Tag Archives: search-engine

JPL Robotics: Home Page

Posted: September 8, 2016 at 6:40 am

Richard Volpe, Manager Gabriel Udomkesmalee, Deputy Manager Welcome to the JPL Robotics website! Here you’ll find detailed descriptions of the activities of the Mobility and Robotic Systems Section, as well as related robotics efforts around the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. We are approximately 100 engineers working on all aspects of robotics for space exploration and related terrestrial applications. We write autonomy software that drives rovers on Mars, and operations software to monitor and control them from Earth. We do the same for their instrument-placement and sampling arms, and are developing new systems with many limbs for walking and climbing. To achieve mobility off the surface, we are creating prototypes of airships which would fly through the atmospheres of Titan and Venus, and drills and probes which could go underground on Mars and Europa.

To enable all of these robots to interact with their surroundings, we make them see with cameras and measure their environments with other sensors. Based on these measurements, the robots control themselves with algorithms also developed by our research teams. We capture the control-and-sensor-processing software in unifying frameworks, which enable reuse and transfer among our projects. In the course of developing this technology, we build real end-to-end systems as well as high-fidelity simulations of how the robots would work on worlds we are planning to visit.

Please use the menu at left to navigate to the view of our work that is most important to you. Our application domains are described in general terms, and then specifically in the context of flight projects and research tasks. Personnel are described in terms of the groups that constitute the section, as well as the people who constitute the groups. Most of our major robot systems are described, as are the laboratory facilities in which they are developed and exercised. For more detailed information, our publications may be accessed through a search engine, or more recent news may be browsed. Finally, to provide context to our current work, our charter is documented, the history of JPL robotics is described, and links to other related work are provided.

Read the original post:

JPL Robotics: Home Page

Posted in Robotics | Comments Off on JPL Robotics: Home Page

The NSA – The Super Secret National Security Agency

Posted: May 7, 2016 at 3:47 am

– A Tale of Two Countries – New Zealand Apologizes for Illegal Domestic Spying, While U.S. Still Refuses to Acknowledge NSAs…

– Attacking Tor – How the NSA Targets Users’ Online Anonymity

– Citizens Against Unidentified Flying Objects Secrecy v. National Security Agency

– Clapper Reveals Bush-Era Docs Showing NSA Spying Dragnet Started 2001

– Covert Operations of the U.S. National Security Agency

– Creation of The NSA – from ‘The Secret Government – Origin, Identity and Purpose of MJ-12’

– DARPA – Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency – Main File

– Did the NSA Kill Hugo Chavez?

– Exposed The Covert, Real-Time Spying on Youtube, Facebook and Blogs

– Foiling Computer Hackers Top Priority With FBI, CIA, Pentagon, NSA

– ‘Follow the Money’ – NSA Spies on International Payments

– Foreign Officials in the Dark About their Own Spy Agencies’ Cooperation with NSA

– Google and The NSA Connection

– Google and The NSA – Whos Holding The ‘Shit-Bag’ Now?

– Google Asks NSA to Help Secure Its Network

– Google, CIA and the NSA – Inside the Secret Network behind Mass Surveillance, Endless War and Skynet

– Google to Enlist NSA to Help It Ward Off Cyber-Attacks

– Hidden Government Scanners Will Instantly Know Everything About You from 164 Feet Away

– High-Level U.S. Government Officials Have Warned for 40 Years that Mass Surveillance Would Lead to Tyranny…

– How Google, Facebook, Skype, Yahoo and AOL are All Blatantly Lying to Their Own Users in Denying NSA Spy Grid…

– How International Treaties Gave NSA Back-Door Access for Surveillance

– How NSA Access Was Built into Windows

– How the NSA Plans to Infect ‘Millions’ of Computers with Malware

– How the NSA Spies on Your Google and Yahoo Accounts

– Inside TAO – Documents Reveal Top NSA Hacking Unit

– Inside The NSAs Largest and Most Expansive Secret Domestic Spy Center in Bluffdale, Utah – Exposed

– It’s Not Just Spying – How the NSA Has Turned Into a Giant Profit Center for Corrupt Insiders

– Key to The Extraterrestrial Messages – NSA Technical Journal Vol XIV No 1

– La NSA Particip en El Desarrollo de Windows 7

– La Red Echelon – Main File

– Lawless NSA Global Spying

-Mat la NSA a Hugo Chvez?

