Tag Archives: social-security

Freedom America, Inc.

Posted: January 14, 2016 at 10:46 pm

Freedom AMERICA Inc. | Call us at 813-600-5314 (Brandon, FL), 863-682-6381 (Lakeland, FL)

We understand how important it is for you to be able to trust your advisor, particularly in the wake of recent highly publicized corporate failures and investment management misdeeds. Regardless of the direction the stock market and interest rates it’s important to have a trusted advisor to look after your best interests. That trusted advisor is Jonathan Jackson. He isexperienced, responsive and understands your need for integrity and transparency.

RETIREMENT PLANNING: People can no longer rely on Social Security to cover all their retirement needs. Individuals are living longer, health costs are rising, non-traditional retirement plans are being eliminated and the cost of living is constantly increasing. Freedom America Inc. can help you start planning today to safeguard your future retirement needs. At Freedom America Inc., our advisors are thoroughly trained to help our clients avoid unnecessary risks during or before their retirement years. We will help you protect your hard-earned retirement assets in diverse markets and provide you with the lifetime income you will need (while potentially reducing your tax liabilities).

Our goal is to help you not worry about your money while you try to experience complete enjoyment during your retirement years. To schedule a FREE no-obligation consultation, please call us at: 813-600-5314 (Brandon office) 863-682-6381 (Lakeland office)

Double Click Logos To View Profiles

Jonathan Jackson, president of Freedom America Inc. was recently featured on RETIREMENT NEWS TODAY. Click the videos tab to view these informative videos.

TAX PLANNING

Protecting What’s Important to You

Contact Us To Attend One Of Our Informative Workshops

For a married couple, the difference between a good Social Security election decision and a poor one is often well over $100,000! What’s At Stake For You?

To Be On The List For Tax Preparation, Please CLICK HERE

See the rest here:
Freedom America, Inc.

Posted in Freedom | Comments Off on Freedom America, Inc.

Portal:Libertarianism – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Posted: August 8, 2015 at 1:40 pm

The Cato Institute is a libertarian think tank headquartered in Washington, D.C. It was founded in 1977 by Edward H. Crane, who remained president and CEO for 35 years until 2012 when he was replaced by John A. Allison, and Charles Koch, chairman of the board and chief executive officer of the conglomerate Koch Industries, Inc., the second largest privately held company (after Cargill) by revenue in the United States.

The Institute’s stated mission is “to broaden the parameters of public policy debate to allow consideration of the traditional American principles of limited government, individual liberty, free markets, and peace” by striving “to achieve greater involvement of the intelligent, lay public in questions of policy and the proper role of government.” Cato scholars conduct policy research on a broad range of public policy issues, and produce books, studies, op-eds, and blog posts. They are also frequent guests in the media.

Cato scholars were critical of George W. Bush’s Republican administration (20012009) on several issues, including the Iraq War, civil liberties, education, agriculture, energy policy, and excessive government spending. On other issues, most notably health care, Social Security, global warming, tax policy, and immigration, Cato scholars praised Bush administration initiatives. During the 2008 U.S. presidential election, Cato scholars criticized both major-party candidates, John McCain and Barack Obama.

The Cato Institute was named the fifth-ranked think tank in the world for 2009 in a study of leading think tanks by James G. McGann, Ph.D. of the University of Pennsylvania, based on a criterion of excellence in “producing rigorous and relevant research, publications and programs in one or more substantive areas of research”. It has been called “Washingtons premier libertarian think tank.”

Ronald Ernest Paul (born August 20, 1935) is a Republican United States Congressman from Lake Jackson, Texas, a physician, a bestselling author, and the fourth-place finisher in the 2008 Republican presidential primaries.

Originally from the Green Tree suburb of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, he graduated from Gettysburg College in 1957, then studied at Duke University School of Medicine; after his 1961 graduation and a residency in obstetrics and gynecology, he became a U.S. Air Force flight surgeon, serving outside the Vietnam War zone. He later represented Texas districts in the U.S. House of Representatives (19761977, 19791985, and 1997present). He entered the 1988 presidential election, running as the Libertarian nominee while remaining a registered Republican, and placed a distant third.

Read more:
Portal:Libertarianism – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Posted in Libertarianism | Comments Off on Portal:Libertarianism – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

How to pump up retirement income by as much as 30%

Posted: March 10, 2015 at 3:43 am

When you retire, you want to live like this guy.

Worried you wont have enough for a comfortable retirement? If youre willing to spend down your assets, as well as take a few other steps, you could boost your annual income by perhaps 30%.

