of the controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) are anonymously expressing their views in a discussion that has been dominated by opponents of the law. The recent passage of the RFRA in Indiana (and Arkansas) has drawn a stark line nationwide between advocates of religious freedoms and those of anti-discrimination leading some critics to say that those whose opinions are based on religious faith are now themselves facing intolerance.

About a week ago, Memories Pizza in Walkerton, Ind., became the first business to publicly stand in support of the RFRA. Less than a day after their interview with WBND-TV aired, co-owners Kevin OConnor and his daughter Crystal found themselves facing social media outrage, a hacked website, and threats to their family and business.

I dont know if we will re-open, or if we can, if its safe to re-open, Ms. OConnor told Dana Loesch on The Blaze TV soon after the incident. Were in hiding basically, staying in the house.

In response to the outrage against Memories Pizza, Ms. Loesch and The Blaze contributor Lawrence B. Jones III set up a GoFundMe page for the OConnors, where they criticized the reaction against the pizzeria owners.

Rather than allowing this family to simply have their opinion, which they were asked to give, outraged people grabbed the torches and began a campaign to destroy this small business in small town Indiana, they wrote.

More than $200,000 from more than 7,000 donors poured in within 24 hours of the page going live. Later that week, another GoFundMe page, set up in February for Washington florist Baronnelle Stutzman,received a similar show of support, The Seattle Times reported.

The amounts that each initiative received reflect a quiet push back by supporters of the RFRA, some of whomsee the issue not as one of discrimination, but of freedom of choice or freedom of speech.

See the original post here:
Why opponents of same-sex marriage are donating to GoFundMe (+video)

Posted in Freedom of Speech | Comments Off on Why opponents of same-sex marriage are donating to GoFundMe (+video)

Why opponents of same-sex marriage are turning to GoFundMe (+video)

Posted: at 9:49 am

First pizza, now flowers.

A florist from Washington state, fined $1,000 in February for refusing to decorate a gay wedding in 2013 because she said doing so went against her Christian beliefs, has made more than $100,000 through an online crowdfunding site.

The response echoes the more than$840,000 raised for an Indiana pizzeria whose owners said they would not, as a Christian business, provide their services for a same-sex wedding.

Such donations highlight one way that supporters of the controversial Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) are anonymously expressing their views in a discussion that has been dominated by opponents of the law. The recent passage of the RFRA in Indiana (and Arkansas) has drawn a stark line nationwide between advocates of religious freedoms and those of anti-discrimination leading some critics to say that those whose opinions are based on religious faith are now themselves facing intolerance.

About a week ago, Memories Pizza in Walkerton, Ind., became the first business to publicly stand in support of the RFRA. Less than a day after their interview with WBND-TV aired, co-owners Kevin OConnor and his daughter Crystal found themselves facing social media outrage, a hacked website, and threats to their family and business.

I dont know if we will re-open, or if we can, if its safe to re-open, Ms. OConnor told Dana Loesch on The Blaze TV soon after the incident. Were in hiding basically, staying in the house.

In response to the outrage against Memories Pizza, Ms. Loesch and The Blaze contributor Lawrence B. Jones III set up a GoFundMe page for the OConnors, where they criticized the reaction against the pizzeria owners.

Rather than allowing this family to simply have their opinion, which they were asked to give, outraged people grabbed the torches and began a campaign to destroy this small business in small town Indiana, they wrote.

More than $200,000 from more than 7,000 donors poured in within 24 hours of the page going live. Later that week, another GoFundMe page, set up in February for Washington florist Baronnelle Stutzman,received a similar show of support, The Seattle Times reported.

The amounts that each initiative received reflect a quiet push back by supporters of the RFRA, some of whomsee the issue not as one of discrimination, but of freedom of choice or freedom of speech.

Original post:
Why opponents of same-sex marriage are turning to GoFundMe (+video)

Posted in Freedom of Speech | Comments Off on Why opponents of same-sex marriage are turning to GoFundMe (+video)

Insiders view Paul as strong early state contender

Posted: April 4, 2015 at 4:41 am

On the eve of his expected presidential announcement, Republican insiders in Iowa and New Hampshire say Rand Paul is a top contender in those early states next year and they agree that for better and for worse, his father, Ron Paul, looms large over his candidacy.

According to this weeks survey of the POLITICO Caucus, a bipartisan group of political operatives, activists and key players from Iowa and New Hampshire, about two-thirds of all respondents said Paul can win their state in the caucuses or primary. But to do so, many said, the Kentucky senator has to build on the base cultivated by his father, the libertarian icon and former presidential candidate.

Story Continued Below

While former Rep. Ron Pauls network of supporters is proving to be an asset, the elder Pauls isolationist views which many associate with Rand Paul are also contributing to what is by far the senators biggest liability: his positions on foreign policy and national security. A majority of respondents, when asked an open-ended question about Pauls greatest weakness, pointed to one or the other.