– NSA Able to Target Offline Computers Using Radio-Waves for Surveillance, Cyber-Attacks

– NSA Boss Wants More Control Over The Internet

– NSA Built Back Door in All Windows Software by 1999

– NSA Claims Massive New Surveillance Powers

– NSA Director Defends Plan to Maintain ‘Backdoors’ Into Technology Companies

– NSA Gathers Data on Social Connections of U.S. Citizens

– NSA, GCHQ Using Data from ‘Leaky’ Smartphone Apps to Spy

– NSA has Built its Own, Secret, Warrantless, Shadow Social Network, and You’ve Already Joined It

– NSA Helped With Windows 7 Development – Privacy Expert Voices ‘Backdoor’ Concerns – Security Researchers Dismiss Idea

– NSA ‘Helping’ Microsoft With Windows 7 ‘Security’

– NSA Infiltrates Links to Yahoo and Google Data Centers Worldwide – Snowden Documents Say

– NSA – National Security Agency – Extrapolate Postmodum Prosum – Updated

– NSA Offering ‘Billions’ for Skype Eavesdrop Solution – Business Model for P2P Firm at Last?

– NSA Recent UFO Document Release More Interesting for What It “Could” Not Find

– NSA Refuses to Declassify Obamas Cybersecurity Directive – Exceptionally Grave Damage

– NSAs Computer and Mobile Spying – An Interview with Professor Tung Yin

– NSA’s Domestic Surveillance is Motivated by Fears that Environmental Disasters Could Fuel Anti-Government Activism

– NSA Secretly Exploited Devastating Heartbleed Bug for Years – Report

– NSA Security Running Amok to Plug Leaks About 9/11

– NSA Spying Did Not Result in a SINGLE Foiled Terrorist Plot

– NSA’s Top Hacking Unit

– NSA Top-Secret Document from 2012 – FOXACID – SECONDDATE – WILLOWVIXEN

– NSA Surveillance Goes Beyond Orwell’s Imagination – Says Alan Rusbridger

– NSA Took Part in The Development of Windows 7

– NSA Wants EZ Pass Control for Internet

-“Obese Intelligence” – The NSA Search Engine

– Quantum Insert

– Radio Mensajes Provenientes del Espacio Exterior – Documento Desclasificado de La NSA

– Russian Researchers Expose Breakthrough U.S. Spying Program

– Secret Archives – National Security & Privacy

View post:
The NSA – The Super Secret National Security Agency

Posted in NSA | Comments Off on The NSA – The Super Secret National Security Agency

How to: Use Tor for Windows | Surveillance Self-Defense

Posted: March 23, 2016 at 6:42 am

What is Tor?

Tor is a volunteer-run service that provides both privacy and anonymity online by masking who you are and where you are connecting. The service also protects you from the Tor network itself.

For people who might need occasional anonymity and privacy when accessing websites, Tor Browser provides a quick and easy way to use the Tor network.

The Tor Browser works just like other web browsers, except that it sends your communications through Tor, making it harder for people who are monitoring you to know exactly what you’re doing online, and harder for people monitoring the sites you use to know where you’re connecting from. Keep in mind that only activities you do inside of Tor Browser itself will be anonymized. Having Tor Browser installed on your computer does not make things you do on the same computer using other software (such as your regular web browser) anonymous.

Open a browser like Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, Microsoft Internet Explorer, or Microsoft Edge and go to:

https://www.torproject.org/projects/torbrowser.html.en

If you are using a search engine to look for the Tor Browser, make sure that the URL is correct.

Do not use any other source, and if you are prompted to accept alternative HTTPS (SSL/TLS) security certificates, do not proceed.

Click the large Download button, or scroll down to the Tor Browser Downloads section. Click on your desired language and OS version (Windows 32/64-bit).

Some browsers will ask you to confirm whether you want to download this file. Internet Explorer 11 shows a bar at the bottom of the browser window. For any browser, it is best to save the file first before proceeding. Click the Save button.

This example shows Tor Browser version 5.0.3 which is the current version at the time of writing this guide. There may be a more recent version of Tor Browser available for download by the time you read this, so please download and use the current version that Tor Project provides.

After the download is complete, you might get an option to open the folder where the file was downloaded to. The default location is the Downloads folder. Double-click on the file torbrowser-install-5.0.3_en-US.exe.

After double-clicking on the Tor Browser installer, a window will open with a warning about the origin of the software. You should always take these warnings seriously and make sure you trust the software you want to install and that you got an authentic copy from the official site over a secure connection. Since you know what you want, and you know where to get the software, and the download was from the Tor Project’s secure HTTPS site, go ahead and click Run.

