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Boosting A Natural Protection Against Alzheimer's Disease

Posted: March 12, 2015 at 7:43 pm

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Newswise Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a gene variant that may be used to predict people most likely to respond to an investigational therapy under development for Alzheimers disease (AD). The study, published March 12 in Cell Stem Cell, is based on experiments with cultured neurons derived from adult stem cells.

Our results suggest that certain gene variants allow us to reduce the amount of beta amyloid produced by neurons, said senior author Lawrence Goldstein, PhD, director of UC San Diego Sanford Stem Cell Clinical Center and UC San Diego Stem Cell Program. This is potentially significant for slowing the progression of Alzheimers disease. AD is the most common cause of dementia in the United States, afflicting one in nine people age 65 and older.

The genetic risk factor investigated are variants of the SORL1 gene. The gene codes for a protein that affects the processing and subsequent accumulation of beta amyloid peptides, small bits of sticky protein that build up in the spaces between neurons. These plaques are linked to neuronal death and related dementia.

Previous studies have shown that certain variants of the SORL1 gene confer some protection from AD, while other variants are associated with about a 30 percent higher likelihood of developing the disease. Approximately one-third of the U.S. adult population is believed to carry the non-protective gene variants.

The studys primary finding is that variants in the SORL1 gene may also be associated with how neurons respond to a natural compound in the brain that normally acts to protect nerve cell health. The protective compound, called BDNF, short for brain-derived neurotrophic factor, is currently being investigated as a potential therapy for a number of neurological diseases, including AD, because of its role in promoting neuronal survival.

For the study, UC San Diego researchers took skin cells from 13 people, seven of whom had AD and six of whom were healthy control subjects, and reprogrammed the skin cells into stem cells. These stem cells were coaxed to differentiate into neurons, and the neurons were cultured and then treated with BDNF.

The experiments revealed that neurons that carried disease-protective SORL1 variants responded to the therapy by reducing their baseline rate of beta amyloid peptide production by, on average, 20 percent. In contrast, the neurons carrying the risk variants of the gene, showed no change in baseline beta amyloid production.

BDNF is found in everyones brain, said first author Jessica Young, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow in the Goldstein laboratory. What we found is that if you add more BDNF to neurons that carry a genetic risk factor for the disease, the neurons dont respond. Those with the protective genetic profile do.

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Boosting A Natural Protection Against Alzheimer's Disease

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ATHEISM EXPOSED – GUERRILLA HEBREW – Video

Posted: March 4, 2015 at 9:52 pm



ATHEISM EXPOSED – GUERRILLA HEBREW
WarriorsOfWisdom EPISODE 1 EXODUS1715 AKA THE SECT OF THE SICARII http://WWW.EXODUS1715.INFO http://WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/EXODUS1715 SAN DIEGO HEBREW ISRAELITES THE END OF …

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ATHEISM EXPOSED – GUERRILLA HEBREW – Video

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Bitcoin over Bluetooth BLE at Rooted Kava Bar in San Diego – Video

Posted: December 26, 2014 at 3:47 pm



Bitcoin over Bluetooth BLE at Rooted Kava Bar in San Diego
Paid for some drinks using Bitcoin over Bluetooth (BLE) at Rooted Kava Bar in San Diego. So much smoother than using QR codes. Anyone with Airbitz on iPhone …

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Bitcoin over Bluetooth BLE at Rooted Kava Bar in San Diego – Video

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Morgan Rockwell: Bitcoin Kinetics/ Bitcoin Academy/ Cannacoin – Video

Posted: September 2, 2014 at 10:45 pm



Morgan Rockwell: Bitcoin Kinetics/ Bitcoin Academy/ Cannacoin
While traveling in May Derrick went to San Diego to work with Bitcoin Kinetics CEO Morgan Rockwell. Find more videos like this at: http://www.theconsciousresistance.com.

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Morgan Rockwell: Bitcoin Kinetics/ Bitcoin Academy/ Cannacoin – Video

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Scientists sequence complete genome of E. coli strain responsible for food poisoning

Posted: September 1, 2014 at 4:43 pm

9 hours ago by Catherine Hockmuth UC San Diego bioengineers have completed the genome sequencing of a particularly harmful strain of E. coli that has been tied to outbreaks of food poisoning. The circular map shows the completed sequence with lighter color regions representing gaps in a 2001 sequencing of the strain that have now been completed with current technology. Credit: The Systems Biology Research Group at UC San Diego.

(Phys.org) Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have produced the first complete genome sequencing of a strain of E. coli that is a common cause of outbreaks of food poisoning in the United States. Although the E. coli strain EDL933 was first isolated in the 1980s, it gained national attention in 1993 when it was linked to an outbreak of food poisoning from Jack-in-the-Box restaurants in the western United States.

Their paper published online Aug. 14 in the journal Genome Announcements reports the full, complete sequence with no gaps. Their analysis includes so-called jumping genes that can move around the same genome, sometimes causing damage to individual genes or enabling antibiotic resistance.