Imagine a couple, both 62 years old. Well keep things simple and assume theres just one breadwinnerand well be politically incorrect and assume its the husband. They claim Social Security right away, even though they cant receive full benefits for another four years. He qualifies for $15,000 a year and his wife is eligible for spousal benefits worth $7,000.

Meanwhile, they own a $300,000 home with no mortgage and have $500,000 in savings. If they use the 4% portfolio withdrawal rate thats often recommended by financial planners, that $500,000 would generate $20,000 in first-year retirement income, with withdrawals rising in subsequent years along with inflation.

Add that to their Social Security and our hypothetical couple would have $42,000 a year. Heres how they could do better.

Paying to delay

Instead of claiming benefits at age 62, the husband files for Social Security at 66which is his full Social Security retirement agebut immediately suspends his benefit. This maneuver allows his wife to claim spousal benefits, which would be worth $10,000 a year, thanks to the four-year delay. Theres no point in postponing spousal benefits beyond full retirement age, because you dont get any further credit for delaying.

Meanwhile, the husband claims Social Security at age 70, the latest possible age. Because of the delay, he receives $26,400 a year, while also guaranteeing a larger survivor benefit for his wife, assuming he predeceases her.

The best annuity you can buy is Social Security, argues Baylor University investments professor William Reichenstein. The higher-income earner should delay benefits unless theyre both in poor health, because his benefit will be paid until the second spouse dies.

At age 70, our couple would have $36,400 in combined Social Security income. This figure is in todays dollars and ignores any intervening inflation-driven increases in Social Security benefits. To keep things simple, well also assume that their portfolios return rivals the inflation rate.

Go here to see the original:
How to pump up retirement income by as much as 30%

Posted in Politically Incorrect | Comments Off on How to pump up retirement income by as much as 30%

Feds, defense turn to DNA in Kansas identity theft case

Posted: January 17, 2015 at 8:44 pm

WICHITA, Kan. (AP) A federal judge has postponed the Kansas trial of a man charged with assuming the identity of a dead Texas boy, giving the prosecution and defense time to obtain DNA that each side hopes will bolster their case.

While DNA evidence has long been a mainstay in other criminal trials, its use in an immigration-related identity theft case like the one filed against Teodoro Erasmo Luna is rare. Most such cases also don’t lend themselves to DNA testing because the government usually doesn’t have a way to get a comparative DNA sample.

In this case, the U.S. attorney’s office wants to compare the defendant’s DNA to the sisters of the child he is accused of impersonating, David Pena.

Luna is charged in a 17-count indictment with aggravated identity theft, misuse of a Social Security number, document fraud, making a false statement on a U.S. passport application, making a false claim of U.S. citizenship, among other related crimes.

The idea to use DNA testing was initially brought up by the prosecutor, and the judge agreed after the defense also asked the court to delay the Jan. 13 trial to allow time to conduct the test and receive results. U.S. District Judge J. Thomas Marten said the DNA testing will help the parties reach a resolution and set March 24 as the new trial date.

Defense attorney Joel Mandelman declined to comment.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Brent Anderson said the case is unusual because Luna still claims to be “a person we know he is not.”

“The government has investigated this case extensively, and while it has substantial evidence of the defendant’s true identity, much of that evidence is based on the inadmissible testimony of the defendant’s true relatives, who appear to live in Mexico, cannot be located or cannot be compelled to come to the United States to testify,” Anderson argued in one court filing.

Prosecutors have been unable to locate Pena’s death certificate. So they asked the court to allow them to put on the stand the four sisters of David Pena to testify their brother was born in 1967 in McAllen, Texas, and died in Mexico when he was 5 years old. One of the sisters was expected to testify that she had visited her brother’s grave, but could not remember the name of the cemetery. Both of Pena’s parents are dead.

Luna’s defense attorney has objected to allowing the sisters’ testimony on the grounds that it was hearsay.

Read more:
Feds, defense turn to DNA in Kansas identity theft case

Posted in DNA | Comments Off on Feds, defense turn to DNA in Kansas identity theft case

Everybody Loves Libertarianism, Insists Libertarian

Posted: March 27, 2014 at 8:41 pm

Kevin Williamson, a libertarian-ish conservative writer for the National Review, wrote a bracingly honest assessment of the limited appeal of Rand Pauls ideology. (Short story: Most people really love the biggest government programs, like Social Security and Medicare.) This confession against ideological interest naturally antagonized Reasons Nick Gillespie, who is not only a libertarian-libertarian, but also deeply committed to his belief that libertarianism is always, just you wait and see, on the rise.