A small window will open asking what language you want to use for the Tor Browser. There are several to choose from. Pick the language you want and click the OK button.

You’ll find a new window that will tell you where the Tor Browser will be installed. The default location is your desktop. You can change this to be a different location if you want, but for now keep the default.

The installation process is complete when you see a window that says you have completed the installation process. If you click the Finish button, the Tor Browser will start immediately and Start Tor Browser shortcuts will be added to the Start Menu and Desktop.

The first time Tor Browser starts, you’ll get a window that allows you to modify some settings if necessary. You might have to come back and change some configuration settings, but go ahead and try to connect to the Tor network by clicking the Connect button.

A new window will open with a green bar that illustrates Tor Browser connecting to the Tor network.

The first time Tor Browser starts it might take a bit longer than usual; but be patient, within a minute or two Tor Browser will open and congratulating you.

Click on the Tor Onion logo in the upper left of Tor Browser then the Privacy and Security Settings.

Some features of a normal web browser can make you vulnerable to man-in-the-middle attacks. Other features have previously had bugs in them that revealed users’ identities. Turning the security slider to a high setting disables these features. This will make you safer from well-funded attackers who can interfere with your Internet connection or use new unknown bugs in these features. Unfortunately, turning off these features can make some websites unusable. The default low setting is fine for everyday privacy protection, but you can set it to high if you are worried about sophisticated attackers, or if you don’t mind if some websites do not display correctly.

More:
How to: Use Tor for Windows | Surveillance Self-Defense

Posted in Tor Browser | Comments Off on How to: Use Tor for Windows | Surveillance Self-Defense

Chinas aggressive new censorship weapon can cripple your website

Posted: April 12, 2015 at 6:43 am

Provided by Quartz Dark designs

China has acquired a powerful new weapon in itsefforts to strictly controlinternet access and content.

Thats according to anew report released Apr. 10 by Citizen Lab, a research group at the University of Torontos Munk School of Global Affairs. It sheds more light on the recent distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacksagainst popular programming siteGitHub, and the nonprofit site GreatFire.org, which replicates websites already blocked by Chinese censors.

Citizen Lab says it had identified the new weaponwhich it has named Chinas Great Cannonresponsible for both attacks.

Located within Chinas massive Great Firewall censorship apparatus, the Great Cannon appears to operate asa separate tool thathijacks traffic to (or presumably from) individual IP addresses, and canarbitrarily replace unencrypted content as a man-in-the-middle,according to Citizen Lab.

In the case of online code repositoryGitHub, the Great Cannon was able to alter script distributed by Chinese search engine Baidu, redirecting massive amounts of bad trafficback towardsGitHubs servers in late March, reports the Verge. The attack, which lasted several days, was the largest the companyhad ever experienced.

While the Great Cannons ability to target and potentially take down websites is worrying enough, its also possible that the technologycould be tweaked in order to plant malware in millions of computers communicating with vulnerable Chinese servers, according to TechCrunch.

Those familiar with Edward Snowdens revelations may remember that the US already has this capability through the formerly top-secret NSA program QUANTUM.Unlike the US government, which attempted to keep the existence of QUANTUM a secret, China doesnot seem particularlyconcerned with hidingthis newest addition to it censorship arsenal. This brazenness both confuses and concerns the researchers at CitizenLab.

We remain puzzled as to why the GCs operator chose to first employ its capabilities in such a publicly visible fashion. Conducting such a widespread attack clearly demonstrates the weaponization of the Chinese Internet to co-opt arbitrary computers across the web and outside of China to achieve Chinas policy ends. The repurposing of the devices of unwitting users in foreign jurisdictions for covert attacks in the interests of one countrys national priorities is a dangerous precedentcontrary to international norms and in violation of widespread domestic laws prohibiting the unauthorized use of computing and networked systems.

See the original post here:
Chinas aggressive new censorship weapon can cripple your website

Posted in Censorship | Comments Off on Chinas aggressive new censorship weapon can cripple your website

'Great Cannon' widens China censorship: Researchers

Posted: April 11, 2015 at 7:43 am

WASHINGTON – China has expanded its Internet censorship efforts beyond its borders with a new strategy that attacks websites across the globe, researchers said Friday.

The new strategy, dubbed “Great Cannon,” seeks to shut down websites and services aimed at helping the Chinese circumvent the “Great Firewall,” according to a report by the Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto.