“With a complete genome sequence, we can now pinpoint the precise location of all such elements, which might help to track and treat future outbreaks,” said Ramy Aziz, the senior author on the paper. Aziz led the research as a visiting scientist working in Bernhard Palsson’s Systems Biology Research Group at UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering. Aziz is also a professor at Cairo University in Egypt.

The genome sequence for this historical strain was first published in 2001, but there were many gaps in the genome that could not be closed with the sequencing technology available to scientists in 2001. Given the importance of this strain as a major cause of food poisoning, Palsson’s Systems Biology Research Group recently sequenced its genome using a combination of sequencing data from instruments made by Pacific Biosciences and Illumina.

“New sequencing and assembly methods are enabling a full expose of pesky pathogens; there is no place to hide genetic characteristics anymore. The full genetic delineation of multiple pathogenic strains is likely to not only improve our understanding of their characteristics, but to find and exploit their vulnerabilities, said Palsson, the Galletti Professor of Bioengineering at UC San Diego.

Explore further: New models predict where E. coli strains will thrive

More information: Paper: genomea.asm.org/content/2/4/e00821-14.full.pdf

Bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego have used the genomic sequences of 55 E. coli strains to reconstruct the metabolic repertoire for each strain. Surprisingly, these reconstructions do an excellent job of …

(Phys.org) Bioengineers at the Jacobs School have created a better way to sequence genomes from individual cells. The breakthrough, which relies on microwells just 12 nanoliters in volume (see image), …

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Scientists sequence complete genome of E. coli strain responsible for food poisoning

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San Diego Scientists Add Two Letters To DNA Alphabet – Video

Posted: May 11, 2014 at 8:44 am



San Diego Scientists Add Two Letters To DNA Alphabet
Scripps researchers have taken DNA's four familiar building blocks A, T, C and G and added two new ones: X and Y.

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Genetica elemental 1: estructura DNA – Video

Posted: April 23, 2014 at 10:44 am



Genetica elemental 1: estructura DNA

By: Pablo Cuesta de Diego

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Genetica elemental 1: estructura DNA – Video

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Researchers Develop Bacterial FM Radio

Posted: April 11, 2014 at 6:44 am

April 10, 2014

Image Caption: Independent genetic circuits are linked within single cells, illustrated under the magnifying glass, then coupled via quorum sensing at the colony level. Credit: Arthur Prindle, UC San Diego

By Kim McDonald, UC San Diego

Programming living cells offers the prospect of harnessing sophisticated biological machinery for transformative applications in energy, agriculture, water remediation and medicine. Inspired by engineering, researchers in the emerging field of synthetic biology have designed a tool box of small genetic components that act as intracellular switches, logic gates, counters and oscillators.

But scientists have found it difficult to wire the components together to form larger circuits that can function as genetic programs. One of the biggest obstacles? Dealing with a small number of available wires.

A team of biologists and engineers at UC San Diego has taken a large step toward overcoming this obstacle. Their advance, detailed in a paper which appears in this weeks advance online publication of the journal Nature, describes their development of a rapid and tunable post-translational coupling for genetic circuits. This advance builds on their development of biopixel sensor arrays reported in Nature by the same group of scientists two years ago.

The problem the researchers solved arises from the noisy cellular environment that tends to lead to highly variable circuit performance. The components of a cell are intermixed, crowded and constantly bumping into each other. This makes it difficult to reuse parts in different parts of a program, limiting the total number of available parts and wires. These difficulties hindered the creation of genetic programs that can read the cellular environment and react with the execution of a sequence of instructions.

The teams breakthrough involves a form of frequency multiplexing inspired by FM radio.

This circuit lets us encode multiple independent environmental inputs into a single time series, said Arthur Prindle, a bioengineering graduate student at UC San Diego and the first author of the study. Multiple pieces of information are transferred using the same part. It works by using distinct frequencies to transmit different signals on a common channel.

The key that enabled this breakthrough is the use of frequency, rather than amplitude, to convey information. Combining two biological signals using amplitude is difficult because measurements of amplitude involve fluorescence and are usually relative. Its not easy to separate out the contribution of each signal, said Prindle. When we use frequency, these relative measurements are made with respect to time, and can be readily extracted by measuring the time between peaks using any one of several analytical methods.

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Researchers Develop Bacterial FM Radio

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Highlights: Eugenia Naro-Maciel, CUNY SI — DNA Barcoding Freshwater Communities at Former Landfill – Video

Posted: at 6:44 am



Highlights: Eugenia Naro-Maciel, CUNY SI — DNA Barcoding Freshwater Communities at Former Landfill
These clips are highlights taken from some iPlant session presentations at the International Plant and Animal Genome Meeting XXIII (January 2014,San Diego). …

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Highlights: Eugenia Naro-Maciel, CUNY SI — DNA Barcoding Freshwater Communities at Former Landfill – Video

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Highlights: John Duvick, Iowa State – xGDBvm Genome Annotation in the Cloud – Video

Posted: April 10, 2014 at 3:50 am



Highlights: John Duvick, Iowa State – xGDBvm Genome Annotation in the Cloud
These clips are taken from some of the presentations at the International Plant and Animal Genome Meeting XXIII, held in January 2014, in San Diego. iPlant u…

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