Gillespie counters Williamson with a sputtering piece arguing that Rand Paul is poised to seize the center of the American political debate with his innovative proposals, such as saving Ukraine by cutting aid to Ukraine. Gillespie bolsters his thesis with a random collage of factoids:

The one sort-of on-point factoid Gillespie offers is a poll conducted by the libertarian Reason foundation showing that, contrary to the overwhelming findings of pollsters everywhere, voters really do want to cut Medicare and Social Security. The unstated joke here, in case you didnt catch it, is that every interest group has its own handcrafted polls showing that, if you word the question in just the right way, overwhelming numbers of Americans agree with their position on any given issue. And sure enough, Reasons poll has its own wording that finds people are really keen to cut Social Security and Medicare. But this poll, just like every advocacy poll, is worthless, because in real politics, one side of the issue cant control the terms by which it will be debated.

The movie Divergent provides the frame for Gillespies paean to Paul. I have not seen the film. Apperently it describes a future in which people are slotted from birth into categories, and those who refuse to follow along are Marked for Death! This theme, explains Gillespie, sums up Rand Paul. Because obviously the clearest hallmark of an independent rebel is a candidate who has devoted his entire life to slavishly carrying out his fathers kooky dogma.

See the rest here:
Everybody Loves Libertarianism, Insists Libertarian

Posted in Libertarianism | Comments Off on Everybody Loves Libertarianism, Insists Libertarian

Editorial: Longevity brings new challenges

Posted: January 16, 2014 at 6:43 pm

According to a memorable summary of Newtons Third Law of Motion, for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

Perhaps someday geroscience the study of human aging and its impacts will identify a law similar to Newtons Third.

A recent article by the Sarasota Herald-Tribune described the emerging field of science surrounding aging. An Associated Press article predicting a global retirement crisis reinforced that notion.

The Herald-Tribune article focused on Florence Katz of Sarasota, a 98-year-old woman who remains happy, healthy and active.

She is not alone. Longevity has increased dramatically in the United States and the Western world. For millions of those older adults, life is good.

However, there are downsides to longevity difficulties associated with disabilities, health and memory problems, lack of long-term income.

Experts and demographers debate the details of life expectancies but, in general, there is no dispute about the aging of the planets population. Consider this: There are now more people older than 65 than people younger than 15.

Linda P. Fried, dean of public health at Columbia University, said the increase in life expectancy offers us a new stage … and were not very well prepared for it.

The AP article focused on a troubling and pervasive lack of preparation worldwide. The news service quoted Norman Dreger, a retirement specialist in Germany, who said, The first wave of underprepared workers is going to try to go into retirement and will find they cant afford to do so.

The political responses to such concerns usually involve debates over whether to raise the age for Social Security benefits or create a new program for younger Americans. Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid are vital components of the existing social safety net. Yet there are signs that those programs, designed decades ago, will not be sustainable in a radically different era without alterations.

Go here to see the original:
Editorial: Longevity brings new challenges

Posted in Human Longevity | Comments Off on Editorial: Longevity brings new challenges

80 NYPD and FDNY officers charged with disability fraud – Video

Posted: at 6:41 pm



80 NYPD and FDNY officers charged with disability fraud
On Tuesday, 80 retired New York City police officers and firefighters were charged with Social Security disability frauds. The sprawling, decades-long scheme…

By: gece m

Read more:
80 NYPD and FDNY officers charged with disability fraud – Video

Posted in Ron Paul | Comments Off on 80 NYPD and FDNY officers charged with disability fraud – Video

High Court takes up DNA sampling case

Posted: February 25, 2013 at 6:55 pm

On Tuesday, the Supreme Court will try to balance the rights of Americans who have not been convicted of a major crime to keep their DNA out of the government’s hands, against the government’s interest in closing cold cases and the rights of crime victims to finally see justice done.

Years ago, the Salisbury Police Department thought they had finally caught a break.

A man wearing a hat and scarf and brandishing a gun had raped and robbed a 53-year-old woman in her home and then vanished into the night. Almost six years later, Alonzo King was arrested in a nearby county and charged with felony second-degree assault. Taking advantage of a Maryland law that allowed DNA tests following felony arrests, police took a cheek swab of King’s DNA which matched a sample from the 2003 Salisbury rape. King was convicted of rape and sentenced to life in prison.

But then a Maryland court said they had to let him go.

King was never convicted of the crime for which he was arrested and swabbed. Instead, he pleaded guilty to the lesser charge of misdemeanor assault, a crime for which Maryland cannot take DNA samples. The courts said it violated King’s rights for the state to take his DNA based on an arrest alone. The state Court of Appeals said King had “a sufficiently weighty and reasonable expectation of privacy against warrantless, suspicionless searches.”

If the Supreme Court justices rule for King, more than 1 million DNA profiles that have been stored in a federal database for matching with future crime scene evidence may have to be purged and others will never be collected, leading some repeat offenders to go free, advocates say.