“While the attack infrastructure is co-located with the Great Firewall, the attack was carried out by a separate offensive system, with different capabilities and design, that we term the ‘Great Cannon,'” the report said.

“The Great Cannon is not simply an extension of the Great Firewall, but a distinct attack tool that hijacks traffic to (or presumably from) individual IP addresses.”

The report supports claims by the activist organisation GreatFire, which last month claimed China was seeking to shut down its websites that offer “mirrored” content from blocked websites like those of the New York Times and others.

The technique involves hijacking Internet traffic to the big Chinese search engine Baidu and using that in “denial of service” attacks which flood a website in an effort to knock it offline.

The report authors said the new tool represents “a significant escalation in state-level information control” by using “an attack tool to enforce censorship by weaponizing users.”

The Great Cannon manipulates the traffic of “bystander” systems including “any foreign computer that communicates with any China-based website not fully utilizing (encryption).”

‘Puzzling’ openness

The Citizen Lab researchers said they found “compelling evidence that the Chinese government operates the GC (Great Cannon),” despite Beijing’s denials of involvement in cyberattacks.

Read more here:
'Great Cannon' widens China censorship: Researchers

Posted in Censorship | Comments Off on 'Great Cannon' widens China censorship: Researchers

China's 'Great Cannon' DDoS tool enforces Internet censorship

Posted: at 7:43 am

China is deploying a tool that can be used to launch huge distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks to enforce censorship. Researchers have dubbed it the Great Cannon.

The first time the tool was seen in action was during the massive DDoS attacks that hit software development platform GitHub last month. The attack sent large amounts of traffic to the site, targeting Chinese anti-censorship projects hosted there. It was the largest attack the site has endured in its history.

That attack was first thought to have been orchestrated using Chinas Great Firewall, a sophisticated ring of networking equipment and filtering software used by the government to exert strict control over Internet access in the country. The firewall is used to block sites like Facebook and Twitter as well as several media outlets.

However, while the Great Cannon infrastructure is co-located with the Great Firewall, it is a separate, offensive system, with different capabilities and design, said researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Toronto on Friday.

The Great Cannon is not simply an extension of the Great Firewall, but rather a distinct tool that hijacks traffic to individual IP addresses, and can arbitrarily replace unencrypted content by sitting between the Web server and end usera method known as a man-in-the-middle attack. The system is used to manipulate the traffic of systems outside of China, silently programming browsers to create a massive DDoS attack, the researchers said.

The attack method deployed against Github injected malicious Javascript into browsers connecting to the Chinese search engine Baidu. When the Great Cannon sees a request for certain Javascript files on one of Baidus infrastructure servers that host commonly used analytics, social, or advertising scripts, it appears to take one of two actions. It either passes the request to Baidus servers, which has happened over 98 percent of the time, or it drops the request before it reaches Baidu and instead sends a malicious script back to the requesting user, which has happened about 1.75 percent of the time, the report said.

In the latter case, the requesting user would be an individual outside China browsing a website making use of a Baidu infrastructure server, such as sites with ads served by Baidus ad network. In the DDos attack against GitHub, the malicious script was used to enlist the requesting user as an unwitting participant, the report said.

These findings are in line with an analysis by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) that described the attack method used last week. According to the EFF, the attack was obviously orchestrated by people who had access to backbone routers in China and was only possible because the Baidu analytics script that is included on sites does not use encryption by default. A wider use of HTTPS could have prevented the attack, it found.

The Berkeley and Toronto researchers confirmed the suspicions about the origin of the attack, saying they believe there is compelling evidence that the Chinese government operates the cannon. They tested two international Internet links into China belonging to two different Chinese ISPs, and found that in both cases the Great Cannon was co-located with the Great Firewall. This strongly suggests a government actor, they said.

While DDoS attacks are quite crude, the Great Cannon can also be used in more sophisticated ways. A technically simple configuration change, switching the system to operating on traffic from a specific IP address rather than to a specific address, would allow Beijing to deliver malware to any computer outside of China that communicates with any Chinese server not employing cryptographic protections, they said.

Read the rest here:
China's 'Great Cannon' DDoS tool enforces Internet censorship

Posted in Censorship | Comments Off on China's 'Great Cannon' DDoS tool enforces Internet censorship

'Great Cannon' is widening China censorship, say researchers (Update)

Posted: at 7:43 am

21 hours ago by Rob Lever China has expanded its Internet censorship efforts beyond its borders with a new strategy that attacks websites across the globe, researchers say

China has expanded its Internet censorship efforts beyond its borders with a new strategy that attacks websites across the globe, researchers said Friday.