Sixty-three percent of all respondents said they consider Rand Paul an isolationist, and only 16 percent think he could beat Hillary Clinton in a general election a number that ticks up to 24 percent among Republican insiders.

He needs to distance himself from some of his fathers positions, said one nonpartisan insider. In particular, that means foreign policy. It seems foreign policy/international relations issues may be more important than usual this cycle, so its even more important that he finds a position acceptable to a broader group of GOP voters. The problem with doing so is that moving away from his fathers positions carries the risk of alienating the libertarian voters who are his base.

Rand Paul, who is expected to announce his presidential candidacy next Tuesday in Louisville, has long bristled at attempts to link his views too closely with those of his father, a former GOP Texas congressman who continues to weigh in with his controversial views on foreign policy. The senator, while less interventionist in orientation than many of his likely competitors, has stressed that he believes in a strong national defense and has made a concerted effort to reassure activists and donors leery of his father that he is sufficiently supportive of Israel.

At the outset of the 2016 race, Ron Paul is viewed as providing an edge to his son. Fifty-seven percent of all respondents called the elder Paul a net positive, pointing to the built-in base of libertarian support in Iowa and New Hampshire, left over from his 2008 and 2012 presidential bids, that Rand Paul can tap into.

With a huge field of candidates, Rand Paul has one advantage most other candidates dont enjoy, he essentially owns one segment of the caucus electorate, said one unaffiliated Iowa Republican, who, like all POLITICO Caucus members, was granted anonymity to speak freely. If Paul can turn out the 26,000-plus people who voted for his father in 2012, I like his chances in this current field of candidates.

One New Hampshire Republican who is backing Jeb Bush added, Rand needs to hold the Ron Paul base, pick up some establishment support, and hope that the other candidates divide up the rest of the vote. Its a tough path, but not out of the question.

Visit link:
Insiders view Paul as strong early state contender

Posted in Ron Paul | Comments Off on Insiders view Paul as strong early state contender

Indian Supreme Court Strikes Down Controversial Censorship Law – Video

Posted: March 31, 2015 at 10:43 pm



Indian Supreme Court Strikes Down Controversial Censorship Law
On March 24th, India's highest court overturned Section 66A of the 2009 Information Technology Act, which criminalized 'offensive' material posted online.

By: NewsBeat Social

Excerpt from:
Indian Supreme Court Strikes Down Controversial Censorship Law – Video

Posted in Censorship | Comments Off on Indian Supreme Court Strikes Down Controversial Censorship Law – Video

Supreme Court strikes down controversial Section 66 (A) | Freedom of Speech restored – Video

Posted: March 27, 2015 at 12:51 pm



Supreme Court strikes down controversial Section 66 (A) | Freedom of Speech restored
Supreme Court of India has struck down the controversial Section 66 (A), which powered police with the right to arrest individuals making derogatory comments on social media websites, thereby…

By: Mango News

Continue reading here:
Supreme Court strikes down controversial Section 66 (A) | Freedom of Speech restored – Video

Posted in Freedom of Speech | Comments Off on Supreme Court strikes down controversial Section 66 (A) | Freedom of Speech restored – Video

Section 66A of IT Act: Timeline

Posted: March 24, 2015 at 5:52 am

NEW DELHI: In a landmark judgment upholding freedom of expression, the Supreme Court on Tuesday struck down a provision in the cyber law which provides power to arrest a person for posting allegedly “offensive” content on websites.

According to reports, the apex court ruled that the section falls outside Article 19(2), which relates to Freedom of Speech, and thus has to be struck down in its entirety.

Hailing the Supreme Court’s decision to strike down the controversial Section 66A of the IT Act, Shreya Singhal, one of the petitioners in the case, on Tuesday said that no one would fear expressing their opinions online anymore.

The first PIL on the issue was filed in 2012 by law student Shreya Singhal, who sought amendment in Section 66A of the Act, after two girls – Shaheen Dhada and Rinu Shrinivasan – were arrested in Palghar in Thane district as one of them posted a comment against the shutdown in Mumbai following Shiv Sena leader Bal Thackeray’s death and the other ‘liked’ it.

READ ALSO: All you need to know about Section 66A of IT Act

Centre defends Section 66A of IT Act

Sec 66A draconian, but is needed: Govt

Class 11 student sent to jail for Facebook post against UP minister Azam Khan

Blog: Repeal section 66A: Law that permits jailing school kid for Facebook post is objectionable and absurd

In the wake of numerous complaints of harassment and arrests, the apex court had on May 16, 2013, come out with an advisory that a person, accused of posting objectionable comments on social networking sites, cannot be arrested without police getting permission from senior officers like IG or DCP.

Read the original here:
Section 66A of IT Act: Timeline

Posted in Freedom of Speech | Comments Off on Section 66A of IT Act: Timeline