“The early collection of DNA prevents crime,” said William C. Sammons of the Maryland Coalition Against Sexual Assault. “Had the recidivists been identified early in their career through arrestee collection, they would not have been able to commit the bulk of their crimes.”

But privacy activists see letting police use DNA information without a warrant or a conviction as another loss for American privacy, with Americans’ genetic information held by the government eventually being used for other purposes, just as Social Security numbers were originally not intended to be used for identification.

“Regardless of what the government does with the DNA sample and the limits it places on the sample’s use, all the highly personal data in it is in the government’s possession, and outside the individual’s control,” said Jennifer Lynch, lawyer for the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

Getting DNA swabs from criminals is common. All 50 states and the federal government take cheek swabs from convicted criminals to check against federal and state databanks, with the court’s blessing. But now, 28 states and the federal government now also take samples from people who have been arrested for various crimes, long before their guilt or innocence has been proven. According to court documents, the FBI’s Combined DNA Index System or CODIS — a coordinated system of federal, state and local databases of DNA profiles — contains more than 10 million criminal profiles and 1.1 million arrestee profiles.

See the article here:
High Court takes up DNA sampling case

Posted in DNA | Comments Off on High Court takes up DNA sampling case

Bombing of Social security Building – Video

Posted: December 16, 2012 at 6:42 am



Bombing of Social security Building
On November 30,2012 Abdullatif Aldosary an Iraqi refugee who helped the United States in the uprising against Saddam Hussein in 1991 attempted to blow up a Social Security Building. It is said the Aldosary set off a bomb at a social security building in Casa Grande, Arizona then jumped into his car and drove off with his car ablaze. The mainstream media hasn't reported on the issue citing it would be politically incorrect.From:Daniel RichterViews:0 0ratingsTime:05:08More inNews Politics

Read the original post:
Bombing of Social security Building – Video

Posted in Politically Incorrect | Comments Off on Bombing of Social security Building – Video

How Proposals to Raise Medicare, Social Security Ages Can Harm Americans

Posted: December 15, 2012 at 12:43 am

Proposals to raise the eligibility ages for both Medicare and Social Security keep surfacing in news accounts of the ongoing fiscal-cliff negotiations. The idea has “first blush” appeal–Americans are, on average, living longer and societal longevity gains have added 30 more years of life in just the past century. Among mankind’s many achievements, this one deserves far more accolades than it receives.

Averages, however, are just that. And there are few places where not being average exacts a higher toll than in looking at human longevity. Social scientists have assembled an increasingly powerful record that shows longevity gains have not been doled out equally. Well-educated and higher-income people of all races are, indeed, living longer. But despite major gains in treating and even preventing life-shortening diseases, lifespans among Americans with low levels of education and income have been moving in the opposite direction.

“In 2008, U.S. adult men and women with fewer than twelve years of education had life expectancies not much better than those of all adults in the 1950s and 1960s,” researchers concluded in a recent study published in the journal Health Affairs. “When race and education are combined, the disparity is even more striking.”

[Read: Retirement Plan Tips for 2013.]

“White U.S. men and women with 16 years or more of schooling had life expectancies far greater than black Americans with fewer than 12 years of education–14.2 years more for white men than black men, and 10.3 years more for white women than black women,” researchers said. “These gaps have widened over time and have led to at least two ‘Americas,’ if not multiple others, in terms of life expectancy, demarcated by level of education and racial-group membership.”

These are enormous and disturbing gaps, and the age-related eligibility rules of Medicare and Social Security are simply not geared to effectively deal with them. Devising equitable policies would require extensive legislative collaboration and nuanced regulatory policies that are nowhere to be found in the fiscal-cliff negotiations.

[Read: Education: A Predictor of Longer Life.]

Medicare, in particular, is simply not designed to meet the needs of an aging society, argues Michael S. Sparer, chair of the department of Health Policy and Management at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. It is not equipped to help people retain their health but to provide acute care when they become seriously ill. Even then, it does not provide long-term care assistance, which will be needed by a projected 70 percent of our increasingly long-lived population.

The Affordable Care Act sets in motion numerous changes that would make Medicare more helpful to seniors, but most experts agree it falls far short of its potential, particularly in long-term care.

Social Security, for its part, has long recognized income differences in its benefits formulas. It provides lower-income beneficiaries with payments that replace much more of their preretirement incomes than is the case with higher-income retirees.

View post:
How Proposals to Raise Medicare, Social Security Ages Can Harm Americans

Posted in Human Longevity | Comments Off on How Proposals to Raise Medicare, Social Security Ages Can Harm Americans