The new strategy, dubbed “Great Cannon,” seeks to shut down websites and services aimed at helping the Chinese circumvent the “Great Firewall,” according to a report by the Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto.

“While the attack infrastructure is co-located with the Great Firewall, the attack was carried out by a separate offensive system, with different capabilities and design, that we term the ‘Great Cannon,'” the report said.

“The Great Cannon is not simply an extension of the Great Firewall, but a distinct attack tool that hijacks traffic to (or presumably from) individual IP addresses.”

The report supports claims by the activist organization GreatFire, which last month claimed China was seeking to shut down its websites that offer “mirrored” content from blocked websites like those of the New York Times and others.

The technique involves hijacking Internet traffic to the big Chinese search engine Baidu and using that in “denial of service” attacks which flood a website in an effort to knock it offline.

The report authors said the new tool represents “a significant escalation in state-level information control” by using “an attack tool to enforce censorship by weaponizing users.”

The Great Cannon manipulates the traffic of “bystander” systems including “any foreign computer that communicates with any China-based website not fully utilizing (encryption).”

‘Puzzling’ openness

See the article here:
'Great Cannon' is widening China censorship, say researchers (Update)

Posted in Censorship | Comments Off on 'Great Cannon' is widening China censorship, say researchers (Update)

China anti-censorship projects attract GitHub's largest ever DDoS attacks

Posted: March 30, 2015 at 11:42 am

Home News Security China anti-censorship projects attract GitHub’s largest ever DDoS attacks GitHub has halted most of the distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks it has faced from Thursday of last week.

Share

A GitHub service called Gists, which lets people post bits of code, was still affected,the site said yesterday (Sunday 29 March). On Twitter, GitHub said it continued to adapt its defenses.

The attacks appeared to focus specifically on two projects hosted on GitHub, according to a blogger who goes by the nickname of Anthr@Xon a Chinese- and English-language computer security forum.

One project mirrors the content of The New York Times for Chinese users, and the other is run by Greatfire.org, a group that monitors websites censored by the Chinese government and develops ways for Chinese users to access banned services.

China exerts strict control over Internet access through its “Great Firewall,” a sophisticated ring of networking equipment and filtering software. The country blocks thousands of websites, including ones such as Facebook and Twitter and media outlets such as The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times and Bloomberg.

Anthr@X wrote that it appeared advertising and tracking code used by many Chinese websites appeared to have been modified in order to attack the GitHub pages of the two software projects.

The tracking code was written by Baidu, but it did not appear the search engine — the largest in China — had anything to do with it. Instead, Anthr@X wrote that some device on the border of China’s inner network was hijacking HTTP connections to websites within the country.

The Baidu tracking code had been replaced with malicious JavaScript that would load the two GitHub pages every two seconds. In essence, it means the attackers had roped in regular Internet users into their attacks without them knowing.

“In other words, even people outside China are being weaponised to target things the Chinese government does not like, for example, freedom of speech,” Anthr@X wrote.

Originally posted here:
China anti-censorship projects attract GitHub's largest ever DDoS attacks

Posted in Censorship | Comments Off on China anti-censorship projects attract GitHub's largest ever DDoS attacks

'Largest DDoS attack' in GitHub's history targets anticensorship projects

Posted: March 29, 2015 at 8:45 pm

GitHub has been hammered by a continuous DDoS attack for three days. It’s the “largest DDoS attack in github.com’s history.” The attack is aimed at anti-censorship GreatFire and CN-NYTimes projects, but affected all of GitHub; the traffic is coming from China as attackers are reportedly using China’s search engine Baidu for the purpose of “HTTP hijacking.”

According to tweeted GitHub status messages, GitHub has been the victim of a Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack since Thursday March 26. 24 hours later, GitHub had “all hands on deck” working to mitigate the continuous attack. After GitHub later deployed “volumetric attack defenses,” the attack morphed to include GitHub pages and then “pages and assets.” Today, GitHub said it was 71 hours into defending against the attack.

Seven hours later, GitHub said the attackers changed DDoS tactics and it was experiencing outages again.

Four hours later, GitHub said its services were stable although it was continuing to mitigate against the large-scale DDoS attack. Four hours after that, GitHub said the ongoing attack was affecting connectivity to GitHub Gist.

The attack is aimed at GreatFire and CN-NYTimes projects that help Chinese users get around their government’s online censorship, but affected all of GitHub. The traffic is coming from China.

According to analysis by Insight Labs, by a Chinese security researcher living outside of China, “My first thought was someone naughty XSSed the page, so I opened developer tools to find the source of the XSS,” Anthr@X wrote. “Almost instantly I saw it was keep trying to load these two URLs: github.com/greatefire/ and github.com/cn-nytimes/ every a few seconds.”

Baidu is like China’s Google and many Chinese website using tracking and advertising code from Baidu. The “HTTP hijacking” was explained as “a certain device at the border of China’s inner network and the Internet has hijacked the HTTP connections” and “replaced some JavaScript files from Baidu with malicious ones” that would load GitHub’s GreatFire and CN-NYTimes projects “every two seconds.”

CN-NYTimes gets around censorship by mirroring NYTimes and GreatFire has long been fighting against Chinese censorship.

Ten days ago, GreatFire said it was “under attack” and asked for help. Last week GreatFire wrote about having “concrete proof from Google that CNNIC (and by extension CAC) is indeed complicit in MITM attacks.” That post pointed to Google Security Engineer Adam Langley saying Google was aware of “unauthorized digital certificates for several Google domains.” The certificates were issued by CNNIC (China Internet Network Information Center).

While GreatFire was reportedly “delighted that Google, Microsoft and Mozilla have taken steps to blacklist the intermediate certificate used in the attack,” the online censorship watchdog called on “Google, Mozilla, Microsoft and Apple to revoke trust for CNNIC immediately in order to protect Chinese user data and user data worldwide.”

More here:
'Largest DDoS attack' in GitHub's history targets anticensorship projects

Posted in Censorship | Comments Off on 'Largest DDoS attack' in GitHub's history targets anticensorship projects

Someone hijacked the Google of China to attack anti-censorship tools

Posted: March 28, 2015 at 11:42 am

An unknown party hijacked widely used tools developed byBaidu, the largest search engine in China, this week in an apparent attempt to target onlinesoftwareused to get around Chinese censorship.

The assailants injected malicious code into the tools Baidu uses to serve ads on a wide range of Chinese Web sites and to provide analytics for Web developers, according to researchers. The code instructed the browsers of visitors to those sites to rapidly connect to other sites, but in a way that the visitors couldn’t detect. That sent a flood of traffic to twoanti-censorship tools offered by the groupGreatFire hosted on GitHub, apopular siteused by programmers to collaborate on software development. One of the tools targeted by the attackeffectively allows Chinese users to access a translated version of the New York Times.

At times the attack made GitHub, which is used by programmers around the world and the U.S. government itself, unavailable for some users.

GitHub was briefly blocked inside China in 2013, but reinstated after an outcry from programmers. Because GitHub uses encryption to hide specific parts of the site, the Chinese government cannotselectively block only some of GitHub’scontent. But blocking the site wholesale could be damaging to China’s economy becauseit is so widely used by the tech industry.

GreatFire reported its own site was the subject of a similar traffic flooding attack earlier this month.

While determining the entities behind these types of attacks is difficult, the Chinese government would be an obvious culprit, said James A. Lewis, a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.”The only people who would really benefit from it would be China,” he said. Using such a bold tactic to attack content it dislikes seems to be either a way for the government to send a message or test out new capabilities, he said.

[Related: Is this North Korea? Chinese netizens squirm as party tightens grip on Internet.]

“The last couple months we’ve seen a real sea change in Chinese Internet policy, where they’ve become more assertive about blocking Western sites and pushing back on their citizen’s ability to access information from outside of the country,” Lewis said. Earlier this year, many virtual private network (VPN) services relied on by Chinese citizens to evade censorshipbecame inaccessiblewithin the country.

Baidu — which is basically China’s Google — denied involvement in the incident. “After a thorough investigation, Baidu security engineers have ruled out either security issues with Baidu products or a hacking attack on Baidu as possibilities,” the company told The Washington Post in a statement. “We have been in touch with other security organizations to apprise them of the situation, and we will work together on getting to the bottom of related issues.”

GreatFire did not immediately respond to a Washington Post inquiry about the attacks. Nor did the Chinese government. GitHub acknowledged it was the victim of a “continuous” attack for more than 24 hours in a Tweet posted late Thursday night. The latest update on the GitHub’s status pagesays the service is “intermittently unavailable for some users” due to the attack.

Follow this link:
Someone hijacked the Google of China to attack anti-censorship tools

Posted in Censorship | Comments Off on Someone hijacked the Google of China to attack anti-censorship tools